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  • #44706
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    This is from my site:

    Every once in a while I run across something that strikes me as a no brainer, but needs to be said. The H fire is one of those things.

    In this video a SERE instructor goes over the H fire and how to use it. He uses a green stick to set up his canteen cup, but it can also be used for heat. The video doesn’t cover it, but if you take a few rocks and place them around your small fire they can be heated and used as everything from bed heaters to hand warmers. Back in the day, my old Boy Scout leader used to have us heat rocks with small fires to help keep us warm while we were sitting around during classes. We also used the H fire idea to hide our Sterno fires and white fuel stoves when I was in the military.

    The base concept of the H fire really has multiple uses and you should keep this design in mind as a way to either hide or protect your fire as the situation dictates.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    • This topic was modified 1 year, 11 months ago by Profile photo of sledjockey sledjockey.
    #44714
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Didnt know about that one , I subscribed to his channel , lot of fun things on it .
    Here is another guy , he is a Dane living abroad . He isnt as active but comes up with some good things now and again .

    #44745
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    Sled, thanks for that H fire video. It answers the question of how to ditch a fire quickly, and hide the traces.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #44753
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good video. Very smart way of building a low maintenance fire that can go for a very long time.

    #44754
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I like the technique a lot. Having a tarp or poncho to put the dirt on is a key factor. I use a tarp for dirt when ever I’m digging in landscaped areas to control the appearance of the ground. You can put a lot of dirt on one and not leave a trace of your activity.

    Using a tarp would allow you to dig a Dakota Fire Hole and not leave evidence.
    http://survivaltopics.com/the-dakota-fire-hole/ A much more involved fire, but useful to hide a fire.

    #44756
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    This helped me remember that, packed away in a backpack, I still have my Survival School (now SERE School) manual. I need to pull that out and do some review after all these years decades. I’ve allowed myself to forget too much. When it’s time to bail out, that’s not the time to refer to the checklist for the procedures – I either know what I need to do right then, or I don’t (to my peril). Preparation is not just having supplies, but knowing how to use them by DOING it, and practicing it so the skills are maintained at a readiness level.

    Thank you!

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #44757
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    The Dakota fire hole that 74 posted looks interesting but it probably would be very difficult to build here. Too many stones and if anywhere near woods, too many roots. There is a reason farmers abandoned most farms here back in the 1800’s when lands in the MidWest opened up to settlement.

    #44760
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    You’re correct about digging the Dakota Pit. Like all things local conditions dictate what and how you do things. Even the H Fire has local conditional limitations. If the soil is loose, loamy or sandy and dry it won’t fold back without disintegrating. That’s why the tarp is so great to have. Pull back all the surface covering away from the site. Dig a shallow hole for the fire, placing all the dirt on the tarp. When leaving dump the dirt in the fire pit and recover the hole with the original leaf covering.

    I just want to say none of these methods will hide your other activity moving around the camp and collecting burn materials. That requires a lot of practice and concentration while you’re in the act. Don’t cut anything, and don’t break any green branches or plants. If you can collect your fire starting materials while walking in you will disturb less around your stopping spot.

    #44766
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Here is another guy , a Canadian bushcrafter , he has some good things on his channel , he boiled water in a birch bark container , yes it worked . He didnt think it would either .

    https://www.youtube.com/user/kullcraven

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