Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)
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  • #26196
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Part of the reason I conceal carry these days is protection beyond two legged predators. I’d imagine these incidents like below will be even more common during SHTF. Detroit has its own SHTF going on. Something to consider for city dwellers and others too in prepping for SHTF.

    “Man loses hands, feet in dog attack in Detroit”

    http://www.lansingstatejournal.com/story/news/local/michigan/2014/10/03/dog-attack-critically-injures-man-detroit-police-say/16638879/

    #26197
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    chester, This will be a problem in a large SHTF time. No one will have food for there dogs and just let them go. They will become wild and will attack everything that moves.

    #26199
    Profile photo of WhiteKnight
    WhiteKnight
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Handgun or shotgun is what I’m leaning towards in dealing with such a threat. I wouldn’t say no to a good combat knife either. Dogs are tough, having wrestled them often working as a kennel worker for my first job.

    The bad news is that they are very fast and won’t leave you much time to react, plus their jaws (depending on breed) can break bones and ruin your tissues in a hurry. They also can’t be rendered unconscious very easily. It would take a professional boxer or a ball bat.

    The good news is that unless the dog is exceptionally powerful, an average size full grown man can overpower them in many cases. We are not the prey they were built for, and this leaves us a fighting chance. With a weapon, a person has a pretty solid chance even if they’ve already locked onto you. Without one? Fight as viciously as you possibly can. Rip his ears off. Poke at his eyes. If you have the presence of mind, reach for his legs and trip him down, and then get on top and attack ruthlessly. Also, dogs are difficult to choke, depending on breed, but it is possible. Don’t count that out, especially if you happen to have cord or string in hand.

    If there is more than one… well, that’s serious trouble.

    #26200
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    WhiteKnight, it’s the dog pack scenario that needs even more consideration. In Alaska this summer outside Fairbanks I saw a dog pack on the move that got me thinking. Started keeping a 30 round Glock magazine a bit more handy for the camping trip and the shotgun.

    #26202
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    This is prepper 101 but also make sure your vaccinations are up to date. Rabies is a real threat and people (even tourists) to Thailand for example get bitten all the time. Yes there is something you can do right after you got bitten to prevent rabies but these treatments won’t be available in an all out disaster or collapse.

    I often go running in rural areas with rather vicious dogs. I have a small pepper spray with me because of that.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #26204
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    You can make your own spray (only in a shtf scenario) using ammonia in a spray bottle or squirt gun. It would work on any thing but remember it will cause injury.

    #26215
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    chester is right on the dogs, they will turn wild and will become dog packs so in a SHTF there will be five to ten dogs together. This will be trouble in the nights, also they can smell food miles away even if you are not cooking it.

    #26217
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    The Native Americans sometimes ate dogs…Koreans and others still do. Just a thought.

    #26219
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    I know that wild/feral dogs are a serious threat. There was a vicious pack roaming in the woods when my Dad bought our NJ farm in 1947. The State Troopers finally shot them all. One looked me over when I was about 4–I thought it was a deer at first (fawn colored). After I got the “chills” from its stare and threw my toy at it, it left. I wasn’t dinner that day.

    #26225
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    You should have heard the wolves where I was this summer.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #26234
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Big number of “wild” dogs are problem here even today, so very often they attack kid, or older man, causing some serious wounds.
    If SHTF today, it would be HUGE problem, simply because 20 years ago or more during my SHTF time there were no such big number of those dogs on the streets.
    When they are hungry they can do lot of damage, and when SHTF they will be hungry.

    #26236
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Couple of years ago, we had problems with a pit bull breeder.
    They were breeding fighting dogs in town. After a number of close calls, the breeders were convinced to move out of town.

    Within days, there were reports of dog packs running loose and animal kills. There were an average of 5 dogs running loose, killing cattle even.

    Our county deputies were seeing them but weren’t able to get gunsights on them having to stop the car, get gun out, etc.

    The dogs eventually chose the wrong target, when stalking some calves at a cattle yard, they circled a cowboy.
    He went 5 of 5 with a bolt action .270.

