Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #3887
    Profile photo of Danie Theron
    Danie Theron
    Survivalist
    member3

    This is a post from another forum. It was posted by “leafinthewind”. I think he makes some good points.

    His post:
    You’re 200 pounds of solid muscle. You can still hump an eighty pound pack up the side of a mountain without breaking a sweat. You think nothing of pushing yourself to the limit each day, every day. But what about your wife who’s thirty pounds overweight? What about your kids who won’t walk a dozen steps without screaming to be carried? What about your seventy-five year old father in law with the bad knee?

    What I’m getting at, I suppose, is the longtime adage that confirms a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. As the saying goes, I’m not as young as I used to be. Nobody is. I exercise regularly. I generally eat right. I practice a myriad of skills to the best of my ability, finance, and time that may one day save, or prolong, my life. Maybe somebody else’s life.

    My place of work is eleven miles from my house. I could, and have twice, walked home from work caring my thirty-two pound get home bag. If my wife would have been with me on either occasion, the five hour journey would have stretched to a minimum of double that, probably much longer. It’s not that she’s out of shape (much) but rather because she has ongoing mobility issues due to a car accident years ago. I suspect many of you are in the same boat.

    My mother in law lives with us. Eighty-five years old and wheelchair bound. She isn’t going anywhere. Heaven forbid something happens that requires us to leave the house. If vehicular travel were not possible for whatever reason, we would be hard pressed to even remotely consider traveling. Again, I suspect many of you are in a similar situation.

    I have been blessed with a job, a house, enough land to survive on for years, the health and ability to continually hone necessary skills, a loving family who understands, encourages, and participates in their own way to ensure that we can ride out many potential storms. But the fact of the matter is, there is no such thing as a “bug out bag” in my reality. It’s all me, and it’s all about getting home.

    Reexamine your own personal survival situation. So often I hear “I need more guns,” … “I need more food, water, ammunition,” … whatever you want to fill in the blank with. Can you even carry what you have now if you had to? Do you really know where you’d go and how you’d get there? What about the important people in your life, … do you realize that their limitations are actually your limitations?

    So I ask you to give it some thought. You are forging a chain with your own blood, money, time and integrity. But you’re not the only one adding links to that chain. Understand that it will never be a perfect grade eight logging chain. Identify the weakest links. Some you can reinforce. Others you can’t, no matter how hard you try.

    What, and where, or your weak links?

    #3902
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Very good points, Danie, thanks for posting this thought-provoking thread. I would love to see a general guideline for something like “preparedness fitness at every decade,” to where I’d know as a 40-something woman what I should be shooting for.

    Obviously, one of the best assets for crisis survival will be good general health and physical fitness, so being at the top and keeping yourself at the top is utmost, but — more practically speaking — what is the baseline, and how do you maintain it while still having a life outside of prepping? (Some people can spend all day working out, but for those of us who can’t… :) ) If someone knows of something like this that’s already out there, please link – I’d love to see something on it!

    #3940
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    I agree with Anika I would love the link if you find something on it as well.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #4012
    Profile photo of Danie Theron
    Danie Theron
    Survivalist
    member3

    Anika and Jypsy, this is a big question you ask. Someone could have a book written on the topic. However, I think that things get overcomplicated and I have tried to distill information down to key ideas and concepts that you can come up with reasonable ways to apply to “your” personal situation.

    I am pressed for time these days and will have to break this down into parts. This is part 1. Please stay tuned for coming parts.

    Part 1:
    Essential Fitness Areas
    For the type of event we discuss here (civil war, collapse, natural disaster, etc.) I will distill fitness down into 3 essential ability areas you need to possess:
    1. The ability to walk for long distances while carrying moderate weight.
    2. The ability to lift and move heavy items.
    3. Flexibility and mobility.
    Now, this does not mean that these 3 areas are the only useful fitness areas. If fitness is your hobby and you want to get into something much more complicated and refined – no problem. What I am saying is these 3 skills are essential. They are universal for all ages from the child to the elderly. What these mean to you as an individual will vary based on current abilities, physical limitations, etc. We will discuss adapting your “personal” training program towards accomplishing these 3 objectives in future posts.
    However, start here first and no matter what type of program you eventually do – you NEED to work on being able to do these 3 things.

    #4025
    outdoorfury
    outdoorfury
    Survivalist
    member1

    Agreed. I am glad that the people that have started to post here see the world in a sensible way. Good to get the BS out immediately and understand that we are all people bound by limitations.

