Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • #43486
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I see this as something that is happening more and more. Police are being killed for just being police officers. Some are race related like this one, a black man kills a white police officer. I am seeing more police officers not wanting to be police officers anymore because of the race wars that are going on. I see this all heading into a race war that has been started by O him self.

    Suspect arrested, to be charged in killing of Texas county sheriff’s deputy

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/08/29/sheriff-deputy-reportedly-shot-in-texas/

    #43487
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    It’ll be revealing to see who stands up for the cowardly murderer. My guess: only some second tier mouthpiece for “The Nation of Islam.” I don’t expect Calypso Louie to have the stones to personally boast in public, that that’s what he’s been urging blacks to do. (If he does, and gets away with thus inciting murder, that’ll tell me a lot about the political stage we’re at, all by itself.) Sharptongue and HiJackson will mumble some generalized bafflegab about the results of “injustice,” and let it go at that.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #43488
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Its too bad it had to come to things like that , and I dont believe in it unless its in self defense ………..and YES there are times you have the god given right to defend yourself against the authorities . This was clearly a cowardly act . Here is the thing , police forces all over the nation are out of control , race bull$hit aside , they are becoming as hated as the common criminal is to the guy on the street . There was a time when I was a strong supporter of the anti constitutional Fascist puppets , but that was a different era . In that time , you had peace officers that didnt interfere with people unless it was so far out , they had to step in . They knew people by name , and were invited as friends to cook outs , etc. Now they are tought that the American citizen is below them , or has that attitude , they are abusive and criminal in many situations , they are simply predators instead of the good guys . Some of the abuses of the Constitution and human dignity that happens in this country on a daily basis , doesnt even happen in Russia , its BAD ! I dont agree with what happened , but at the same time , when the American people look at the cops the SAME way they look at a gang member , there is a problem , and the American people didnt create the problem ………….they did . If the suspects are found guilty , I hope they get the death penalty . Just Sayin

    #43489
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    when the American people look at the cops the SAME way they look at a gang member , there is a problem , and the American people didnt create the problem ………….they did . Just Sayin

    Tolik, that’s “just sayin'” a mouthful. I agree that it would be (is?) a problem if “the American people look at the cops the SAME way they look at a gang member,” but I believe that most of “the American people” would still be far more likely to call the cops, when they are the victims of crime, than any of the gangs they know.

    Have a few bad cops overstepped their authority? Yes. Have some poorly-, or wrongly-trained cops been trigger-happy, willing to kill first, and analyze/apologize later? Yes. Have some departments “closed ranks,” and covered for their out-of-line co-workers? Yes. But the pertinent question is: for whom do these LEOs and their employing agencies work? If you said, “the American people,” paste a gold star on your chart.

    So, how much effort have “the American people” put into straightening out their misbehaving employees? If you said that most of it was online grumbling, or letters to the editor, or occasionally, writing to some elected official, get another gold star. Actually, most of the bad things governments have done to their alleged “employers” have yet to be fully appreciated, and while their plans involve using the police forces (and likely, the military) to keep “the American people” suppressed long enough to get away with what they have stolen, cops are stuck in the middle, owing some kind of vaguely defined duty to those whose taxes pay their salaries, yet being under the more direct command of those who, increasingly, are ripping everyone else off.

    Why do you think it has become so necessary to prepare for the political/social/economic collapse you see coming? When “the American people” retired from the field of actively monitoring, and correcting their governments, they created a power vacuum. A people, the majority of whom refuse to put in the effort to learn what is being done in their name, with the taxes they provide — who accept blather and lies, because it’s easier than research and campaigning, who vote for people who abuse them because they simply recognize the name — get what they get. Shooting the piano player is a cowardly substitute for learning to play a different tune on the instrument yourself.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #43493
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Good thoughts, Tec. I also have not heard widespread equation of law enforcement with gangs. Am I personally less trusting of them in the past quite a few years? Sadly, yes. But for every bad cop I’ve come across, I’ve had multiple positive experiences. The problem (thus the seeds of distrust) is that we just don’t initially know which ones are going to be the problem, power-hungry cops. And like the military, their leadership has become corrupted, all too often. Gummint is trying to drum out the good ones, and replace them with puppets.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #43497
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I haven’t ever had many interactions with police but those few I have had did not include any inappropriate behavior. Similarly I haven’t ever lived anywhere where the police were viewed negatively. When I lived in MA and had applied for a concealed carry license, the Police Chief saw me one day and stopped to apologize for my application having gotten delayed. Last winter on a bitterly cold night my wife was down in our old town in MA and her car broke down. A cop came and offered to help. Her car started up again and he offered to follow her to her destination to make sure she was OK. Last year she was in Albuquerque, NM with a friend and stopped to shop someplace close to the store’s closing time. When they were getting back in the car and taking their time arranging packages and talking up a storm, a cop stopped to make sure they were OK and warned them the neighborhood they were in wasn’t safe at night. My take is that most police are just doing the best they can and that when you are polite and respectful to them they will be polite and respectful in return. No different than anyone else you interact with. All that said, I know there are a-holes, power-hungry, and just plain corrupt people on police forces and I think all police should wear cameras to record interactions. Those that turn the cameras off or abuse their power should be criminally charged, but I for one will gladly take my chances with the police over gangs.

