Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 29 total)
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  • #7887
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I live in Texas near the Gulf Coast. From time to time we have hurricanes that come through, some cause minor damage and others are disasterous. When hurricane Rita hit about 3 weeks or so after Katrina destroyed New Orleans, people were in a panic. When the order was given to evacuate there was no order to it and everyone left at once.
    All major highways leading to the coast were designated contra flow which means all lanes of the highway were turned into an outbound direction of travel. Before the evacuation order was given I was sent to the coast to remove some equipment before the storm hit. We left early in the morning in order to get there and get out before the evacuation started.

    We got the equipment and were almost back home when we got a call to go back and get some other equipment. Unfortunately after going back we did not finish until after the evacuation had started. Normal travel time from the coast to our final destination is normally about 2 hours. We left the coast headed home within an hour of the evacuation and it took us 13 hours to get home. Every major highway was grid locked. One highway from Houston to Dallas was jammed the whole way. That is a 300 mile traffic jam!!! People were running out of gas and had only traveled 20 miles. There were reports of people being in their cars for 2 days and only traveling 50 miles or so. The state has now developed different stratagies for evacuation and we have not had that type of caos since, not even during Ike which caused a lot more damage than Rita. I bring all this up to point out the importance of having more than 1 or 2 exit routes to your BOL.

    I travel in Texas a lot and know lots of back roads and short cuts but even with that it still took us 13 hrs to make a 2 hr trip. Look at your exit routes. Study them closely. Drive them. Find connecting roads that may even go through neighborhoods. Even if a path takes you an hour out of your planned route you should still know where it is. An hour out of your way could save you days of being stranded on a major road. Coastal regions are used to evacuation but many of the inland states have never dealt with mass evacuations.

    They may have a plan in place but have never had an event that allowed them to test it. In a SHTF situation order will quickly fade. There may be little time for local LE to plan for it. What if a terrorist sets off a dirty nuke in your city? You may not live in the blast area but you may be in the fall out path. In a split second everyone everyone will be running for their lives. Know your way out!

    #7896
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    All good points Matt!

    #7898
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    I think it’s important to know every avenue of escape from large centres, and even when you’re in a mall, restaurant, etc.

    Might just save your life knowing where an exit or a back road is.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #7902
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Same thing would happen here in Florida. In the Cities you will not be able to get out.

    #8738
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Thanks for sharing this Matt. Im curious if in the near future the use of navigation systems will help or at least ease the whole situation. Given that many people use some sort of navigation in their car this could at least ease the problem.

    Its a tough decision once your car is stuck to abandon it and head your way… glad you got through this mess.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #8833
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Thanks Jay. Navigation systems have helped a great deal but there is something few people know about them. Many of them operate off of cell phone towers. Now that there are so many towers and technology has advanced they can triangulate your location based off what tower your phone is operating off of. This is way cheaper than satalites.
    If the towers quit working your GPS may not work as well as you would like. Depending on the situation the government could also block civilian use of satalites making true GPS systems useless. Those are the reasons I recommended driving and knowing your exit routes ahead of time. Never be totally dependant on tech.

    #8839
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    We regularly get city folk who follow their gps blindly.
    As such some of the “roads” they are sent down aren’t maintained in the summer, let alone the winter.

    Technology is great.

    I80 was closed from Sunday afternoon through Monday @900.
    Between the accidents, 47 vehicle pileup, the wind, the ice and snow, it just isn’t safe.

    Yet at the same time, some moonbat from california called 911 because its april and the road shouldn’t be closed. Seriously.

    These people are so dependent on tech that they can’t look up from their texting to not walk into pools, off train platforms and the like.

    Add to that, this is the mountains.
    Cell triangulation doesn’t work as well as some think.
    Sometimes, not at all.
    We had a search and rescue call last year where an 80+ year old gent with dimentia got lost in his car.
    Then he went walking.
    He could call out, and receive calls.
    Just didn’t know where he was.
    They got his signal on one tower.
    The others were so mixed up from bounced signals, they were useless.
    They only knew what side of the county he was on, made for a very long night.

    #8842
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    It make sense to know all alternative ways out, şome of them may not been in use today, some of them may be not allowed to use today (wrong ways, turns etc.) but when SHTF lot of things are allowed.

    Best thing is to leave area before everybody else wants to leave it.

    #8852
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I like the idea of getting the latest maps since we really do not know what the SHTF will be like and if it is an EMP or and attack on all the internet then all of that information will not work. Maps are easy to take in your bag. If you have something that you hide with the GPS see if you can mark it on your map too so you can find it if the grid goes down.

    #8874
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    There is a problem with all fixed or mobile direction devices. They are only as good as the information they use. In this area if you follow most systems you will wind up in a lake, in the middle of a field occupied by one big angry bull
    or in an area you would not enter even with a tank.
    Maps may not have all the bells and whistles but they do not require batteries!

    Robin

    #8876
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Gents and ladies,
    Do not put vital info in your GPS units.
    Nor mark them on a map.

    Too easy to lose them to a hostile force.
    The they have corroborating evidence against you.

    The best answer I’ve found? If you must keep it all together?
    The little black book. The old phone address book everyone had before phones became smart.

    First, change to UTM coordinates, then change those into telephone numbers, being sure to match up the area codes. Need a few more numbers? Make it a business number with extension numbers.

    Erase all tracks on your GPS that correspond.
    Want to leave breadcrumbs for family?
    Become romantic, mark a state map with places you’ve been with your significant other, picnic with “lisa” 2008. Then mark it with places yet to go, canoe trip 2015, etc.
    Food caches are picnics, weapons are arrowheads found, etc.

    If you must leave an “open” list, make it part of your geocaching hobby. Build an innocent list with public caches, including the contents, leaving a couple with no contents, then insert your location into/as one of the empty caches listed. Leave the list for ‘grandson johnny’ to finish as a reminder of your games together.

    #8894
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    It was suggested that we get maps of the County roads , many are dirt , but they are maintained , and virtually unknown to the public .

    #8937
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tolik, Yes if you get newer updated maps they may have a lot more information. Plus you can open the map and see a lot more and be able to plan better.

    #8942
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    If you want paper maps with every road including dirt I suggest these:

    http://shop.delorme.com/OA_HTML/DELibeCCtpSctDspRte.jsp?section=10096

    I used them for years (before GPS) and they got me there and back again.

    #8943
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Hmm, some posts aren’t showing up.

    Check with your local county offices, plat map books are a great resource.
    Landowners names, buildings, boundaries, and they can generally tell you about absentee landowners.

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