Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 34 total)
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  • #17182
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks all for the ideas. I’ll add sand bags to my list.

    #17775
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    Using larger quarry gravel is better than sand does not leak out as easy when bags are torn.

    #17777
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Gravel is one pain in the a## to shovel. I wouldn’t want to fill bags all day doing that. Hard materials also create more ricochets and flying fragments.

    #17781
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    74, let him do the gravel so he doesn’t need to go to the gym! LOL! Just joking. But you are right that it will create ricochets. Now if that is the only thing you have then use it. The same goes with black dirt, it will not have the same stopping power but if it is the only thing that you have then use it.

    #17799
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    I’m sitting here trying to come up with water and sand bags. Since water can not be compressed it is the best medium to block incoming. A demo I saw had a fish tank, large bale of hay, cinder blocks and thick wood. Everything failed at keeping a 7.62×39 from penetrating through to a balloon except the fish tank.
    Robin

    #17801
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Robin,
    How well did the tank do on the second shot?

    #17804
    Profile photo of benjammin
    benjammin
    Survivalist
    member3

    I prefer Hescos to sandbags, but they are not as man-portable. Defencell is a suitable alternative, but also not man-portable. If you use sandbags for projectile defense, always stack them two deep. One is not enough to stop 30 cal consistently.

    #17820
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    74, that’s why I would like to come up with something that is both water and sand. Guess you could call it “Redneck Ballistic Gel.”
    Robin

    #17829
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Robin,
    Mud bags. Actually I think they will only work for one round as well. The energy absorbed by the water will be transmitted outwards explosively popping anything you try to contain it in.

    #17836
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Speaking of mud bags I was thinking along that line but with different type of mud. Stuff used to put down marble or granite tiles is also called mud but really is cement without the rocks. Only thing wrong with that is the stuff sets up (hardens) after a few hours.
    Robin

    #17840
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “Mud. Stuff used to put down marble or granite tiles is also called mud but really is cement” Robin

    Ya well every cement mix is called mud by the purveyors slinging it, cause it has that consistency. Problem with thinset is cost, it’s expensive.

    My personal belief about this is why reinvent the wheel. Use the most simple method possible so it goes together easily and can be repaired easily under pressure. Need more protection use more bags. Just don’t cave the floor or roof in with the weight.

    #26283
    Profile photo of stingray
    stingray
    Survivalist
    member2

    Possibly the Ultimate sand bag! http://www.homedepot.com/p/WM-Bagster-Dumpster-in-a-Bag-775-658/202228840
    2.5’x4’x8′ for $29. Need a serious barrier (semi portable)? Would require about 3 yards to fill it, and weigh ~6-9 Klbs depending on the fill, but would probably stop an AP 50 BMR!

    #28360
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Tin Hat Ranch in the video proves through multiple shots that it is the fluid quality of the sand that repeatedly self-heals each hole and friction-grabs the bullet and strips off its jacket.

    Wetting it with water and/or cement defeats this important quality. With the resulting cement you have a brick wall that will crack and split apart with just a few directed shots.

    On the other hand, if you kept your paper-wrapped cement bags dry like ready-made sandbags and when SHTF slipped them inside the plastic sandbags or tough-contractor trash bags(much cheaper) to protect them from getting wet you would have some unnoticeable, discrete, affordable, ready-to-go/standby protection. (Why do I still have a pallet of cement bags, friend? Well, huh, I’m still planning to build that slab for my future toolshed/barbeque grill). I do believe pure sand is better but like small caliber guns v. bigger ones, dry cement bags are better than a wet pile of sand a block or more away.

    Downside is the agregate/rocks in the ready-mix: if a bullet hits them they might ricochet out the bag into you and/or your face. Tin Hat Ranch needs to get off his butt and test this! :-)

    #28377
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    A related question here. I live in a log home. Ignoring the windows of course, how well would the logs stop the various standard caliber bullets from penetrating?

    #28380
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MtB,
    Logs and trees don’t stop rifle rounds. The better penetrating pistol rounds will probably go through a 8″ log as well. A 30-06 can penetrate 32″ of oak.

    Scroll down to the pictures.

    http://preparednessadvice.com/self-defense/ammo-penetration-can-problem-home-defense/#.VFoRMPnF_Xo

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