Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
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  • #37799
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Did you like the bugging out lesson?
    Feel free to ask questions and provide feedback.

    #37807
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Well said, an excellent article. Many things to ponder that stem from what was said there.

    A couple of thoughts (that probably run on).

    Much is going to depend on where you are and when SHTF.

    For example, bugging out in Iowa during February is different completely than Western Wyoming. The difference in woods/forests to start, let alone the weather. Flatland vs mountains, water/no water, food sources are completely different. The same applies to other parts of the world.

    Around here (Wyoming), competition for good sites, with water, will be a major consideration, just like the weather.

    Contrast that to Iowa where there are woods but few ‘forests’ as such. Much smaller areas to work with but water and food sources much easier to deal with, assuming one is foraging.

    The attitude of the locals is another consideration, there is a significant difference between New Yorkers and Iowans. That societal facade is definitely more prevalent in different areas. Other areas, people are more genuine and willing to help.

    And the difference in gear is always a concern.
    The chances of needing a -20f sleeping bag in Florida is slim, but here its a requirement. Fishing gear? A Hawaiian sling, mask and snorkel aren’t going to do me any good, but a gill net and yoyo reels can be repurposed for small game and birds.

    Timing? Always the hardest part.
    Too early and you may not need to have gone at all.
    Too late, you may not be able to get where you want or need to go.
    Again, timing is a killer on many levels.
    Here in the middle of winter, there are places you aren’t going without a snow machine. At all.
    And is this a short term or long term situation? Do you need to pack bug spray and snowshoes?

    Bug out locations, we should all have one or more.
    Hopefully its private property we own to avoid public land issues, first come first served as it were.
    But it has to have certain things, water is critical.

    It may seem like I’m harping about water, but living in semi desert areas for years makes me appreciate a good water source.
    Some of us have easy access to water year around. Others have to plan every glass of water in advance, and that’s now let alone during a crisis.

    And food. Not just how much or what, but how are you going to prepare it? Woodstove, open fire, gas ring? That cast iron dutch oven may weigh a ton but may be one of the best options for cooking long term you have in a primitive situation.

    Much of the gear that one has prepositioned at a BOL is the same as a vehicle BO. Both are potentially able to be stolen but are much better than your ‘BOB’ gear and therefore need a look by a jaundiced eye. Again that cast iron dutch oven, large stainless cooking pots, saws, axes, mauls, wedges, shovels, all that “Pioneer” gear. Yes you can go out and ‘coppic’ your firewood, but actual firewood lasts longer and burns more evenly. You can build a shelter that stands up to the elements rather than a flimsy and cold tent. And the longer the situation, the better you need. Wickiup, lean-to, cabin, house? The number of people plays heavily into this.

    You have to decide what you need now and for time to come.
    Location, gear, people. All critical choices.

    #37808
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Selco,
    I think your logic and the presentation of your ideas is really clear in this article. Thanks for a great piece of work.

    #37809
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly,
    I like the list of questions and scenarios that you laid out. Of course that is were the real work in planning comes in. I believe that plans for walking with your gear have to be ultimately included as the first & last resort for bugging out, with vehicles as a hopeful “if”.

    #37810
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks Selco. Well done. Helpful ideas for folks confronting the issue.

    Whirlibird, spent couple years near Laramie. I grew very fond of ol’ Wyoming.

    #37823
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thanks.
    I absolutely agree that it is very personal thing, I mean there are so many variables that we actually need to be very flexible and ready to adapt in all areas of our attitude. Small thing can change complete plan, or force you to make new plan “as you go”.
    Some things that may work in one area can get you in trouble in another place.

    #37827
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    This is going to be an epic series on bugout. I’m going to make a special effort to read it all.
    Questions thats tough. There are to many to anticipate.
    Telling the neighbors or not. How much secrecy to maintain.
    How to explain an absence. Will they loot the minute you leave.
    Most opportune time of day. morning or night. Snow rain or cold.
    Best weapon .308 or shotgun, pistol AK.
    Mapping abandoned houses as stopover locations.
    Whether to use a self storage rental as a cache.
    Use of electronics. cell phone, satelite phone. ipad.
    Inviting friends and convoys.
    WCS …leaving with nothing but the clothes on your back.

