Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 73 total)
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  • #33322
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Breathial,
    No it’s not unrealistic, success is determined by the skills, equipment and individuals involved. Circumstances and conditions dictate the environment. I can build a shelter if need be, make use of an unoccupied building or sleep under the stars. Primitive societies lived in cold climates, jungles and deserts thousands of years without any modern inventions. Certainly it can be done now if required. Where your family is young, mine is all adults. Everyone has their own set of parameters to work out the best they can. What happens if you are forced to leave the RV?

    #33323
    Breathial
    Breathial
    Survivalist
    member3

    What happens if you are forced to leave the RV?

    Then we’ll be in the same boat as everyone else.

    #33505
    Profile photo of ronym
    ronym
    Survivalist
    member5

    what happens if we are forced to leave the RV ?
    the same question also apply to our house, car, even our last bug out location
    ( i think selco ever discuss about it )
    so keep in mind that we dont have to “sacrifice” our family life just for our “physical possession”
    .
    first thing that came into mind is Bug Out Bag
    think it as the last “retreat”,
    if any circumtances we have to leave 80-90% what we have
    our priority are choose / pick which thing we can carry
    to ensure our family life
    even if we are forced to flee in foot
    ( like if any man forcing us with bigger gun to leaving our RV or car or even bug out location )
    .
    so what in it ?
    the firrst thing are … Gold and silver
    ( think like Jew refugee that run from NAZI )
    okay-okay we cannot eat gold… so we will not eat it
    ( same as we will not eat our knife, ammo
    even eating spoon are not possible…
    so keep in mind that we will not eat gold and silver in any way…
    and using them in proper usage )
    when “the dust are settle” we can barter it for land or tool or whatever we need including food
    yup… mobile and portable “asset” that we can carry by hand
    .
    second… or course food and water at least for 3 days
    ( that’s why we dont have to eat gold and silver )
    third… survival kit ( LED flashlight, spare battery, portable solar charger, multitool, portable knife, water filter, tarp, poncho, small plastic rope, needle, fishing snare, and many more little thing that ensure our survival chance…
    but are not weighing our BOB too much )
    .
    fourth… small barter item
    i think selco ever mentioned it… cheapo gas lighter…
    we can carry as much as 20 to 30 gas lighter without weighing BOB
    for making fire… and if we need to “barter” it with food
    ( rural people will accept it in exchange with their “excess” food )
    .
    of couse we will not using BOB in extended time ( more than 3 days )
    more over if we have family ( wife and kids )
    so the proper “strategy” are to ensure our family survival
    ( still live and safe in searching new “home” or “shelter” or BOL or just heading for the hill, cave or any save place that we can think of )
    and we still have “any means” if we are forced to start all over again from zero when we back to the society
    ( gold and silver proof it for thousand of year )
    .
    fifth… all prepper or survivalist know it well
    weapon or any defence tool ( whether it is just a simple stick
    or laser pointer… DIY bow and arrow or else )
    .
    The Last Thing but not least
    We pray to God for His guidance and protection

    #33510
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Very interesting thread, Breathial. All this brings to mind that, as preppers, we must be mentally and experientally prepared for primitive situations. My husband and I are not young any more (65/72 in 2 weeks) and pray that we will not have to ‘bug out’. But we have had many years experience living in tents/trailers/one-room cabins (Alaska) and sometimes villages in India. Lack of privacy and lack of amenities are realities that many cultures consider the norm. Our realities–if things go down, as they have for you Breathial–will be far less than we have become accustomed to, as ‘rich’ Americans (top 10% of the world in living standards.) We know large families in Alaska that have lived in one-room tents all winter (think Army tent with a small wood stove), and large families in India who live in 100 sq ft thatch huts all their lives. No bathroom, no water taps, no privacy. And are able to smile every day, grateful for life. You personally have been homeless for long periods and can adapt; your wife and children are having a much harder time. This brings to mind that all of us should spend some extended time living in primitive situations so the transition will not be so shocking. At least a few weeks camping etc. Just some thoughts… Hope all goes well for you esp as you look for employment and continue to upgrade your accommodations.

