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  • #27059
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    It looks like to survive you may have to self quarantine in your home for a few months until enough people die for the virus to run its course. Let’s say you are ready for this and successfully manage to ride out the storm, so to speak, and there are now literally dozens or hundreds of dead bodies from people that died from the Ebola virus lying in the street, in homes and in other places you may have to go into to survive once you break quarantine.

    How do you protect yourself? Eventually they are going to have to be disposed of and if it turns out to be a true SHTF EOTWAWKI scenario there will be no government to “fix it.” This means that survivors, including you and your group will have to do this.

    1. How long does a dead body remain contagious?
    2. Obviously you do not want to touch them. Do you pile combustibles on them and burn them where they lie?
    3. How burned is burned enough to be able to safely handle the remains?
    4. You also need to take into consideration other icky things you can catch from handling decomposing bodies.
    5. Do you just pick them up with a front end loader and pile them into a pit for disposal?
    6. Can the corpses be chemically cleansed instead of burning them? I.e. how much bleach do you pour onto them?
    7. Will animals, especially dogs and cats, be able to transmit the disease? If so, for how long?

    Please feel free to add your own questions or thoughts to mine. It looks like this could start to become a real issue by the end of the year. I am scheduled to be back home from North Dakota to Florida in December with my truck. I intend to stock up on trip supplies and what I may need once I get back while I am there. If it really does become an issue I will either encounter empty roads or blocked roads. Either way it should be an interesting trip if this is not contained.

    Anyone in Central Florida that wants to be able to hook up if this becomes bad please PM me. We may have to hide individually to survive the epidemic, but once it is over we may need numbers to continue surviving.

    #27062
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Pheonix, I do know from reading a lot on the Ebola virus that dogs and cats do not get Ebola. Monkeys do.

    On the time that the Ebola stays alive everywhere I have read it is 24 to 48 hours but they maybe wrong. Almost all viruses do not stay alive very long in a dead body. Burning them maybe a good idea after that since dead bodies may have other diseases. Always wear gloves and a good mask to burn them. In Dallas it looks like no one has been infected at the apartments where the Ebola patient lived, they did still burned everything but I believe it is infectious for the 24 to 48 hours.

    1. How long does a dead body remain contagious? 24 to 48 hours.
    2. Obviously you do not want to touch them. Do you pile combustibles on them and burn them where they lie? I think that after the 48 hours you can feel safe to just use gloves and a mask and drag them to a location to burn them.
    3. How burned is burned enough to be able to safely handle the remains? Like I said before after the 48 hours the Ebola virus is dead, all viruses need a live host to live.
    4. You also need to take into consideration other icky things you can catch from handling decomposing bodies. Yes many other diseases may start so you need to use gloves and a good mask.
    5. Do you just pick them up with a front end loader and pile them into a pit for disposal? I think that if this happens we will be able to drag them to a point to burn them. They will be dead for longer then 48 hours.
    6. Can the corpses be chemically cleansed instead of burning them? I.e. how much bleach do you pour onto them? I don’t think we need to do that. Just burn the bodies.
    7. Will animals, especially dogs and cats, be able to transmit the disease? If so, for how long? No dogs and cats do not get Ebola virus. Only Monkeys do.

    All of this may change but this is the info that is out there. Ebola virus may mutate. But one thing is for sure in dead bodies all viruses die after a 48 to 72 hour range. They all need a live host to live.

    #27083
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I’m thinking a BOBCAT and piece of equipment capable of digging is going to be necessary.

    #27094
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Ah so you survived the plague. Your problems are just beginning. I’d recommend the old British tv series Survivors for a start.
    A frozen dead body will be just as contagious as a freshly dead one when it thaws out. In Breaking Bad they put the bodies in barrels labeled toxic waste and poured acid on them. In the Black Death they just dumped the bodies into mass graves and shoveled lime on them. Not to close to their wells I hope. I wouldn’t ever let a dog or cat lick my face or hands or clean up the waste from one. Step in doggy human poo immerse your boots in bleach or at least 70% Al. Time to get out the chem warfare manual I guess. No handshakes and eye mask not glasses.

