Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #37261
    Profile photo of CharlieTango
    CharlieTango
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    One of the biggest changes to my prepping lately is that I have significantly changed what I eat. Over the past few years I have found it increasingly more difficult to maintain a healthy weight. Between working at a desk for 8-10 hrs a day and having twins a year ago, my activity level has significantly decreased. In order to keep myself at a healthier weight I had to drastically change my eating habits. Now my diet resembles what they call Paleo or Primal. Lean meats, veggies, healthy fats, nuts & fruit. No grains, no rice, no processed foods.

    Without the heavier/complex carbs, artificial sugars, and processed foods I find that I am much healthier, have more energy and can easily maintain my weight.

    . . . so what about my food preps?! So much for a majority of my long-term shelf life options (aside
    from dehydrated or freeze dried). So I am stuck with canning my own or buying canned foods (we also
    a dehydrator on order)?

    Then it hit me . . . the whole reason I had to change my diet was because of decreased activity level. In most SHTF scenarios you can expect a moderate to extreme increase in your physical activity level if you have a sedentary (a.k.a sit-on-your-ass) lifestyle. So wouldn’t it be smart to stock up on some of the heavier carbs like wheat berries and rice?

    It does go against the “stock what you currently eat” philosophy, but if you can store it for 20+ years why not? We do on occasion have bread and rice, so it’s not like it would go entirely unused.

    What are everyone else’s thoughts on it?

    CT

    #37269
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    In my view stocking up the types of food that keep well, provide the calories and other nutrients required for healthy living without being bulky are what is needed. If I or anyone else can get fat during a shtf more power to you. I have the normal rice, beans, canned meats & fruits. Some pasta canned sauses & miscellanious other stuff. Some people want to eat healthy diets which is great, my main concern is having enough food. Hopefully gardening and animal husbandry work out.

    #37270
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    CT, Yes your right in a SHTF time you will be doing a lot of work so can foods maybe ok, also your diet may change since you will want to hold on to how much you are eating since you will not know how long the SHTF. Can on caning but buy can foods that you know for a fact that you will eat.

    #37272
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I have focused on food that can be stored for a long time, while having some variety. CharlieTango is right that most of us will have increased physical activity requiring more calories than we curently consume.

    #37277
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    CharlieTango, good observations! We enjoy canning meats (wild game too), fruits, bone broth (elk bones, chicken feet my favorite!), and vegetables. That’s one example of longer term storage. For some folks canning skills is a big plus. It’s also the way we’ve been able to eat much more healthy too. You can think of all of this food as ‘medicine’ of sorts. I’m a testimony to what great nutrition can do to help address health goals you’re working on. Our food supply for SHTF does not differ much from our weekly menu. I must say it’s easier to live in rich farmland that serves local market. We know our farmers by name and we trade together too. We also have benefited from a naturopathic doctor to help focus efforts and offer suggestions. Food for thought….

    #37280
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    chester, that is great that you can do the canning your self. Here in the city I am limited to buying can foods. Wish I was able to buy good can meats(wild game like deer would be a dream).

    #37281
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Canning can be pretty small scale. I know folks into canning and live in the city. Urban preppers

    #37283
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    for all of you who can

    http://www.reusablecanninglids.com/

    they work well

    #37286
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    chester were do you buy your supplies for canning.

    #37301
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    namelus, I bought a bunch of the Tattler lids last year but haven’t used any yet.

    freedom, I have bought regular lids in bulk from Lehman’s. If you don’t get their non-electric catalog you should. Lots of good stuff. I have a sister in Ohio and have told her if I come visit I want to go to Lehman’s. For me it would be a Prepper’s Disneyworld.

    https://www.lehmans.com/p-2831-bulk-canning-dome-lids.aspx

    When it comes to canning, now is the time to buy jars and lids. Lots and lots of them. If you only have a couple dozen, how far will that go in feeding you all winter? Sometimes you can find someone looking to get rid of theirs because they gave up gardening. I got about 300 that way a couple years ago when a neighbor was cleaning out the dad’s house after he passed. It took me a whole weekend to clean them but it was worth it. When I give away stuff I’ve canned, I tell people to return the jars when they’re done. If they don’t I don’t give them anything any more.

    #37302
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB, thank you Sir for the link. I will study it and order there catalog.

    #37305
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    freedom, we built up our canning supplies. An investment on the front end to benefit in the long run. We typically watch for sales on canning jars e.g. few years ago Walmart had crazy sale on canning jars. NOTE the instructions for canning meats compared to say canning tomatoes. Funny factoid about canning ….during Napoleonic Wars France was trying to discover a way to preserve food to feed troops and ‘science’ of canning took off.

    USDA Complete Guide
    to Home Canning and Preserving

    http://extension.usu.edu/utah/htm/fcs/food-preservation-canning/usda_home_canning

    #37309
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I find the best prices for canning jars are at the end of the season (late autumn after everyone’s gardens are done) when they’re trying to get rid of the remaining inventory.

    Edited to add that I just go with the widemouth jars these days even though they usually cost a bit more. I find them a bit more versatile.

    #37310
    Profile photo of CharlieTango
    CharlieTango
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Thanks for the feedback. I definitely make sure that whatever I buy is stuff that I use. Especially canned or short term shelf-life stuff (1-5 yrs shelf-life type stuff). However, like 74 and MB stated, I think it would be smart to keep some long term shelf life stuff stocked up as well. Such as the rice, wheat berries, beans as well as freeze dried & dehydrated foods. We do eat all of that now and then, but it isn’t part of our daily diet now. But having it for post SHTF when our bodies will really need the calories will be a good thing.

    Canning my own food is one of my next steps along with expanding how much of my own vegetables I grow instead of buy. My family kept a garden and my mom canned when I was a kid and it is something I have been working towards for a few years now.

    This past year I got into bow hunting (deer) and got my oldest into it as well, so looking forward to being able to can some venison as well.

    #37313
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    chester, Great link thank you, I will make copies of this.

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