    #33524
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    In my 5 years living in Japan I learned to “dance.” The house where I lived was mostly Japanese but with a Western flair. Propane tanks for cooking and heat. The whole place ran on 30 amps. “Dancing” was using more than two electrical items at the same time. Microwave had to be used by itself. If the air conditioner was running you might use something electrical but most times it would pop the breaker.
    Robin

    #33534
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    Robin wrote:
    In my 5 years living in Japan I learned to “dance.” The house where I lived was mostly Japanese but with a Western flair. Propane tanks for cooking and heat. The whole place ran on 30 amps. “Dancing” was using more than two electrical items at the same time. Microwave had to be used by itself. If the air conditioner was running you might use something electrical but most times it would pop the breaker.
    Robin

    We call that “power management” but it clearly is a Dance! I have hopes of working up a home system for myself that uses Solar-charged battery banks, and automated power management. One really cool example would be to have the AC go to fan only when other bigger loads kick on. MOST if not ALL of our household AC appliances are designed to use a lot of power,
    #1 It’s cheaper to produce an inefficient appliance
    #2 The utilities make a larger profit

    Switching to certain RV appliances and newer type stuff is going to make these off-grid homes and BOL’s a feasible venture.

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #33535
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    You might like this article: “Our dishwasher broke just after Christmas. The timer stopped working, and a new one costs about $100. My wife suggested that since the dishwasher is nineteen years old, we should buy a new one. Up until now it was working very quietly and efficiently, washing and drying a full load in about an hour.

    We visited the appliance shop where we had recently purchased a new clothes washing machine a few months earlier. I mentioned to the salesman that our new washer was very slow, taking nearly two hours to finish a large load compared to our old one, which took about 35 minutes. With a bright smile, he explained that that was because of the new federal energy efficiency standards for clothes washers enacted by the Obama administration’s Department of Energy in May 2012.”

    http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2015/01/america_is_being_transformed_into_embrazilem.html#ixzz3Ns97bpyF

    #33541
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks 74. This explains a lot. Last year we replaced an ancient dishwasher and the new one is definitely slower than the old one. The year before we replaced the washer & dryer and they are also definitely slower. It is good to know we aren’t just imagining this, I think.

    #33561
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Everything that the Obama administration does is slower!

    #33753
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>freedom wrote:</div>Everything that the Obama administration does is slower!

    Except the damage, it just keeps getting faster.

    #33773
    Breathial
    Breathial
    Survivalist
    member3

    A couple of aspects that seem trivial but merit consideration are trash disposal and laundry.

    Trash disposal becomes important in that, when you’re in a tight shelter with your food stores and water bottles neatly organized, the organization tends to degrade when you’re consuming your food and water; the containers are now trash that you must compress, toss in a garbage can or reuse, depending on your plan. Any way you look at it, you’ll need to have space to store the remains until you’re ready to take it away. It becomes even more important if you’re in a hostile situation; less evidence of your presence increases security.

    I realized this could become a real issue in a SHTF event, because food and liquids in stores today are packaged in such a way that huge volumes of trash are generated on a regular basis; I’m dumping plastic trash, bottles and wrappers 2-3 times a day! While it’s now as simple as walking 30 yards to a dumpster, if it weren’t so convenient, it would get smelly and mess fast. NOT good. Clearly this is something I’ll have to consider for the future.

    Next issue is laundry. Modern RVs often have a laundry unit which washes and dries small loads of clothing in a compact 120V unit. The problems with them are their small capacity, extended time to complete a full cleaning cycle and the large amount of water consumed. While they can be useful, these drawbacks must be carefully considered in a SHTF situation. In our case, the unit was faulty and we chose to remove it rather than repair it, freeing up desperately needed storage for coats, and blankets. In an emergency we have two weeks of clean clothing without concern about becoming “fragrant,” and longer if needs be.

    #33775
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Yep Whirlibird, I had to take my father to the SS offices today and there was a big 2 to 3 hour line and in front of me there was a man in his 40’s that was talking his head off about the line and how bad it was and this is why Capitalism is what it is! I just looked at him and my father held my hand and told me just do not waste your time with this guy.

