Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #42776
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    After spending a week with my father on a boat, I have a better understanding of how intigrating a team member with a disability can affect the outcome of a team function. My father has lost 90% of his hearing and is suffering from macular degeneration. Additionally he is an elderly man limiting his physical capabilities.

    Before we were on the boat my main concern was that his balance, strength and endurance would not be sufficient and he would be a danger to himself. After the first day it became apparent that his lack of hearing was the greatest impediment to his and the boats safety. Every time a situation occurred that all hands needed to communicate together, his lack of hearing caused chaos. Not only could he not hear instructions, but he instructed other crew members to do the wrong thing. In this situation no one was injured or property damaged, however in a SHTF scenario the outcome would be very different without considerable intervention BEFORE hand.

    #42787
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    This is one of those touchy subjects.
    As one to whom middle age has not been the kindest, I remind everyone that they can be in the same boat (figuratively or literally) in a split second.
    A couple of years ago my plans, methods and abilities changed after a stupid fall.
    It happens, plan ahead.

    #42788
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly, Really sorry to hear that you suffered a serious injury.

    #42790
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Serious is a matter of opinion.
    Life changing, certainly.

    My BOB used to weigh much more, now 35lbs is pushing it for any length of time.
    I used to drag critters out whole, now they come out in chunks.
    Long drives were normal and fun, now every two hours or less its time for a walk.
    Adapt, improvise, overcome. Always cheat.

    Years ago I taught people how to fight, hands on arrest control.
    Now its fight ending quick kill only. The messing around being nice is too risky.

    I taught a ccw class recently with a one legged customer. He uses crutches, has for 40 years. But for him, we adapted the methods and styles to fit his needs.
    Minor things like spare mag placement, holster selection, become critical when you start having to do things differently.

    #42791
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Yes, health circumstances can change quickly, or they can come slowly, but the aging process happens to all of us who are fortunate to live long enough. I don’t have as much energy or strength as I had even a decade ago but I’m doing pretty good on a comparative basis for a guy in his 60’s. My wife on the other hand hasn’t aged as well. Arthritis, asthma, bad knees, feet problems, and just yesterday she learned she has cataracts. This is why I say we are where we are. Come SHTF she’s not going to do the hard work outside but she can do other things that need doing. Everyone is in a position to contribute in some fashion.

    #42793
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    74 – That pretty much is where I am today. 28 years of using loud stuff and using loud transportation (helo’s etc etc) has me hearing crickets!
    Whirlibird – Yep. Basically many years of thinking only Kryptonite can hurt me has left me with a screwed up back and left leg. Thus my shooting style is different. I still could qual as marksman.
    Our group does not have anyone below the age of 55 years old. Each of us have different problems so we lean harder on each other to get certain things done. Where one of us is weak another is strong.
    As the saying goes: I am too dam* old to fight you anymore so I will just kill you!
    Throwing on a mask, 40 pound Alice Pack and running a mile now is impossible. So we plan and plan and plan.
    Woke up breathing so everything else is gravy!
    Robin

    #42795
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    74, My father is the same, 85 years old so I will have to be there for him when the shtf. Mother is the same 83. I will move them to my house when the shtf and find the thinks they can do to help out with the family.

    I still find them as an asset.

    #42798
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Freedom, My father is basically he same age. His mobility is ok for his age but he will need help on a fast hike like a BO. He rides a bicycle a few times a week so I’m thinking he could handle a modified moped for off road situations to save his energy. I eould consider an atv utility type vehicle but they need wider trails.

    #42800
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Don’t discount people with disabilities. My husband has plenty (double leg amputee etc) but he still has great organizational and strategical defense skills. Cool in a crisis (did high-risk security for years for an international company.) Lots of valuable experience in dealing with confrontational/problem people. Good marksman and VERY knowledgeable about guns. Reloads. Hunts. Gardens. Great planner, which we do (as stated above) rather than horse our way through a problem. We make a great team and it will stay that way when things go down. I can trust him with my life. Like he often says, “I have lost my legs, not my brain…”

    #42801
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I like your post Wild.

    #42803
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    This subject is near and dear to my heart. My wife was born with cerebral palsy. It is a mild case compared to others I have seen but she is my hero none the less. She gets up every day and lives a normal life. She is a mother of 3 and takes great care of us all. One of my biggest fears is if we ever have to run. It will not be much of an option for her. I am working on a cart I could pull her in right now but rough terrain or a hasty retreat would be disastrous. My 8 yr old nephew also has Downs syndrome. Man I love that kid. I am fortunate to have a large family team. Both my father and mother in law are in good health though dad has slowed a bit due to his heart. He also is a very good shot.My bro in law is not someone I would want to run into in a dark ally(195 and some MMA training). His wife is able bodied as well. My two older kids will be of great help too. I guess I have already settled it in my mind, if we ever have to run I will just have to be meaner, nastier and more divisive than our threat in order to give the rest of the family time to get out.

    #42825
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Matt,
    What are you using as parameters in your design? I have been contemplating having a cart for loads but haven’t settled on a design. I have a 2 wheeled wagon that is designed for my garden tractor but it is about 3.5′ wide. The wheels are wide low pressure type that can go through soft stuff but tall obstacles are a problem. I’m thinking 26″ MT bike wheels would be better.

    #42827
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    74, Matt,
    thanks for raising the issue. I’m trying to figure out how I could transport my wife without a motor vehicle in a SHTF situation. I hope we don’t get to that need, but count it possible. She currently has a wound on her ankle, healing slowly, making it extremely painful to walk, until it closes. At certain large stores, she’s able to use those electric carts; at an airport, we need a wheelchair. Around the house, she uses a cane.

    I ride a bicycle some of the time & could travel on one if I needed to, but she needs to avoid articulating her ankle, for the time being. I’ve been thinking of equipping a wheelchair with 26″ pneumatic wheels, extra rack(s), bike- and harness-towing tongues, and extended rear push/guide-handles. If it wasn’t needed for wheelchair duty, it would still be a decent rough-country cart. Supplies and equipment for continued living could be carried without having to schlep it all on our backs.

    I’ll be interested to read more about your design, Matt.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #42829
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    We were staying in a motel and heard a customer complaining his wife couldn’t get her 500 pound cart wheelchair over the 2 inch door threshold.

    #42833
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Really I am copying the old tree lounger deer stand design. I had one years ago and gave it to my cousin(why did I do that?) during a time when I was so busy working I didn’t have time to hunt much less be home. The company is no longer in business and there are some cheap Chi knock offs but I want to play with it a little bit. The original design was collapsible and could be carried like a backpack. I want to modify it where I can attach a shoulder harness to pull it like a rickshaw but also be able to swap a piece or 2 out and pull it with a bike. Angle and elevation will be important in order to accommodate for bum clearance of the passenger. Wheels will be bicycle tires as they are light and provide good ground clearance. Replacement tubes are pretty cheap, don’t take up much space and have other uses. The other great thing about bike tires is they are pretty easy to break down by hand or with minimal tools. There are several hand pumps that are pretty light and would do the job to inflate the tires. Here is a picture of the original tree lounger.

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.