    #27118
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good questions. I will admit I hadn’t gotten my thinking to the aftermath yet. My quick answer is that I don’t think we really know when or what would be infectious. As Brulen noted, bodies that freeze shortly after death may well be infectious when they thaw. Once bodies are in the open, 74’s answer says it succinctly, but they need to be gotten into the open assuming most will have died in their homes. Dousing a body with bleach would help but that’s not going to kill the virus inside the bodies so it seems some kind of biohazard suit is really going to be necessary for those emptying houses of dead bodies.

    As an aside, the genealogy nut in me says to record who the people are that are being buried this way, and if names are not known, record at least the address and some particulars….young male, older female etc. so that family that comes looking for them later can have some finality as to what happened.

    #27122
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Backhoes , bulldozers , and bags of lime .

    #27123
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    This all sounds great so far. My concern about pets is because I heard they killed and incinerated the dog belonging to the nurse there that contracted Ebola in Spain and took the pet (dog, cat, ??) of the second nurse in Dallas and quarantined it somewhere.

    This leads me to believe these animals could have somehow transmitted the disease, maybe.

    A little paranoia may be a good thing in this scenario.

    #27126
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    The quarantine on the critters is to ensure that nothing is living on the fur.

    Here’s a thought.
    The mass graves from WWII and other conflicts since.
    Accidental or intentional, the end result is the same, dozens, hundreds or maybe thousands of unidentified bodies.
    With that, how does one make sure no one goes digging later? For their own safety.

    It’s an ugly situation regardless.

    #27131
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    http://www.thelibertybeacon.com/2014/10/09/cdc-hermetically-sealed-caskets-for-ebola-victims-aka-fema-coffins/

    After speaking to a black friend from Zimbabwe, I thought I should start looking into what he said. He said that there is no girls missing – remember the 200 … it appears their parents are also ” missing”
    Then I found this article.. http://www.thelibertybeacon.com/2014/10/14/from-ghana-ebola-is-not-real-and-the-only-people-who-have-gotten-sick-are-those-who-got-shots-from-the-red-cross/

    Oh well. It is interesting to read.

    #27133
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Leopard,
    As crazy as that last article is, reality here in the US is worse. The level of incompetence and stupidity on display is astounding.

    Dr. Tom Frieden, director for the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said during a telephone press briefing Wednesday that you cannot get Ebola by sitting next to someone on a bus, but that infected or exposed persons should not ride public transportation because they could transmit the disease to someone else.

    …I think there are two different parts of that equation,” he continued. “The first is, if you’re a member of the traveling public and are healthy, should you be worried that you might have gotten it by sitting next to someone? And the answer is no.”

    “Second, if you are sick and you may have Ebola, should you get on a bus? And the answer to that is also no. You might become ill, you might have a problem that exposes someone around you,” he said.

    #27134
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Mtbiker,
    The safest, fastest, and easiest method to deal with bodies in buildings is to burn the building down. It will disinfect the whole building and dispose of the bodies without exposing yourself to contamination.

    Any building would otherwise need disinfection.

    #27135
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    74, depending upon where the building is, burning it could be an option. In rural areas, this could work for standalone structures but in more densely packed areas where structures are close together, it wouldn’t work so well. Those structures might just need to be sealed up and abandoned for whatever the necessary time is given how difficult disinfection would be in the aftermath. The problem with that though is rodents or other critters getting inside such structures.

    #27136
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    There are no doubt many problems with burning, but it safely eliminates potential reserves of the virus. Pray the fire walls work.

    #27137
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Local survivors will have to decide how they want to manage their risks. Fire will be one of the primary options as would the BOBCAT and burial trench. I for one am not interested in dragging infected bodies out of structures but where proper bio containment garb and training is available it is feasible.

    #27138
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    You know I’m not making an argument as there will be buildings that need to be saved for multiple reasons. However entry will require as noted a hazmat suit just to make an assessment. Then lots of disinfectant.

    Just a note about tyvec suits: They tear relatively easy if they catch on anything. Additionally it’s important to have plenty of room in your suit. The crotch of the suit will rip out with little pressure. Move slowly and be aware of snags and tripping hazards. Quick forceful motion can tear the suit.

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