    Figuring out how to deal with a situation with those limitations is where the rubber meets the road!

    We also have to consider the fact that not everyone will make it if something truly disastrous occurs in one of our areas. People that need oxygen or a constant flow of medication to survival will not make it when the supplies run out.Try and do what you can to stock up for a week of hard to come bys and several months of medication.

    I know that if the SHTF i would have my own family challenges. This makes you think!

    #4070
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Thank you – this is very helpful!

    #4146
    Profile photo of Kollaps
    Kollaps
    Survivalist
    member3

    Thanks Danie,

    I would also include climbing (over walls/fences) and strong leg muscles for crouching and self-defense (moving your body effectively–not kicking!). That means leg and upper body strength.

    #4274
    Occam
    Occam
    Survivalist
    member2

    Health/fitness, is one of my most important preps.

    To be free from medication, ailments, and the physical ability to get things done, whatever it may be. Whether carrying some type of weight for long distance, not being utterly exhausted after completing a demanding task, etc.

    Circuit/crossfit type workouts, steady state cardio, with weekly heavy weight days, is what works for me.

    #5000
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    Danie,
    This is great insight that a lot of us don’t consider.
    I have consistently prepped for my family.
    But what if our families will hold us back? This is not something I am willing to give in to.
    I have a sister that, anytime prepping is mentioned, states she would rather “die than live” in a SHTF scenario.
    First, I don’t believe it and have continued prepping for her on the basis that she will thank me later. And second, if that really turns out to be true then there’s nothing I can do/have done and I will have to accept it (mental preparedness’s importance can never be stressed enough.)
    My mother is a doctor and has extremely valuable skills for a SHTF scenario and up until recently was of the same mindset of my sister. She realized that God called us to never give up, even in a nuclear zombie apocalypse filled with bands of armed looters (kidding about the zombies,) and has become almost glad that I am prepping for our family.
    I believe that my family will thank me later!
    Hannah

    #5182
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Bottom line , unless your Superman , no matter how good shape your in or how muscled up you are …you can be killed , and frighteningly fast . a stray or purposeful bullet , or a knife thrust into your gut when you are not expecting it , because you took the wrong person lightly or underestimated a person , thinking them easy mark . Think about how many ****** punches land …then think about it being a knife instead of a fist . Yes be in shape , but your mind and judgement will serve you better and keep you alive longer . Remember also that there are pistols designed for this purpose , very small and easily hid ….that can be good or bad .

    #5484
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Some great points raised in this thread. Just want to add in, that brains need to complement and possibly even beat brawn, so for those with fitness issues or physical limitations don’t despair too much, there are still a myriad things to work on. You have to ‘train with the body you are in’ get as fit as you can but know your limitations and plan in accord with them.

    A slight aside, but relevant story following on Tolik’s point. My best friend, at 27 years if age, having qualified as a Royal Marine, who was boxing for the marines team and had just begun the selection process for UK Special forces got stabbed to death in an altercation by a guy notably smaller and weaker than him. 3 hits (one to the neck, two to the heart) with a small (under 4″ blade) was all it took… As I say, we need to use our heads as much as our muscles…

    #5485
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Sorry to hear about your friend , but thank you for posting it , that may just save somebody’s life in the future .
    Old West Proverb : ” God created man , Smith & Wesson made them equal ”

    I have had both a gun and a knife pulled on me before ………..I gotta tell ya , the knife was a hell of a lot scarier , there is something about a knife that hits you on a primal level , no gun will ever be able to .

    #5490
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    This is a very good theme that Danie has raised. I’ve found that most prepping talk seems to be that people have pictured their ideal preparedness vision and are working towards it. But Danie asks what to do about people we care for who are elderly, or disabled in some way, or are over weight and very unfit, or they are children and can’t cope with the adult demands. Then there are people who are blind, or have an amputation, or are bedridden, or need dialysis twice a week. The list can go on.

    Prepping seems to assume being able-bodied, but what shall we do if we don’t live that life? Shall we be ruthless, employ survival of the fittest and let the rest die? Shall we put ourselves at risk to protect the weaker members of our group, and possibly die because of it? These are not trite questions, but are very difficult and painful ones. I think they can reveal what sort of character a person has.

    Sometimes there is no easy pop TV culture answer where some convenient twist in the story or some techno-babble saves the day, and no magic reset button that means that next week everything will be back to normal. Personally I think that building character now is what will define us when hard times come.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #5642
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    Elijah,
    You are absolutely right. Spot on as usual! Building our character now is as important as building our survival skills.
    Hannah

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