Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 138 total)
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  • #13549
    Profile photo of WhiteKnight
    WhiteKnight
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    So I’ve gotten myself a Ruger Mini-14 in 5.56mm (also accepts .223) because I had heard of the reliability. I got the stainless steel/synthetic version to ensure that it lasts.

    However, I now hear that it tends to lose accuracy quickly when it heats up a bit. That scares me. I guess the older ones were terrible offenders for this, I have one of the newer ones which have a thicker barrel throughout maybe 2/3 of the barrel length.

    Does anybody else own one of these newer ones or know a lot about them? I intend to get some range time in soon, but as of now I’ve only gotten maybe 60rds through it just to make sure it works.

    Any info or opinions would be helpful!

    #13550
    Profile photo of WhiteKnight
    WhiteKnight
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Also, keep in mind I live in Nazi York. They’ve banned just about everything good here. AR-15’s, AK’s, anything with a pistol grip, anything with front grip, magazines must have max capacity of 10 rds.

    #13552
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    You might consider something like this: REMINGTON 7615P PUMP-ACTION RIFLE .308 Win. and the 7615P in .223

    http://www.americanrifleman.org/article.php?id=14987&sub=9

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=414886080

    #13556
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    WhiteKnight,
    Here is another option that they are unlikely to mess with. Slower fire than the pump but very reliable and accuracy should be good.

    Mossberg MVP VAR .223: http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=415764851

    Ruger in 308: http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=414703318

    #13559
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Breathial,

    Before you dump the ’06 let me suggest something. I don’t know what kind of stock is on the rifle so the price may vary a little but consider installing a mercury recoil reducer in the butt of the gun. A mercury recoil reducer is a pill shaped tube filled with mercury but has an air gap in it. When recoil travels through the stock the sloshing motion of the mercury absorbs some of the recoil. They are about 85 dollars and a gun smith won’t charge much to install it. My wife had a little 243 that kicked like a mule for what it was and I had the reducer installed. Made a huge difference. 30-06 is a hard hitting round that is readily available. This might be an inexpensive fix for a good gun.

    #13564
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    WhiteKnight, the Mini is a good choice.

    Ignore much of what you read about it online,  many of the problems were and are blown out of proportion.

    The accuracy can diminish from barrel heat, but the same happens in the AR platform with the thin barrels, just don’t do repeated mag dumps and you won’t have too much of an issue there.

    The gas block is often tightened to different tensions, taking the screws out and lapping it into place can do wonders after the screws are reinstalled with equal tension.

    Stick with factory mags, the aftermarket ones have pretty much been junk.

    Practical accuracy, the Mini normally is more accurate than the shooter. Especially if the shooter isn’t trying because its just a Mini.

     

    #13645
    Profile photo of WhiteKnight
    WhiteKnight
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Thanks Whirlibird!

    I honestly don’t know how to get to the gas block but I had read somewhere that fiddling with it makes a huge improvement on the mini. I’ll look into it further and if its too complicated for me, I just landed a new job so I will pay someone more competent to look at it for me.

    Appreciate the response!

    #15313
    Profile photo of kiitycat119
    kiitycat119
    Survivalist
    member1

    That depends on where you bug out to. For me personally, my bug out plan is into the wilderness feeding off of hydroponics systems. For the area I’m going to, I am stocking up on blow darts, and arrows/heads more than bullets and gun. There is simple reasoning behind this. Each bullet you can only use once. Blow darts and arrows you can use many times each. In my terrain has A LOT of trees so I can make arrows. Besides this the terrain, my specialty is wilderness survival and I can disappear quickly into the woods, a silent weapon is better.
    I say guns are more for getting to the bug out location and for use if you are in the city/town and plan to bug in. The problem with guns is that each bullet can only be used once and then its gone forever. I am going to get guns and ammunition as a quick defense on my way to the bug out location.

    #15328
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>WhiteKnight wrote:</div>
    Thanks Whirlibird! I honestly don’t know how to get to the gas block but I had read somewhere that fiddling with it makes a huge improvement on the mini. I’ll look into it further and if its too complicated for me, I just landed a new job so I will pay someone more competent to look at it for me. Appreciate the response!

    http://rugerforum.net/ruger-semi-auto/32890-new-mini-14-torque-settings.html

    http://www.perfectunion.com/vb/ruger-mini-14-mini-30/84578-torque-gas-block.html

    http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f95/torque-gas-block-screws-29967/

    #15329
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Kittycat,

    I think you reasoning is sound, as long as you are currently practiced and successful at taking game. I would want a good weapon as a defensive measure just in case.

    #15332
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>kiitycat119 wrote:</div>
    The problem with guns is that each bullet can only be used once and then its gone forever. I am going to get guns and ammunition as a quick defense on my way to the bug out location.

    Actually I’ve remolded a number of bullets over and over, if they can be located, the bullet (cast lead) can be re molded over and over.

    I have also reloaded cartridges in the field, while in camp at night. With a minimum of gear, some pre-set measures, dies and such, one can restuff the cases fired that day, over and over.

    One summer, I reloaded my fired cases every night, not replacing the cases or digging into my stockpile and some .45 cases were loaded more than 20 times and were/are still functional. Although finding them sometimes can be a chore.

     

    #15347
    Profile photo of Kiwi25
    Kiwi25
    Survivalist
    member3

    The skill required to take game with “primitive” weapons is WAY beyond most of us.  The natives can do it because of a lifetime of practise.. and make it look easy.   Any fool can hit a target with a rifle and scope.. ask me how I know….   I highly recommend a .22 with a scope.. to get you thru the years before you HAVE to hunt the old ways.  Traps  ( steel ones) are good too.

    ANY rifle is a huge step up over virtually any primitive weapon.  Even in the hands of someone not expert.  And most of us are not expert.. and most of our enemies will not be either.

    #15394
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Guys and gals..

    I was thinking about this thread. While the weapon does matter, it’s the man more than the weapons.

    I shall illustrate my point with a historical anecdote:

    Late in WWII while the allies were pushing across Europe, the Germans threw their best guys against them, but trusted “the rear” to be held down by a bunch of old guys with obsolete weapons. These “old guys” were Forestmeisters, professional hunters, etc, and were not fit for front-line service, but they could still bear arms.

    The Brits, thinking they would pull a fast one on the Germans, dropped paratroopers – the elite Green Devils – in the German “rear”… literally right on top of these “old guys”. Even though the British paras were much younger, much more fit and better armed and equipped than the old guys, those “old guys” shot the British paras to pieces with careful, aimed rifle fire. They handed the Brits their asses that day.

    It’s the man more than the weapon. (No offense to any females… my wife is a fair hand with a rifle. I taught her… keeps me honest. :) ).

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #15406
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Don’t mess with old guys, they’ll just kill you.

    Malgus, I would agree.
    The firearm is a tool, the man is the weapon.
    Some are a little rusty, but they can still cause havoc.

    Some firearms are more appropriately suited to a SHTF situation than others. And for various reasons.
    Hence the discussion.

    #15408
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Some firearms are more appropriately suited to a SHTF situation than others. And for various reasons.
    Hence the discussion. – Whirl..

    Firearms are a toolbox. You choose the correct tool for the job. Hunting requires one type of firearm. Street fighting requires another. No one weapon can do it all. But, I’m preaching to the choir..

    That said, I think the “best” firearm for SHTF is the one you can hit with and are most comfortable with… like the old saying goes “Fear the man with only one gun”….

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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