Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 31 total)
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  • #27140
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Everything that I have read about all viruses they die in a dead body, all viruses not just Ebola. The longest test that I know of is 7 days. The host needs to be alive for the virus to stay alive. In the buildings it is no longer then 72 hours. If a body freeze shortly after death that I have not read any articles on that but I can say that viruses can live if they are frozen so yes that maybe a problem up north.

    Dogs and cats do not get Ebola but the Ebola virus may stay alive on there fur, Whirlibird is right on that.

    If anyone finds that this info is wrong please let me know where I can read this. I have read a lot on this so maybe there is some new info that I have not read.

    #27144
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    One of the reasons Ebola stays alive in Africa is that Ebola lives in Monkeys and many eat the Monkeys. The bodies have never been the big problem there. People keep infecting each other and the Ebola virus does stay alive for about 48 hours on anything. I thing that if there is many dead bodies everywhere that the bodies will not be infectious after a week and that also applies to the houses and buildings. The Ebola virus will just die.

    #27148
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I don’t think ebola will die in a body because it Is dead. Doesn’t it stay alive in a petri dish indefinitely at the right temperatures?

    #27161
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>74 wrote:</div>I don’t think ebola will die in a body because it Is dead. Doesn’t it stay alive in a petri dish indefinitely at the right temperatures?

    And there is the answer.
    The body cools, becoming an unhealthy place for the virus.
    Much like it can’t survive on its own on hard surfaces more than a few days, the same occurs in the body.

    #27175
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirtly, sorry bud but that’s wrong. It can stay alive for weeks.
    This stuff is easy to research so lets not make things up.

    SURVIVAL OUTSIDE HOST: Filoviruses have been reported capable to survive for weeks in blood and can also survive on contaminated surfaces, particularly at low temperatures (4°C) Footnote

    http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/lab-bio/res/psds-ftss/ebola-eng.php

    #27184
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    74, yes in very cool temp it may stay alive. The body will die and the virus dies too. The virus needs a live host so no more then a week at best. More then that it would have to be very cool, yes (4°C) may stay alive. But the minute that it gets hotter it is over.

    If the blood is alive then yes it may stay alive for a long time but if the blood is dead then no.

    The point is if the SHTF and there are dead bodies everywhere for months then those bodies will not have live viruses, only if the person dead less then a week then you have a problem.

    Here is a good article on viruses in dead bodies, also in this article there is “The body’s defense system” which I have posted many times about how important it is for us to have a strong immune system.

    http://www.humanillnesses.com/original/U-Z/Viral-Infections.html

    #27186
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Freedom, That quote says blood outside the body. Weeks. Longer in cool temps. So blood on the ground will stay alive weeks. Inside a dead body, maybe longer I think.

    #27202
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Remember that viruses to stay alive need a live host.

    “Viruses lack certain features that other forms of life have. They cannot convert carbohydrates, proteins, or fats into energy, a process called metabolism. They cannot reproduce on their own, but must enter a living cell and use the host cell’s energy.”

    Read more: http://www.humanillnesses.com/original/U-Z/Viral-Infections.html#ixzz3GMPoEQNV

    #27203
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    74, this is a great small article that talks about a dead body with HIV virus which will live no more then 16 days in 2 degrees Celsius. That is the longest time for a virus. Read here, http://www.thebody.com/Forums/AIDS/SafeSex/Q8660.html

    #27206
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Freedom my friend, that’s HIV not ebola. It doesn’t really matter. I’m not grabing any bodies by hand.

    #27496
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    I am thinking that for body disposal the safest bet would be to wait until the dry out or finish decomposition. This would take time, but unless you really have to move them to get them out of the way it would probably be the safest way.

    Even then I would want to wear the highest level of protection I could get my hands on.

    In colder climates it may be better to wait until they freeze then bury or burn them.

    #27497
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    In the northern areas even digging with a backhoe is difficult after prolonged cold.

    #27499
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Not just northern areas.

    In eastern CO where we used to live, they’d dig a handful of graves according to statistics plus one every fall just in case. The body would be moved to the family plot after the thaw.

    #27500
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Pheonix, The cold climate may keep the virus alive much longer. You are right that when the bodies decompose it will be safe to move them. I also would always wear gloves, and a mask. But everywhere I read the virus needs a live host to live but who knows anymore.

    #27509
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    I imagine that if it is a catastrophe of the magnitude that means I am having to organize body disposal then I will be digging very large holes to put the bodies in well in advance of filling them with something along the lines of a bulldozer or large front end loader.

    I may just dig a very large pit or trench and push trees and other flammable debris into it then dump bodies scooped with a front end loader into it and burn them and repeat as necessary until the pit is full.

    My goal would be to first clean up the remains out in the open where they are easily accessible first and then deal with the ones inside buildings after they have frozen or finished decomposing. This may mean burning or demolition of some buildings. Either way the remains end up in the ground whether they are burned or not.

    After a mass grave is filled I would place some sort of markers around it or over it to let people in the future know just what kind of ick they may be digging up should they feel the need. perhaps a count of how many people and where they were found could be made and placed on a marker stone.

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