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  • #47189
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7
    #47191
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Interesting concept. Very original. I have my doubts about durability in a cold climate. Even assuming a proper foundation so as to preclude frost heaves, I’m thinking the ongoing freeze thaw cycle will start to crack the external part of the bottles and also wreak havoc with all that mortar. However, both issues might be fully manageable with ongoing maintenance such as any cold climate brick structure requires.

    #47193
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I like the concept, but the time it would take to fill each bottle is staggering. Even with some form of automated funnel, handling each one an extra time would double the time of using a pre- made item.

    #47194
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    I agree on the cold climate aspect of it. Just a little bit of moisture with just a little below 32°F, and a lot of destruction starts happening at almost imperceptible levels (at first). Roads up north are more than adequate testimony to that principle. I’m also aware of an absolutely beautiful and expensive marble floor that has to be entirely replaced after only four years. Reason? Improper storage of the tiles between manufacturing of the tiles and their installation (i.e. moisture and freezing temperatures). The beautiful variations in the marble had tiny bits of water seep into them, the water froze, creating additional tiny cracks – repeat the cycle more than once, and now whole chunks are seeming to chip off the top of the previously (seemingly) mirror-smooth surface. One would have to do quite a job of water-proofing this kind of structure to avoid that, given the huge amount of mortar and concrete involved.

    As far as bullets and fire-proofing, I’m not sure I’d trust that, either. Windows work just fine for penetration by gas or flash-bangs, as well as entry. As for fire, a good interior fire (where most start) would start melting the bottles. I expect the structural integrity would substantially change.

    Now if one doesn’t care about conforming to a neighborhood cookie-cutter look, and they don’t expect to be hit with a .50 cal assault, this would certainly last quite a while in at least some climates, I suspect, and would be much cheaper than a stick-and-brick house.

    74, I suspect something could be rigged up with multiple funnels, using sand as recommended. Spilled sand around the bottles could be easily recycled into the next batch of bottles. But that’s still a very large number of bottles. I counted a bit over 2000 bottles just from the edge of the window over to the first column on the right side of the photo, assuming the wall extends all the way up to the top of the columns. And that stretch, not including the window, could not be more than 1/5 of the entire structure around, thus at least 10,000 bottles for a very small house. That would probably be a bit more than a morning project just filling them (!!). At maybe a minute per bottle, to include washing each bottle (critter attraction), setting it up for filling, screwing on the cap (which would have to be acquired since most discarded bottles don’t have the caps), then moving them out of the way for the next batch – and 10,000 bottles works out to about 167 hours just for preparing and filling them if they average a minute each – just a S.W.A.G. (Scientific Wild Ass Guess).

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #47196
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I would like a bullet proof, fire proof house. Where I live now is anything but either of those. I did see a Nike missile base for sale. They have old underground missile silos that can be used for a BOL.

    #47198
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Yeah, I thought about an old missile silo myself once, but then had 2nd thoughts very quickly. The idea of being entirely underground, with only one vertical way up or down, seems very insecure (and unsafe) to me – easy attack down the hole, and no alternate way to escape. I’d have to have a tunnel system built that came out at quite a distance from the underground structure. Now – if they ever want to sell HQ NORAD …. (I was able to visit inside the old mountainside site at Westover AFB, MA, back during a college ROTC trip and often wondered what happened to that. I read once that the Federal Reserve took it over and stored money and records there for a while.)

    My preference would be an underground house on the side of a mountain or at least very large hill or ridge, or else on a high riverbank. We know someone that used to have an underground house right on the high side of the Snake River in Idaho, and from the road that ran right past it, there was absolutely zero indication that there was a house there – it was grass covered. They didn’t need a chimney, since heat wasn’t much of an issue in the winter, even with power out for a while. While they didn’t apparently plan for a long term outage, a chimney could be easily camouflaged if necessary (except for the smoke coming out of the “ground” when in use). It was a moderately good sized house (I think nearly 1800 square feet if I remember right), needed no air conditioning in the summer at all, and the lights and kitchen heat took care of all their winter heating (I don’t remember how they took care of plumbing stacks or a kitchen vent – I just remember as I approached it, I was amazed at the total lack of clue that the slight rise in the land was actually a house – other than the driveway that went along side and disappeared “into the river.” I’d LOVE to have something like that, putting the window-side of the house facing south (more winter heat potential), and also giving good visibility to everything except right on top of the house. (The dummies ended up putting a 2nd story on the house, ran out of money, and never had the benefits of EITHER structure again – they had to sell it.)

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #47199
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    LOL, GS watch the video. This is strictly for people with no other obligations.

    #47201
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    ROFL! No, I hadn’t watched the video. I definitely see what you mean. I think we’ve got just a few more obligations that supersede this one, unless we don’t plan on moving in until around age 85 or so. And we don’t own any slaves, or have young children we can use in the dark to hopefully avoid child labor law violations. I think the word “impractical” comes to mind…. :-)

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #47202
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    GS,
    In no way do I want a bunker. I have a basement death trap now. It’s pretty much bullet proof, but it’s escape proof as well. For now anyway. I could fix that but I’d need the crew working in the video to dig a trench.

    #47203
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    as for cold climate rammed earth houses are pretty much the same and they work in cold areas or you could do an earthship design.

    as for above ground structural …use shipping containers…. then 4 inches of 3/4 minus gravel then 7 inches of spray foam. You can get a container for 2500 and to do rest is fast if you know what to do with plasma cutter and welder. and you get a r 60 house at 320sf per container.

    you use the sheets you cut of inside areas to plate the outside walls you get a 12 inch all sandwich 1/8 steel 4 inches of gravel 1/8 steel 7 inches spray foam then your finish.

    A slightly different version quarried basalt 12-8 inches thick then 7 inches spray foam then 1/8 steel 6 inches of gravel then 1/8 steel painted i use the steel a a thermo conductor to help heat the house. but the stone work is pricey but you have your own castle ha ha.

    #47206
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    namelus, that’s intriguing. Are there any plans/photos available anywhere? I don’t have all the skills necessary, but something inside me is still wanting to find out more. I know people have used shipping containers, but you have more detail and a more complete idea, obviously, and it got me interested.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #47210
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    Yeah, namelus, I’d also like to see plans or photos of the shipping container/gravel and the basalt/steel/gravel structures. As for the bottlebrick structures, I think they’d be best suited to warm, relatively dry locations. But, heck, if I had tens of thousands of empty water or soda bottles, lots of dry, fine-grained soil, and a crew of several dozen people to work for cheap, I might try it. Single-handed though, it might take the rest of my life.

    I did get to see the beginnings of what enough plastic bottles, time, and money could produce, though not a land-based structure. I don’t know if the Plastiki ever made news outside of San Francisco, and Sydney, but young Mr. de Rothschild was, for a time, one of my employer’s tenants, and it became necessary to move his Plastiki operation from one part of the piershed to another, so I was one of the party that went to meet him and lay out the new location.

    Having seen how sturdy a rammed earth wall is, I’d be more inclined to use soil to build that type of structure, if the soil was clayey enough, and the foundation could be kept dry.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #47256
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    no photos yet can get some later this year

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