    I know that the larger the setting the more difficult it is to have any impact on govt but people in communities where the police are out of control or where civil asset forfeiture or the issuance of civil citations is out of control, people can run candidates for office who will change it. The old maxim of the squeaky wheel gets the grease comes to mind. Blacks, Muslims, and others are using that tactic in cities and towns across the nation and winning many battles as a result.

    #43509
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    12 Officers murdered since August 20th.

    Any other group of people, except lawyers and the public outcry would be enormous.

    But its just cops.

    People make negative comments about the blue blood, the brootherhood of the badge, etc, and why cops stand together and apart.

    Those 12 deaths illustrate why.
    We know our brothers ans sisters behind the badge will be there for us.
    Will kill themselves coming to our aid.
    When all others stand by and do nothing,
    They are coming.

    And good cop, or bad cop, every family has a few, they will be there for one another.
    For their families, like the entire departments that just showed up to take fallen officers kids to their first day of school.
    Or where entire shifts donate their overtime/comptime to cover the pay lost when a fellow officer is taking his wife for medical treatment and is out of vacation and paid leave.

    I hear a lot of complaining and negativity about cops, but what I don’t hear is those complainers stepping up to do the job.
    Its a terrible job, and the fact that some 800, 000 brave souls step up and do it, ruining marriages, missing kids programs, taking years off their lives, living with great mental scars from what they’ve seen, is a testament to those who step up and stand in the breach. Ready to do violence on your behalf. The sheepdogs.

    Hats off, heads bowed for the fallen, god speed.
    You’ve already spent your time in hades.

    #43510
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “When all others stand by and do nothing”
    I don’t have an issue with most of your comment (although it brings to light another problematic social division). However the above quote is truly unfair in that LE will not allow anyone else to be physically involved. Additionally I think most “normal” people are deeply concerned with the assassination of police officers.

    #43511
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Here is another police officer gun down.

    ‘Blue and Brave': Illinois town rallies around police as search for officer’s killer goes on

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/09/02/manhunt-on-for-gunman-after-cop-reportedly-killed-in-chicago/

    #43512
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    “When all others stand by and do nothing”
    I don’t have an issue with most of your comment (although it brings to light another problematic social division). However the above quote is truly unfair in that LE will not allow anyone else to be physically involved. Additionally I think most “normal” people are deeply concerned with the assassination of police officers.

    Those standing and taking videos of the female officer who was beaten in the head with a chain before shooting her attacker come immediately to mind.

    Those brave souls who took down the shooter down south recently, cuffing him despite his being armed and calling for help on the officers radio are the exception nowadays.

    There’s allowing, taking on the legal and moral responsibility for that person, and then there’s accepting it when the excrement hits the rotary impeller device. In the middle of a fight, its a tough call.

    In that fight, “l” don’t know who’s side you are on, good guy or bad.
    Wearing a badge? I know.

    #43513
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly, Really I believe you’re painting with to big of a brush. On the other hand it’s not clear to me what you want the public to do for LE.

    #43514
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    My grandfather fought in WWI, my father fought in WWII. When my generation’s war came along (Vietnam), things happened that would rarely if EVER have happened to my grandfather or father. Soldiers were spit on, called baby killers, and worse. In ROTC, one cadet that had his heart set on becoming a pilot, had a large chunk of concrete planted in his forehead as the “protesters” rushed down the stairs into the ROTC offices in the basement of the building where they were housed. Red paint was thrown on uniforms on Tuesdays during drill ceremonies, as the ugliest of taunts were thrown at us. Meanwhile, my friend did recover from the brain injury, but of course could never be allowed to fly because of it. Having some reasonably good photography skills and fairly decent equipment at the time, I ended up taking evidence photos with a telephoto lens I owned, and was later called into federal court to testify against some of the worst of the “protesters” (the ones that caused physical damage to both property and persons). I was terrified after being required by the judge to give not only my name, but my home address in open court. One might hopefully forgive me for having had a less-than-positive view of society back in the late 60s and early 1970.

    Was everyone that way? Of course not. But the tide had shifted, and those that signed up to serve our nation, as we saw it, were no longer almost universally looked at with admiration and appreciation. It’s a bit hard to maintain a rosy, positive attitude when you’re the recipient of unwarranted attacks (and any attack on the mass because of the actions of a few is unwarranted). So what did we do on Tuesdays? We began incorporating our own taunts back at the protesters as we marched – in the form of cadence calls: “We’re gonna RAPE — KILL — BURN — and PLUNDER, gonna RAPE — KILL — BURN — and PLUNDER, ….

