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  • #31777
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    We didn’t have power for about 9 hours today due to about a foot of heavy wet snow bringing down trees onto power lines. Probably my fault for thinking “at least we didn’t lose power” when I had to go out early this morning with a chainsaw to cut away some large limbs that came down on the dog run. No sooner did I think that but the power went out. We maintain a land line given limited to no cell service in our house. A couple of the phones in the house are land line phones which should still work when the power goes out (vs cordless phones that don’t), but they didn’t. I went down to the basement and pulled out an old rotary phone that we saved for just this purpose and it too didn’t work. We’ve used it in that capacity before. Anyone know if technology has changed in a way that makes these options no longer viable? I suppose it wouldn’t surprise me because it seems most technology advances seem to make us less resilient rather than more.

    #31780
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I have a ” candle stick ” phone , made in 1915 , it doesnt even have a rotary dial , but I can get incoming calls on it , and both parties can hear each other perfectly . The ringer used to work , but is broken now , dont want to take the base apart to look at it lol .

    MountainBiker ,
    No worries , I used to live in Maine , their infrastructure isnt the best . A lot of people in the country there still use dial up for internet , thats all they can get .

    #31782
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    MB – it is no doubt NOt technology. Iin the event of a major earthquake or tsunami, a car hitting a telephone pole, or a break in a cable in your area, the landline network could be damaged and will not function. So if electricity goes out you r old rotary should still work, but if something happens to the telephone line itself – no surprise – it won’t which is what I would think happened in your case.

    #31784
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Mtb,
    Land lines need cables from pole to pole too, so if the tree is big enough it will bring everything down. Everyone uses the same set of poles.

    #31789
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    That must be it, I don’t know exactly what cut off the power but it must have taken the phones out too. This is the 1st time the land lines or rotary phone didn’t work for us when the power went out. At least it was winter. When after a few hours the power company didn’t have a projection for when it would be fixed, we figured it would be a longer duration event, especially since it was still snowing, and we proceeded to empty the refrigerators/freezers into coolers and put them out in the snow. Not an option in the summer. In doing so we tossed some old stuff being we don’t often come to clean them out.

    #31790
    Profile photo of Ron S
    Ron S
    Survivalist
    member6

    MB, there are several things that could have happened that made your phones inoperable.
    1. The occurance that knocked your power out could have snapped the Telephone Cable if the cable was on poles anywhere between you and your Central Office or if the lead-in into your house was brought down by the same limbs that you went out to cut
    2. If a cable anywhere that feeds into your Central Office was brought down, it could cause the Central Office to see a massive number of people trying to get dial-tone at the same time. Did you try to get dial-tone again after a period of time? The Central Office is designed to test immediately for a receiver-off-hook and then furnish dial-tone or to lock it out if it determines that it is a false request, not necessarily from you.
    3. Another option is if you are on a Fiber-Optic cable (you will not be able to tell ). In the OLD DAYS, the Central Office funished 48 volt dial-tone on a pair of Copper wires. However, with the advent of fiber, they couldn’t put 48 volts out any more as it would damage the fiber( by the way, fiber is similar to those (toys ?) that look like a little tree where a flashlight is shone on one end of the fiber and the very end of the fiber glows brightly). If you are on fiber, you are SOL until you get your power back unless you have a cordless telephone system( a certain kind). The system that I have in my house has an option that if the power goes out, I can use the .power from the rechargeable batteries in my phone to make calls out with. unfortunately, I can not recerive calls because the batteries don’t have enough power to activate the ringer.
    Incidently, that was good thinking to try the rotary dial phone. There are times when some central office equipement may have a problem and not recognize the tones from your phone but will be ableto see the interupptions coming from a rotary phone Hope this helps. Ron S

    #31791
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    #1 had to of been it, though not at my house. Oddly enough being I live in a log home on a dirt road, though there are poles running up the road as you would expect, I have underground service from the pole to my house. Even better the poles are on the other side of the road so the trees along my wall aren’t subject to being trimmed by the power company.

    #31794
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MountainBiker, I think you need to have a ham radio that also works on batteries. If power goes down for a very long time this maybe the only way for you to get help.

    #31795
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Freedom, I am interested in pursuing ham radio. It’s on my list along with a few other things. I really need to take a step back and prioritize which projects to pursue 1st. I have a prepper friend about an hour and a half from here over in the Adirondacks who got his license this year and my son is thinking about it, If my son does it I definitely will.

    #31796
    Profile photo of Ron S
    Ron S
    Survivalist
    member6

    Roger on the not being trimmed by the power company, they are hired to keep the trees away from the lines, not how the trees look after trimming. Many years ago, I installed phones in a rural area. One old guy chased the phone people away everytime they came to talk to him about trimming his trees, which were right under the telephone and power lines. He had chased the power people away so often, they had decided to wait for the trees to interfere with his service and then they were going to tell him that they had to cut the trees or he would never get his electricity back.
    I was tasked by my boss to get them trimmed, regardless of how long it took because I had fixed his phone once and so he knew me. I asked if he could take time from his schedule to work with me to get them trimmed properly. We never had any problem with him after that except I was the only person he would let trim his trees, regardless of where I was located. He was a personal friend of one of the VIPs in AT&T. The company even had me out in a suit, on one of my visits to that end of the state, trimming his trees. Ron S

    #31797
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Ron, around here the power company seems to be pretty lax with the trimming. They really need to do more. Within a quarter mile of my house there are several deader than a door nail trees right next to the roadway and the utility lines, and neither the town, the power company, or the property owners have seen fit to take them down before they just fall down. This past autumn I paid to have a large dying tree out near the road on my property taken down. I had visions of it coming down in a storm and either hitting a car that happens to be driving by or taking out the utility lines on the other side of the road.

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