Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
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  • #25057
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Like a few other folks I started shooting a bow as a kid. My father bought a recurve for me when I was about 10 in 1965. Not sure where that got to, but I didn’t have another bow until about 1985 when I bought a Browning Excellorator Plus. It was a nice bow for the time with an adjustable weight 55#-70# I think let off was about 50%. I picked up a few old recurves at flea markets and yard sales, I always liked recurves and just kept looking for them.

    I had all that stuff and more stored in my garage ceiling, then one day one of my motorcycles leaked gas from the petcock and caught fire destroying the bike and all the bows @ 1996. So now I have a couple compound bows and 2 recurves I bought used.

    I haven’t practiced at all for a long time, but I’m going to start now and shoot at least once a week. I decided to buy a release yesterday. I was shooting without a tab which wouldn’t normally bother me, but I have a cut on the end of my finger and it was difficult to pull the string. So I figure i’l be more accurate with a release anyway even if they are a nuisance to use, but I’ll be able to shoot as long as a have at least one finger working.

    #25063
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I do not own a bow. I have been thinking about it for a long time. I have a good friend that owns three and he has been telling me to buy one. I need to learn which one to buy and which one would be easier for me to handle.

    #25065
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Freedom,
    Crossbows are the easiest to aim well, they can be used with optical sights like a firearm. There is no effort to hold the string.

    Compound bows would be second on the list. They can have sights, the pull wieght is reduced with let off so you can hold the string with less effort.

    Last would be a traditional bow, usually no sights and you hold the full draw weight. However they are very light weight and simple in design. Not much can go wrong.

    #25067
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    If it were me I would choose the recurve bow for SHTF. There are just to many things that need tuning and tweeking on compound and crossbows, things that require specialized tools and equipment. With the draw weights from modern equipment you cannot substitute strings either if one breaks and you don’t have a spare. At least with a recurve you could use paracord if you had to. It wouldn’t be my first choice but it would work. The other benifit to the recurve is you could make your own arrows in a pinch. With compound and crossbows there is so much force generated, makeshift arrows would blow up in your face or at the very least drive part of the shaft through your arm. Recurves take more practice and skill but for the long haul and simplicity recurves get my vote

    #25074
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I like the crossbow because they are easy to aim like a rifle but they do take a lot of time to reload which is what my friend keeps telling me. The compound bows is what he owns and he says he can shoot three to four arrows for each arrow I can shoot with the crossbow.

    The traditional bows would take more skill but they are easy to fix in a SHTF.

    I think for me I would buy a compound bow and a traditional bow. It will be more money but by having the two you can’t go wrong in a SHTF.

    Thanks for the info 74, and matt76.

    #25078
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Lol Free. Buying one of each reminds me of the old Deon Sanders commercial when they asked him if he wanted 15 or 20 million for his contract and he said “Both”

    #25079
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    If you buy used pay careful attention to the strings, cables and cams. Look for twisted arms.
    Don’t buy anything that looks like it was used hard no matter how good of a deal it is.

    #25081
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I love shooting bows. Even though compounds are pretty awesome to shoot they are slow to reload compared to other types of bows. Bows for self defense arent the best choice, but when it comes to ambushes and you are a good shot (and maybe others in your group too) then this would be a great choice (especially if you have other weapons as backup). Not that anyone here would want to ambush anyone, just saying.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #25084
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    My family and I are heavy into archery. I have 3 compounds, 1 takedown recurve and 1 longbow. My son has 2 compounds. The wife and daughter each have their own comounds as well. My son and I teach bowhunter education and take a lot of game with an arrow every year. Here is my take on archery:

    Compound bows: With proper practice and some gear investment you can reasonably hit soda cans at 40 yards without too much issue. Our family is over 90% hit rate on paper plate size targets at 60 yards. I am a little better, but really have my Martin dialed in. Compounds are very accurate and pack one heck of a punch. Because we use 4 blade broadheads for hunting big game, we put a hole the size of my thumb completely through the animal. With small game, we destroy a lot of meat with our heavier weight bows. We also damage a lot of arrows with small game due to the nature of carbon arrows. Carbon arrows are strong, but one small crack will destroy the whole thing. It is not that hard to crack one either. If you hit a rock or glance off a tree stump it is not that uncommon to destroy a carbon arrow.