    Shooting dogs is a very controversial thing, emotions running high.
    Having shot more than I’d care to consider, I have found certain preferences. Lightly constructed, highly frangible bullets out of a .400 bore or larger are my personal choice in a handgun. The moat visibly effective I used were the Cor-Bon 10mm 135gr load and the Mag-Safe .44 Special @86gr load. The .45 was effective but just not as much of a lightning bolt as those mentioned.

    Rifles, after what I would consider a failure using the .223, I switched to the .308 again using lightly constructed bullets. It was decidedly more effective.

    Shotguns, for most of us, slugs are just too dangerous to use. Too many people around to let an ounce of lead loose in solid form.
    After having a load of 00 buck exit in one case, hitting a brick house, I started carrying a couple of lead “BB” loads just for this.

    Most of what I had to do was up close at slobber distances. The animal had to be stopped right now. Wanting and needing as much power as could be effectively used was a major issue.

    Looking at this from another angle, as I am arming my kids, I am having to make concessions because of hand size and comtrol. Its a tough balance, power and capacity for kids and a wife with small hands.

    Right now, I’m seriously considering LW Commanders chambered for the .40 caliber. While not the capacity I’d prefer, especially for dogs, the size, weight and power as well as adaptability of the guns themselves make up for that.

    #26237
    Profile photo of Amanda11
    Amanda11
    Survivalist
    member3

    Chester, this is a very valid concern. My Grandfather is buried in one of the older cemeteries that we visit in a very bad area of Detroit. While one starving dog can be a problem, they tend to run in packs of at least three (the largest I’ve seen was over ten). Pit bulls are the most prevalent breed, but there are literally all kinds. You see them often, and we have rules that are critical to staying safe:

    1) Driving our vehicle right to the site, and remaining very aware of the surroundings. The car is never more than thirty feet away.

    2) ALWAYS being armed. That is non-negotiable: my Grandmother is not allowed to visit the site without a CPL-carrying family member. The dogs are quiet, and can easily outrun an adult.

    That being said, it’s pretty awful seeing them. Some packs are vicious, but sometimes big dirty mutts run up wagging and begging for food while I’m sitting in the car. I can’t say no to a dog, but have to be extremely cautious as well: their temperaments can change in a second. We’ll drive out of the cemetery onto a side street (the dogs usually follow) and toss them any food we have in the car. If its a single dog that I feel confident about, I have a friend who owns a “Bully Breed” rehabilitation that I call. If she has room, the dog gets a ride to her facility. So far I haven’t been bitten, and I’ll readily admit that has been a combination of being a fairly good judge of dog behavior and pure luck.

    It absolutely sucks that we live in a society where this happens. My opinion is that all Detroiters should be required to have a permit to own an animal, and part of the process of getting that permit is to make sure the animal is spayed or neutered, and micro chipped. If someone moves and leaves an animal (or throws it out in the cold), they should be brought up on animal abuse charges. We currently have two in our house that are “Left Behinds”: cats that were left out in the winter after their owners moved, and we found them freezing and starving to death. Eventually we’ll add a couple of dogs to this duo of happy freeloaders, and they will be Detroit Dogs for sure.

    #26309
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks for the thoughtful feedback. As with other potential SHTF issues… being aware of the issue and having a plan will go a long way. I wonder if taking out the ‘alpha’ dog in the pack first will make a difference.

    #26342
    Profile photo of Firefly88
    Firefly88
    Survivalist
    member1

    Dog are dangerous if, trained to be so or if, left to run wild the wolf is still in the blood of these beast. The havoc they can cause is legendary. Cry ‘Havoc,’ and let slip the dogs of war;That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
    With carrion men, groaning for burial. Is a famous quote about such destruction. So either wild or on some sick bastards command you may have to deal with a dog or pack of dogs. Whatever you do do it quick and do it vicious so as to put the others off.
    I have been bitten before and I can tell you that keeping calm and measuring your response is important. I managed to keep my fear in check and escape with minor injury.

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