Viewing 13 posts - 61 through 73 (of 73 total)
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  • #33803
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Breathial,
    There’s a lot that can be done with a decent frame and skin on an RV.
    I’ve gutted and rebuilt two Airstreams in the last 20 years, wish they had been mine.
    Using expanding foams in the walls and floor, rerouting the hot water lines and venting, adding window covers (seals), and more the second one done could be heated in 30f temperatures with the hot water heater and fridge alone. Below that one needed to turn the heater on, high wind days would effect it but it remained livable.

    Labor intensive? Probably a couple hundred hours research and planning. Then there’s the actual work, but that can be compared to buying a similar unit if it existed.

    The first unit ended up in Texas, post hurricane. Replacing a lost home, its still there.
    The second is used as a seasonal home by an author friend in the mountains of Colorado. Its literally stored inside a building made of straw bales, and the only reason the owner doesn’t stay there year round is it takes a snowmobile to get there for 4.5 months of the year.

    #33805
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Breathal,
    You should look at some marine applications. There are woodstoves made for boats. For example:

    http://www.suremarineservice.com/00-NEW-SF.aspx?gclid=CL_PkNnrgcMCFWgF7AodXiUAsQ

    #33807
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Heat transfer would seem to be the only anwer for RV heating. Circulating hot water thru insulated pipes. Where you get the hot water is the question. I had an a pickup truck camper outfitted for cold weather and used a Force 10 propane heater for boats. i tried a diesel drip heater of the same type but it blasted us with to much heat in a small space. The Force 10 was a wall mount and we used it for years with good results. In fact I still have it even though the camper is history. These days we want something bigger like an airstream. I did see very big AS around 40 foot with a wood stove once. It was being refurbished. Just hook it up to an outdoor wood boiler and you have all the heat you will ever need.

    #33833
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    This is to elaborate on my comment yesterday about folks that are going to have a rude awakening when the reality of the details hits them. None of us will cover every detail but most plans seem to have rather glaring holes in them. Just hitting a single topic here, many plans assume gardens will supply food post-SHTF but how many of those folks have seeds set aside for those gardens? Canning supplies or other means of food preservation? A couple dozen jars isn’t going to do it. Replacement lids? Vinegar or the means to make it? If the garden doesn’t already exist, do they have any idea how labor intensive it will be to get the soil turned over the first time and the plot readied for planting? My new garden is 75’X170′ (12,750 sq. ft or about .3 acres). It was a day’s work for a guy with an industrial sized rototiller. Doing it by hand would have been a monumental undertaking. Then a wet spring made clear that a couple parts of it were too wet and a trench along the wood line was needed to divert water away from the garden. Another day’s work for a guy with a small backhoe. I wouldn’t have wanted to have to do that by hand post-SHTF, but prior to the garden plot going in I didn’t realize the water diversion would be needed. Fencing or other deer/other critter defense? And so forth. Details do matter.

    #33836
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    MountainBiker, that’s the beauty of forest gardens… You will have some food after the plunders come in and clean out your garden and kill and eat all your livestock… and occupy your house. Be prepared. Expect the plunders to come after the main house, garden and livestock. Have a hidden fallback position and caches in a number of stealthy locations combined with stealthy food production.

    http://edibleforestgardens.com/

    Happy 2015! It looks like a rosy year. :)

    #33841
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    c, I’ve read of forest gardens but my woods are too thick, too stony, and too wet. No sun reaches the ground at all. Too many pines, hemlocks, and these arborvitae type trees. I’m not sure what I could plant that wouldn’t need any sunlight. I would like to put some caches out there though as a safety mechanism. On my to do list.

    #33851
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Mushrooms

    #33858
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Also try to make the RV as airtight as possible. Just tiny gaps and airflow male you lose plenty of heat.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #33862
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    I have similar questions about a mobile home, it is very close in answers.

    I found an “insulation paint” that is “space age” stuff, I’ll have to find the link, but it would be great for your RV, Breathial…

    Plug all air leaks, big plus.

    I once had a small >500 sq. foot house, and wrapped the eaves to the ground with Plastic. You could get a couple of the huge tarps and cover the RV while stationary, it could really make a big difference! I was able to reduce my stats by a lot with the plastic wrapper around the house. All that was open was the front door, the back was still OK for emergencies, but covered.

    Just a couple ideas ;)

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #33864
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    http://www.hytechsales.com/spcoatings.html

    For the insulating paint.

    Selected by NASA link:

    http://www.hytechsales.com/Popup/spinoff2.html

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #33988
    Breathial
    Breathial
    Survivalist
    member3

    The earlier point about seeds and food, IMHO, is critically important. Given the surprisingly small amount of room to store food and water (beyond the on-board water tank), food availability will become a major concern very quickly, especially if you have little ones. In short, it would seem my compromise/BOV/RV/SHTF-vehicle is NOT the panacea to solve all problems.

    As another had pointed out, the only way this becomes a viable emergency vehicle is as a measure of shelter and (some) physical security, such as it is. Without a cache to go to for food, water and fuel, the solution is strictly short-term, no matter how much planning you’ve done and how much work/modifications you perform on the RV.

    Which means we (as in my family and myself) need tribe. Like-minded friends, whatever family will have the strength to prepare (even to some small modicum of energy), some friends who are retired military operators (unlike our local SWAT operator “wannabes”), and so on. The reality is that no matter how much we prepare, we can’t be walking a perimeter 24x7x365 with an M-60 slung over our shoulder (like Rambo). We all have to sleep sometime, and have someone to watch our asses while we’re trying to catch some Z’s…

    Already working on this aspect, renewing old friendships, seeing what’ll happen. Try as I might, all the efforts I make aren’t going to make the slightest difference, if we don’t have a tribe to link up with, however we do it.

    I’d written this aspect off as impossible, due to the apathy of most of the people I meet. But compared to the technical problems which are simply insurmountable (without being independently wealth, which I most definitely am NOT)….? I guess it’s time to be quit being a hermit, and try to be sociable again. :-|

    #34068
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Breathial, few can go it alone for sure. I don’t know how large of a tribe you have in mind but if it is more than one other family, you will quickly find yourself needing to discuss a BOL that is workable to all. If you are able to identify a BOL in advance of recruiting people it may make the recruitment all the easier.

    I knew none of my friends or relatives (other than my son) were of the prepping mindset and so never went down the recruitment road. I instead picked a BOL in what I considered a good setting and where I had neighbors that I guessed would have practical skills. Also a place reasonably convenient for my son to get to (100 miles of mostly rural territory).

    #34101
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Breathial, I think you are going on the right direction. Your points in your last post are all good points. Remember to start now since all you posted takes time.

Viewing 13 posts - 61 through 73 (of 73 total)

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