Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #43354
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Alarm went off this morning about 3 am. The alarm in my head. Something different woke me and it was the kind of coming awake that different than normal. Thought that was over but guess not.
    So I come to the SHTF Forum to catch up on things. Found myself then going to Selco’s Blog and reading some of his past comments. Second article I read was “Sweets and Treat.” As I was reading I was also remembering stuff I would do to “treat” my team when we were away on assignment for a long time.
    First thing I would miss is fresh vegetables and then it was fresh milk. Next thing I would miss is sleep. That happened a lot! We would go several months and work 20 hours a day. One day just led to another of the SOS (Same old Stuff.) A couple of weeks of those type of days just left me numb. Mental conditioning took over and yes,
    things did get accomplished.

    When it got to that point I would break into my “stash.”

    Before we took off for a job I would buy a bunch of “hard” candy, cards and joke gifts. I knew of places to hide the goodies in the various equipment cases we used.

    My new guys and myself worked the 12 hour night watch. The more experienced folks worked the day hours. I did not worry about them as they had lots of folks to call on if things went ugly. So at night I had more time to teach the new guys. We also had time to place “tricks” for the day folks. One thing I would do is to hide the candy from my stash in places where I knew someone would find it. Take a gag gift and hide it where only my boss would find it. One thing was a “flying Monkey.” It was a monkey with a cape on its back. You could “shoot” it across the room. Was like using a sling shot but you let it fly! We would wait until the early morning hours and then send it flying across the room. It made a screeching sound as it “flew.”

    “Sweets and Treats” – it is the simple things that count sometimes.

    Robin

    #43355
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    PS…….Selco, I think I also ate some of those “chocolate” things. We called them “hockey pucks.” Small, round objects that were called cakes. At least it was chocolate!

    #43356
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I have read numerous times that it is good to include some treats in your preps stash as a means to lift spirits or have a small celebration during stressful times. I know I have some good stuff tucked away!

    #43357
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Robin ,
    I dont know what you do , but there is no way in hell I would work those kind of hours . I have never let any job interfere with having a life , and unless your in a war or other life threatening situation…………….no legit need to work 20 hours a day . Hats off to you .
    MountainBiker ,
    I do that , just because I like sweets , even camping or backpacking , I small bag of Jolly Ranchers or other things makes a bad day much less bad ……………….I also carry a large flask full of rye or vodka , between the two , no worries lol .
    Drunk redneck cowboy with guns ……………..stay away ! YEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEHAWWWWW!!!!!

    #43358
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Tolik, it was part of the job. Retired from the Navy in 1997 and that was the end of that. Would not even try that again.
    Robin

    #43369
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Tolik, it was part of the job. Retired from the Navy in 1997 and that was the end of that. Would not even try that again.

    Ah, yes…. The things we do (or did) when we thought working for the government was honorable, and that we could make a difference …. BTDT (Been There, Done That). “Quoth the raven, ‘Never more.'”

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #43381
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    A big part of why I retired at 60 was because I was burnt out in large part from working too many hours for too many years. Though I am still very busy between my three part time jobs, maintaining a large property, and my hobbies/interests, I do it at a more relaxed pace and I do it more or less in charge of my schedule. Being able to control my schedule has made all the difference.

    And I feel no guilt whatsoever for indulging my sweet tooth.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.