    Like the military, police work has never been a high money-maker. (Don’t ANYbody throw in some comment about cops on the take! You know that’s not the point.) And if Whirlibird’s 800,000 figure is accurate, that’s even well below the 1-2% of Americans that go into the military. So no, I don’t think that Whirlibird is using any broader of a brush than is being used by far too many in society against law enforcement. A prominent sub-group of blacks are murdering, drug-dealing thugs, threatening to wipe out whites – so all blacks are bad. A few Iranian leaders vocally voice death to America and Israel, so all Iranians are our enemies and worthy of being turned into a sea of glass by one of our own nukes. And like the rest of society from which police are recruited, a percentage of them do bad things that would have been almost unheard of 50 years ago, so all cops are bad and to be untrusted and even assassinated. Of course, we used to be able to leave our doors unlocked when we weren’t home when many of us were kids, so all of society is now bad too. People who only see others painting with broad brushes, like those that live in glass houses, need to remember that things work both ways – and are sometimes understandable.

    I also appreciate his “inside” view of entire shifts stepping up to the plate to help fellow officers that were out of leave time and money, for example. A community can hold a candlelight vigil, and that’s good and heart felt. But then everybody goes home, and everybody feels better for having “done” something – while the widow(er) and kids go back home to a very lonely house with memories of someone that won’t be coming back through the door ever again, perhaps with the memory of the videos taken of their loved one’s murder with no one coming into that same video to help stop it. Broad brush? Maybe not, when this cr@p was almost unheard of 50 years ago. Back then, the perps would have been dead BEFORE the backup units got there – thanks to the people back then that refused to be just bystanders, let alone cheerleaders for the perps. Now days, I would be entirely unsurprised if the three young men that stopped the massacre on the French train end up being sued by the jihadi for his injuries, since they proudly admitted to having inflicted plenty of physical damage on him. The world needs many more of them – and they’re no longer plentiful.

    As I said in another post, my initial trust level today is lower than it was 20 years ago with police. Do I expect something to go bad? No, and generally it’s still a positive (and welcome) experience. But I’m much more on the lookout for it – because I know that the society from which they’re coming has also gone down hill, and I’m more cautious in society as well. I also know that an increasing number of cops are also combat vets – and I’ve dealt with those folks very up close and very personally in a professional capacity, and it concerns me. I KNOW some that went into law enforcement, and I cringe. So yes, there are factors today that simply didn’t exist 20-30 years ago – both with police and with society in general. Back then I never considered concealed carry, nor did my wife. Now the credit card advertising phrase, “Don’t leave home without it,” is a general rule without even much conscious thought anymore. Call that a broad brush too, perhaps…. When one is constantly being slapped with one, a master artist’s fine-tipped brush doesn’t seem like much of a defense.

    As a final comment, I have a great deal of gratitude for those, like Whirlibird, that have stepped up and served. A good friend of mine (a now-retired high ranking enlisted Ranger) finally was convinced to go through a program called Save a Warrior out in Malibu, CA. It quite possibly saved both his family and his life. With 22 veteran suicides every day, that program has not lost a single “graduate” in its several years of operation. It’s frankly a miracle program, doing things in five days that psychologists and psychiatrists haven’t been able to do for combat vets with years of therapy and medications. There’s no charge to the vets for the program, either. But guess who else they allow into the program: first responders like police and firemen. Why? Because they understand what those guys (and women) also go through, that most have no clue about.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #43515
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    My semi-apology for the length of the prior post – a nerve got triggered. But that nerve still overrides my consideration for removing or significantly shortening the post. Take it or leave it. Some things just need to be gotten out, appreciated or not. As for me and my house, we will always appreciate military, law enforcement, and first responders above almost any other profession – and stand with them (the bad apples among them notwithstanding), however inadequate that support may be.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #43516
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    GS,
    I think your post goes to proving my point not against it. “ALL” is inclusive without limitations. I’m not deriding Whirly’s post or LE. I think lots of people would help the police if they were allowed. The fact that we live with a criminal element as part of society, and some vocal agitators doesn’t mean no one will stand with LE. So yes I think Whirly is casting aspersions on us all when he says “all others”. Like it’s us against them.

    #43517
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    When a video shows nobody coming to the aid of a fallen cop, then by definition “all” of those around are “stand[ing] by and doing nothing.” Whirlibird very specifically clarified that in his follow up response when he mentioned, “Those brave souls who took down the shooter down south recently, cuffing him despite his being armed and calling for help on the officers radio are the exception nowadays.” He clearly acknowledged exceptions. Why then are you taking it personally and holding on to the notion of “all” being universally inclusive, as opposed to situationally accurate in too many cases?

    This past Sunday, I heard a talk in which the speaker mentioned the concept of listening with one’s heart, not just one’s head. We can pick out words and attribute our own meaning to them – and perhaps be technically correct. But we can also listen with our hearts, trying in some way to understand what’s behind the words, and sometimes those words then take on an entirely different meaning. Personally, I understand why the Save a Warrior program chooses to bring in LE and other first responders, and not just limit their incredible program to military vets only. If one hasn’t been there personally, one cannot truly understand, regardless of how many such people they’ve known, talked with, interviewed, treated, etc. But they can at least understand that they don’t understand….

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

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