    Traditional (trad) bows: I love my takedown. It is 60 lb pull, but I can vary the pull so that I can match my desired arrow speed/power to what I am shooting. I don’t have to do a full draw when hunting squirrels or rabbits. This helps save arrows and meat. Many people freak out about draw variance, moving anchor points, and the sort. These are the people that have never read any historical documents about hunting with a bow. Ishi’s interviews mentioned this techique and we know most of what we know about bow hunting due to his teachings. Saxton and Arthur (Pope and Young who don’t know their first names) learned from him and passed along that knowledge in such works as “Hunting with the Bow and Arrow.”

    What it all comes down to is this: If you want to learn archery, learn ALL aspects of archery and apply it to the equipment you have. Learn target shooting (although I have never had to defend myself from a target so only some principals apply), trad as well as compound bow hunting, and then research trad bowhunting principals for big and small game. This should be enough information for you to be able to head out and practice with your gear. Just be leery of those “archery experts” that do 3D shoots and competitions. Their techniques are based upon that venue and have NOTHING to do with shooting a variety of game in a variety of situations. Keep that in mind because they will shove specific forms down your throat as the only way to shoot. Also be leery of big game only hunters. Make sure you learn about hunting all game to include bow fishing and bird hunting. There are good techniques you can adapt from both fishing/bird hunting that can transition over to make you more well rounded.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #25089
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    matt76 will buy the two because my son and I can learn the two, once we learn and know if we can do good with the tradition then I will buy one more. You are right that the recurve you can repair there strings and make arrows for them which is real good in a SHTF times. But I do like the compound bows. They are easy to handle for a starter like me. I know that it will cost more but I am thinking of buying the bow fishing to it since there is so many places to fish here.

    matt76 I know you are LOL but there are four of us here so I start with two and will know what they can handle then buy two more. So I am not spending more that what I was planning in the first place.

    sledjockey has a point where all the family can get one.

    #25094
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Sled, thanks for your input.

    #25099
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    There are pluses and minuses to both. I don’t know how old your kids are but Matthews make a compound, I believed it is called the Genesis, that grows with your kids. Most compound bows only adjust about 20 lbs or so of draw weight and 3 to 4 in of draw length but tthe Genesis adjusts something like 6″ of draw length and goes from like 30 lbs all the way to 60 lbs. They are a little pricey but it would be cheaper than buying a second compound bow if your kids out grow the first one. Bow fishing is a lot of fun. Ok it’s addictive!!!!! I started doing it a couple of years ago. I just wish I had more time to do it. If you decide to try bow fishing before SHTF check the game laws in your state to see what species of fish are legal to take with archery equipment.

    #25100
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Ohhhhhh. I almost forgot. If you decide to get into bow fishing DO NOT use the big push button Zebco type reels for attaching your arrow to. If the reel hangs up the arrow can come back and hit you. The attached picture is a picture of what the arrow did to me when that happened. I almost got a third nostril. If it had hit about 1/4 inch higher or lower it would have either went into my sinus cavity or in my mouth and most likely would have lodged in my throat. Fortunately it hit solid bone and stopped. It hurt like heck and almost knocked me out but it was about the only place it could have hit and not done serious damage. God was watching out for me. Two of my daughters were with me when it happened.

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    #25149
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Survivalist
    member4

    Have a crossbow, had a compound, made a take-down flat bow and other self bows, have shot recurves (i like them) and intend to try making one soon.
    ‘Roving’ or ‘stump-shooting’ is good practice for a variety of ‘real-life’ archery situations and makes you into a more flexible archer.
    I would suggest learning with a compound as you can develop some success and consistency more easily to start out and not get discouraged. Shoot without a sight or stabilizers though.
    I would however, advocate learning to shoot a trad. bow of some sort though; a shorter recurve like a cavalry bow would be my suggestion; it is more mobile, often faster limbed, weighs less and has less ‘stack’ (though a higher early draw weight).
    I would also suggest buying all three “traditional bowyer’s bible” books and a couple of draw knives and spoke shaves.
    modern string materials might also be worth investing in (minimal space taken up, notably increased performance.

    #25153
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Frozenthunderbot, thanks for the info will start with the compound bow.

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