Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #4411
    Profile photo of skidmark
    skidmark
    Survivalist
    member2

    Let me offer you two little words: Surviving Katrina.

    That’s not the only, or even the best, “discussion” on what happens when you decide that you agree cwith the Government that it is time to leave. Along the eastern and gulf coasts there are waves of evacuation – those that leave when the warnings are issued, and those that leave when the mandatory evacuation orders are issued. Most of the time both groups get stuck in massive traffic jams along major interstates/highways. One car breaking down can tie up traffic for miles and miles.

    If your plan is to bug out, you need to know the signs that tell you it is time to go before everybody else jams the roadways. And it helps to have several routes planned out that avoid the major choke points.

    Do you know what signs to look for? How often do you check to see if those signs are building up? Where do you go for your information?

    #4451
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Skidmark –

    ‘Do you know what signs to look for? How often do you check to see if those signs are building up? Where do you go for your information? – ‘

    Of course you on dead on. And, I think it will a good read/thought-provoking for many, to hear your answers to that.

    Thanks for bringing it up

    #4484
    Profile photo of Kiwi25
    Kiwi25
    Survivalist
    member3

    http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs/klessons/

    This should link to the blog “Listening to Katrina.” One of the best “preparing” type blogs I have read. Not applicable to every scenario… but full of good stuff. (and that’s not just my opinion..I have seen it referred to often).

    Here in NZ where we have earthquakes.. you perhaps get NO warning.. and no chance to bug out. You just have to be prepared to survive. In my location it is likely all the roads would be blocked by rockfalls/ landslides. We could not get to nearby towns , hospitals etc.

    #4692
    Profile photo of barrowwight
    barrowwight
    Survivalist
    member1

    Wow… Thanks for that link Kiwi. Reading that right now… solid gold, that one.

    #4709
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Thanks too KIwi for link…hadnt seen b4….checking out now

    #4991
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    skidmark,
    I’m preparing for a major hurricane since I live in Charleston, SC in an area that’s 5 minutes from the beach and extremely close to the marshland.
    You brought up some very good points about evacuating.
    Also, thank you kiwi25 for that link! Great info.
    Hannah

    #5014
    Profile photo of skidmark
    skidmark
    Survivalist
    member2

    Years ago my inlaws (retirees) waited till the mandatory evacuation order to leave Hilton Head Island and headed with the rest of the herd to the designated safe place of Columbia SC, which took them 5 hours to reach with less than 1/8 tank of gas left. The hurricane took the NOAA most-likely path right to Columbia and ripped apart the roof of the motel they were staying in. Had they been paying attention and knew how to read the NOAA data they would have seen that in the 36 hours before the evacuation order the chances of the storm (or a serious storm surge) hitting HHI went from 95% to <12%, and that with the projected path decidedly WNW heading N would have been the better bet. As it turned out, Florence SC was essentially untouched (OK, some rain but no high winds or flooding).
    I’m well aware of the cost and disruption packing up and getting gone for a few days, as opposed to one day, can involve. But I suggest folks balance those costs against the lives and mental health of their family.

    #5022
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    skidmark,
    I completely agree with you. Our lives are infinitely more important than anything else.
    Learning about the weather and how to read NOAA data is an extremely valuable skill to have. I am an amateur at this but am very grateful for the skill I do have at it.
    The home I live in survived Hurricane Hugo (our “Big One”) so I’m confident that it would be okay in up to a Category 3 hurricane. However, I’m not going to bet my life on that and will get out immediately if necessary.
    Hannah

    #5163
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I plan to stay put as long as possible . the less moving around , the better for me .

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