Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #3979
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    One of the ways I like to arrange my gear is to have roll out fabric mats of various sizes with elastic sewn in to hold various items in place, and to label those places. This kind of mat works for first aid kits, tools, fire kits; you name it, it might just work. Here is an example of a bag made by Blackhawk that uses the same elasticized  idea:

    I’ve seen many pouches and bags used for prepping kits, and they are often tightly packed and bulging with loose gear. When opened it can be hard to find a wanted item quickly, and a pain to repack the items back into a tight space.

    With an open roll out mat I can see everything at once, grab what I want, and it also lets me see if anything is missing from the kit and needs replacing. By having all the gear evenly and logically distributed and held in place by the elastic I can ensure there is a place for everything, and that everything is in its place.

    To reduce the chance of any gear dislodging and falling out the ends of a rolled up mat you can either fold over each side while making the mat to make pockets that will help close any openings, or make a sheath with a draw string to slide around the outside of the rolled up mat.

    Another advantage of a roll out mat is that hard items (like plastic and metal) that make noise when you move can be kept quiet by all the contents pressing against each other tightly while they’re rolled up.

    A mat that is rolled up can also be secured with a belt and buckle, or with velcro, and could also be attached to the outside of a back pack with the clever use of fasteners (I haven’t done this yet; I prefer to use the inside of a bag).

    It’s also good to add restraining cups under some items, especially heavier ones, to stop them from dropping out if you happen to pick up the mat while it’s open. If you have several roll out mats you can save yourself time by labeling the outside of each one, because they can start to look the same if made with the same fabric. Also use a heavy duty fabric that can withstand damage while still being flexible enough to be comfortable to use and carry.

    I also have to say that there is a limit to how large the items in the mat can be; the smaller the items the easier the mat will roll up, and obviously the mat can’t be rolled up if a gear item is too large.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #3982
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Some eastern block countries armies had rifle cleaning kit bags that looked exactly like you describing here. Mats with pockets, that are rolled up and carried in combat pack.
    With little “rearranging” it is good idea for first aid kits and similar.

    #3992
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I had a few tool pouches for wrenches designed this way. I think they could be obtained from tool suppliers. For larger mats with bigger pockets tool bags made for plastic buckets could be cut so they lay flat. The bags are $10.00 at home depot. No one could sew one for that cheap.

    #4043
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    During the first US Civil War many would have a bedroll worn like a bandoleer. Unrolled it was everything they owned at that time. Items such as coats, extra clothing, nice boots and etc were left at home. When needed
    letters were sent home, via members going to that area, to have the items shipped to the member.
    I started reading letters to home from the Civil War. On both sides the entries were the same:
    That members concern about his job (role in the military.)
    That members concern about his/her health.
    That members concern about the health and safety of his/her family members.

    Growing up and then as an adult I had always been concerned about helping others. I have now come
    to realize I am not worth anything if I am dead or severally injured.
    Like the airlines keep telling us: when in an emergency place the mask on yourself first!

    Robin

    #5104
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    Elijah,
    This is an excellent idea!
    I really never thought of this, or even anything remotely close.
    Thanks so much for sharing!
    Hannah

    #5111
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    This is very effective for many types of kit. In the military we use to have our hygiene/washing equipment, weapons cleaning kit, model making pack, and where necessary, instructional items stored/carried this way :)

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