    #37831
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “Telling the neighbors or not. How much secrecy to maintain.
    How to explain an absence. Will they loot the minute you leave.”- Brulen

    If your leaving under duress they probably will be in trouble as well. I can see where they might want to go with you, and when you say no they will follow you like a lost dog.

    Leaving good supplies behind would stink, but staying and potentially dying would be worse. Planning a cache close to the house for this purpose seems like a good idea.

    #37833
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    74 There you go. You just brought up a point I hadn’t thought about. Somebody hopping in their vehicle and following me. What to do. And whats worse it might be someone I know and don’t dislike but would consider him to be a unnecessary risk. Go to plan D immediately. Ditch the dog. How and where would be the question. Some preplanning involved. Caltrops maybe. Possibly something as simple as stopping the vehicle and leaving it. After a while he would give up. But that would violate the speed is of the essence principle.

    #37837
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Two things in the article really are very important. The bug out timing and the use of family members in photo of cache locations.
    The article is very well planned.
    Thanks
    Robin

    #37838
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Excellent presentation Selco. The questions that come to me mostly deal with the caching of supplies. If I had caches buried last summer and SHTF now, they’d be buried under a couple feet of snow and then deeply frozen ground beneath that. It might be possible to find certain partially sheltered spots in the woods or abandoned structures but that leads me to the second question. How do you secretly bury supplies on other people’s property? Or for that matter on public property undetected?

    #37840
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Scenery does change with the seasons. As Selco said, take pictures of different family members next to a stash. Include in the picture things that will not change: telephone poles that you put a slash of paint. Telephone junction boxes. Rural road signs and other road side signs that will not change (church, restaurant, gas stations) are other items to include in a photo.
    Another idea for photos is using the “Hobo Code”

    http://www.symbols.com/category/52

    Robin

    #37857
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MtB,
    I have problems with the same issues. I think the reluctance to use other people’s property stems from your normalcy & ethical views. It could be uncomfortable explaining your presence while digging a hole to a land owner. Get your ticket and go straight to court for trespassing. On public land your cache is open to discovery. Where I live if you’re caught digging and disturbing the habitat your getting a big fine. Avoiding observation is difficult around theze parts.

    #37863
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Absentee landowners are the best, those that are either snowbirds or just left.
    Go down to your county offices and get a land plat map or book.
    This tells you who owns what.
    And often their mailing address.

    Caching in various locations can be easy or the most amazing chore. Much depends on the climate and weather.

    But in general you want to be far enough off the beaten path that being observed is unlikely. The last cache I helped with had 10- 5 gallon buckets in it. All the gear was vacuum packed in mylar and both nitrogen and O2 absorbers were used. Overkill perhaps, but this is a long term cache. 20+ years.

    A variety of old mining junk is scattered through the area so detection is unlikely, and the junk is used to open the cache itself, anchoring off one piece to slide the cover off.

    Another used a series of SDR tubes to hold the inner tubes, a bit of wasted space and pricey, the owner can uncap the tubes and move the contents with minimal effort when he changes areas. This happens about every year, thanks to his job.

    Depending on your area, that nosey neighbor may be an anti gunner, who better to store stuff for us? One friend ended up helping the nosey neighbor put in a birdwatching bench out in the back 20.
    She actually paid him to prep the land.
    The cache is under 3″ of concrete, shaped like real stone with appropriate cuts and cracks for removal later if needed.
    The site overlooks his property so he knows if anything is happening to it and and can act accordingly.

    #37891
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly, your just so spoiled out there. There is a house or some occupied building no more then every 100 yards around here. If I drive 30 miles I can get to somewhere “off the beaten path” only I’ll run into hikers or some such busy bodies out in the woods.

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