Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #13272
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Attended my fourth kage aruki, – shadow steps class today.  I have been practicing, practicing and had thought I finally might have made a very teeny improvement. HA! Delusional me.  When you witness someone who has mastered this in various terrains etc ..I m still in awe….but determined.

    Anyone else practice or mastered stealthwalking? l

     

     

     

    #13273
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I didn’t know that there was stealthwalking. I want to know more about it.

    #13278
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Never heard of it . Sounds interesting .

    #13279
    Profile photo of WhiteKnight
    WhiteKnight
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    It does sound interesting. More importantly, useful!

    #13281
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Freedom it is one of the first things taught in Ninja training  -shadow steps – part of learning stealth walking or I think if I can spell it right krage ninjitsu. Now I don’t have the time or body at my age to study ninja ways fully, but I want to learn the art of stealth walking in particular around my place and stealth in general. God knows I know the ‘tactical advantages’ of being taken by surprise. I met the elderly father of a friend who has study Ninga way under a master for many years. He is bored living in country with daughter and agreed to have class here at my place as have different surfaces, terrain etc and is private.

    Class, except for me and 2 others – 8 are hunters! Today he placed one of us in the barn (animals turned out) and closed it and the task was to see how close you could get to that person one at a time (different people/chnaged in barn person) Knowing the sounds of my own barn was an advantage…I could tell by a change in air current that someone had entered the barn..which was the only reason I  was not freaked/surprised when he tapped me on back of shoulder. I did not hear him over the gravel, wood or concrete.

    Another lesson working on is how to follow behind someone over diff terrain n surfaces without being detected by matching our footfall with theirs so any mistakes made the person followed thinks was them n takes no notice. Classes are 2 weeks apart and he/instructor said he will know if we have been seeious and practicing and if not he reserved right to ask a student to leave  no waste energy on them. Tmrw will try n post some more info on dumb tablet now. I also practice walking ard here in dark when I remember so I always can s3nse or know where I am if needed in future. Definitely makes u more aware of yr surroundings.

    #13288
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Keep us posted, I find it very interesting. You are lucky that he lives close.

    #13345
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Well I am at a normal laptop so can answer better Freedom. Being the age I am with joint injuries I am only interested in learning the art of stealth to the best of my abilities/time. Mostly stealth walking. Ninjitsu I believe did not start out as a ‘martial art’ but rather as a military training. Now I guess there are all sorts of forms of Ninjitsu with various names practiced as martial arts. This elderly man (you would never know how old he really is) I met through a friend (her father) when we decided to get our fathers together (mine recently moved in with us). He is old school and does not think of the newly developed schools well from what I can tell. I got a long better with him then my father. We got to talking (he is from Japan and speaks pretty good English) about the world and why I lived in the countryside and well one thing led to another and he agreed to show me/teach a few how to do stealth walking and learn to be more stealthy with all the other things you usually move on to like stealth crawling, but not using silent weaponry etc.

    I will ask him if I might make a video of next class maybe for you.

    First watch this short video from a master in Japan. Pay attention around the 1:00 mark when he briefly describes the power food of ancient ninjas and how it was made. I thought that was fascinating.

    I looked a bit on the web and here is the best one I found showing what I am talking about. Same dude has like 20 some other videos I noticed on other things that would be useful to know when SHTF.

    A very short one by another is: http://www.howcast.com/videos/505960-How-to-Walk-Silently-Ninjutsu-Lessons. That is how he began us with walking, although he gets more detailed with every class, covering different surfaces, terrains etc with each one. But this is basic idea for you.

    I think if you watch a few and start practicing yourself you will see it is not as easy as you would think! And, you can end of breathing hard as it can take more effort than you think to move slowly in a controlled manner.

    BTW I noticed in the side bar a video (actually two in the series) on Tactical Hand Signals which we all have been working on learning for silent communication. Reminded me. Maybe I’ll put it in a separate post with links to those for people.

    HTH – try stealth walking – much harder than you think.

    #13375
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    tweva, Thank you for all the links and will be looking forward to your video.

    #13379
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I can think of lots of uses for this. Thanks.

    #13484
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    This is really interesting tweva. Please write more when you train different things.

    I studied some stealth techniques from ninjutsu in my teenage years. The one that stuck with me is to crouch down with crossed legs and tucking in your head so you break apart the human silhouette. This has worked for me before.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #13497
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Footwear plays a big part in this. Soft flexible and flat soles are the best. Mocasins the indians wore are great for this. I saw a set one time made from deer hide with the fur on the outside. Even the soles still had hair. I don’t think the hair would last long on the soles but they were incredibly quite. The fur acted like a muffler for any debris under foot.

    #13588
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Makes sense Matt. Mocasins like that sound as if they would be amazingly quiet. I know some people who are into urban exploration and really use the ninja shoes called tabis.

    I never liked them for their lack of grip and profile though.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #13650
    Profile photo of gollor
    gollor
    Bushcrafter
    member1

    Those tabi boot things with crappy rubber soles are sold as novelties. Those are not how tabi were used back then, nor now really.

    Japan has a pretty warm climate, the average winter low is like 40 degrees F. Traditional tabi were used like socks. Something to keep your feet warm when you were wearing the geta sandals that were so common. Geta were easy to make, just need some material you can weave like reeds and some time and poof – shoes. These are some they sell in Japan, which as you can see, look like socks. They are worn now with traditional clothing for a festival or a traditional wedding ceremony.

    There is some traction advantage with the split toes, you can get a better grip on the grown with your toes if the sole is decent. Construction workers still sometimes wear jika-tabi a special kind of outdoor tabi like these. It’s hard to find any decent ones over here, but I’ve heard of steel toe work tabi.

    I like my Vibram FiveFingers, much better if I want a grip on the ground with toes and don’t want to tear up my feet with rocks.

     

    Tabi aren’t unique to Japan, and they’ve been around for a while.

    BTW, tweva, extremely envious of the training you’re getting in stealth walking :-)
    I’d love to learn that from someone who knows what they are about, but no one teaches it around here.

    gollor
    ---------- Life needs an edit button - with find and replace.

    #13653
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Gollor- I feel so fortunate to have met this fine, older gentleman serendipitously. Not having been in the military I have always wanted to learn something like this to be able to move about my property if needed and check out what is going on.

    #13676
    Profile photo of Jayman
    Jayman
    Survivalist
    member2

    Hi all –

    Late to the conversation, and this is not true ‘stealth walking’  but one thing that I did learn when studying sword arts and related topics from a fine old gentleman decades ago. He said that one of the things that true ninja learned, in blending in with crowds ( what we now call ‘being the gray man’ ) – was learning to control our walking pace. He showed us that most of us have a normal / natural walking pace, but that if we wished to be unobserved we must be able to walk or shuffle slowly if the people around us are elderly or just slow moving, sightseeing, etc. With a younger group, or people moving toward the bus or subway or trains, we should arrange our pace to flow with them.  According to our master, the ninja did not go about wearing black outfits, masks and hoods when they were scouting a mission or in some cases, even if they were about to assassinate a target; rather, they would remain hidden in a crowd, dressing and behaving like everyone else – no outstanding characteristics, no furtive movement. Natural and calm, he said that if the ninja had to strike in daylight, he would perform his task, then without hurry or panic, simply disappear into the masses or the surroundings.

    Just a thought I wanted to share.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.