    If my 85 year old father was not there with me I would have let him have it. First I would have told him what the hell do you think we have for the last 6 years? Not Capitalism! All Socialism. Also what do you think SS is? It is a Social program, and ObamaCare another Social program! What Capitalism are you talking about?

    Well my dad keep me quiet. Sorry about going off on the topic it just got my blood going in the morning. Also what is he doing in the SS office when he is in his 40’s and can work?

    #33777
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    You are doing a great job adding layers of details for us Breathial. In the end the details do matter. Most plans out there are very general, and I’m guessing the details will prove to be a rude awakening for many.

    #33784
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>MountainBiker wrote:</div>You are doing a great job adding layers of details for us Breathial. In the end the details do matter. Most plans out there are very general, and I’m guessing the details will prove to be a rude awakening for many.

    The devil IS in the details.

    #33801
    Breathial
    Breathial
    Survivalist
    member3

    Whirlibird: The devil IS in the details.

    Precisely. There are a lot of little things that we simply take for granted, which (in SHTF scenarios) will simply cease to exist.

    Spend some time living in a third world, and you’ll gain a MUCH greater appreciation for simple things like hot water on demand (or just running water in a house), washing machines, clean dishes and glasses, and that internal feeling of safety and security. Take away the internet access, cell phones, TVs with 100+ channels and even your favorite music on the radio… in other words, live like it’s the 1800’s and you’ll quickly find out how things REALLY are.

    I worry for my kids, because they’ve known all this crap all their lives: IPads, internet, DVDs and television, all the other stuff that is designed to keep you entertained and preclude intelligent thought. When that entertainment is stripped away, they’ll have a tough time adapting to a life where their whims are NOT instantly satisfied… It won’t be easy for them, that’s for sure.

    Another aspect of living in the RV in the colder months, is the heating.

    Even newer RVs typically use single-pane windows, which means in the cold weather, the windows tend to build up condensation on the inside, and let the heat out at the same time. As well, RVs typically are NOT well insulated, so in either very hot or cold weather, temperature control to keep your rig livable can be problematic. Now, I don’t consider “livable” to be 72 degrees inside during the high-heat of summer or the dead of winter. I’m saying keep it at <80 during the worst of summer, and >65 during the winter, when temperatures get down into the 30s or 40s. Even THAT is a challenge.

    I mentioned the insulation of RVs, even new ones, is terrible. Air is a terrible heat-transfer medium. To improve its effectiveness, we typically use fans to blow air over heat-transfer surfaces (such as the radiator in your car); to further degrade its effectiveness to transfer heat, we trap the air, and keep it from moving at all. That’s what insulation does. So insulation effectiveness increases with the thickness of air trapped in place, which is why R-30 insulation is significantly thicker than R-20 insulation that you’d find at the local Home Depot. More trapped air, less heat transfer. This all matters on RVs, because the walls of RVs are typically 2×2 studs, with 2″ of insulation in between the inner and outer skins. The outer later is typically either aluminum (excellent heat transfer medium) or fiberglass (good transfer medium), a tiny amount of usually fiberglass insulation, and then a 1/4″ sheet of wood. In other words, it’s not a good means of sealing out the heat or cold. You CAN replace the fiberglass with foam sheeting, which will help, but that requires gutting and re-walling the interior of your rig.

    Short of that measure, you’re limited to using your internal (propane) heating system, which will quickly consume your on-board store of propane, or you have to find another means of heating your rig. In our case we decided to use two ceramic heaters, narrow models that stand 2 feet tall and draw 1500 watts at maximum load. With 400 amp-hours (assuming 80% depletion) at 12.5V, that means we could run one heater for 3 hours 20 minutes before the batteries are done. And one cold nights, that one heater will be running all night, pretty much nonstop, to keep the RV >65F. Such a solution is easily possible when using external “shore” power, but without it…? Hmmm. Clearly something needs to be done, but I’ve not yet determined a feasible solution for a SHTF situation. Short-term the obvious answer is more blankets, right? But that takes more storage space, which is already in short supply, another compromise solution which clearly isn’t the best. Better would be to insulate the RV better, but that would be seriously labor intensive and not guarantee sufficient results.

    Still working on it…

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 73 total)

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