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  • #12157
    Profile photo of Burnside3006
    Burnside3006
    Newbie
    member1

    Howdy,

    So I know several folks have dressed up their rifles with camouflage paint jobs. I have a few rifles that I’ve rattle canned myself. Using varying techniques like painters tape to try for tiger stripes or bags of nets. After that paint was stripped off with Powder Blaster (D’OH!) it was redone with a fishnet stocking for a much more impressive finish. Laundry bags and nettings work fine, but fishnets seem to make things more interesting. I still have the “Pinestraw” technique to try or use some other vegetation.

    Recently I was reviewing the refinishing page over on ar15.com for info on another project I’m working on and found the idea for Sponge Camo. Basically, apply a base coat with another color to break up the lines and then using a “Natural” sponge, alternate the colors onto the other shade, and maybe add another color or 2. After I caroused the picture thread awhile, I decided to try it myself.

    http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_6_19/321800_.html

    I choose the colors Brown, Army Green, and Sand as what best resembles my surrounding terrain.First, I painted up a piece of scrap wood. With a base coat of Army Green, then I sprayed some Sand.

    Then cutting up and using the “Sea Sponge” I found, I tried dabbing the colors to try to meld them.Threw on some Brown for a little contrast and that was pretty much my pattern. I’m fairly pleased with the Sea Sponge but the natural sponge make for better designs and not have a distinct finished line. When using the sponge, I tried to remember the old saying, “Just a little Dab will do ya.” I didn’t need to try to sop up all the paint to smear. I just varied up my design with either light or heavy pressings.

    I chose a Remington 870 to be the test weapon. I disassembled it some for better coverage. I went over it a few times with sponge sections of different cuts. I could have used a dark green for a little more contrast and better coverage. Finished it off with a flat clear coat and that’s it. In the end, it’s camo and it helps you hide out in the sage.

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    #12160
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Burnside3006, does the paint on the barrel hold the heat? Is there a paint that you use for this.

    #12163
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    i have seen a local powder coater putting camo  on weapon parts with something called ceraKoat

    Have heard  of a AR platform using nickle boron coating http://legionfirearms.com/

    #12170
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I have seen some very good jobs done with rattle cans , but the good ones seem to be the guys that use cardboard templates or other things to more control the fog . My thing is German Flecktarn camo , I have had some ideas floating around in my head about making templates , but not put into practice yet , Its not an easy one to duplicate and look good , but I found that a round artist brush gives you a good representation of it , I tried using the Brown as a base , then OD as a base , OD seems to work the best .

    #12240
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I used a brush and had some fun with my Mossberg 500.

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    #12243
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thats not bad ! it would do the job .

    #12248
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    1974, You are an artist! Looking good.

    #12258
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    There are a number of methods other than ‘krylon’ available to the do it yourself’er.

    Cerakoat is available in both air-dry and oven-dry versions that can be sprayed with a automotive touch-up sprayer.
    You need to bead/sand blast the gun first for best adherence, but you can get a good finish assuming you degrease and rough up the surface. It’s liquid only, no premade cans, and costs more than the others, but lasts better also.

    GunKote is available in rattle cans, the same applies to blasting and degreasing but it’s oven sure only. It’s a little easier to spray and is more forgiving to the hobbyist, but is oven cure only.

    AlumaHyde II, is also available in rattle cans, is suitable for firearm exteriors only, as it’s a thick coating but it goes on fairly easy. Roughing the surface helps but you don’t have to although the finish won’t adhere as well. It like the air-dry Cerakote, can be applied to wood, plastic and scopes as it’s air dry.

    CeramaCoat, is not recommended, it’s oven-cure and hasn’t held up well in my experience.

    Dura-Coat is basically nothing more than rebranded Sherwin-Williams Polane-T epoxy paint. Like the AlumaHyde it’s thick and only really suitable for exteriors. But it’s also available now in rattle cans, @$35 a can though.

    I do a couple of finish jobs every couple of weeks.
    Recommendations, degrease, bake, degrease, bake degrease, bake, degrease, warm, spray.
    Allow to cure then either bake the part or leave it alone for a week for it to cure (air dry).

    Hot summer day? Leave the gun/parts in the sun for a while to warm up for spraying.

    You can’t degrease enough, especially with old mil-surp guns.

    Me, I’m running mostly GunKote and Alumahyde II on my/our guns.
    I’ve tried the rest, the Cerakote is becoming a favorite both for colors available and durability but it’s more difficult to work with, unlike the GunKote it doesn’t harden before you ‘bake’ it and the slightest touch will mar the finish before its baked/cured.
    The GunKote you can let dry, then handle carefully when/before baking.

    One word of caution, the AlumaHyde II can be removed with liberal applications of DEET. (Oops)
    Haven’t tried it again though.

    High temperature automotive paint and high temp Bar-B-Que paint is popular but is often too shiny and definitely too ‘brittle’ for hard use.

    A little info that may help:

    http://www.arizonaresponsesystems.com/notes/notesfinish/metal/pagemetal.shtml

    http://www.arizonaresponsesystems.com/notes/notesfinish/wood/pagewood.shtml

    #12281
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I did that paint job about 25 or 30 years ago. I don’t remember what I used for paint, other than it was nothing special.

    Free, I am an artist. I don’t paint or draw too much any more though. Fingers are too stiff for fine work. Now I work with stone.

    #12287
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Very nice job 1974!

    #12320
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    1974, I never done painting art so I am not sure if I can do an art job like yours. I am a stain glass art work for a hobby, do windows for my home and some friends. I do think that once an artist always an artist so you are still an artist.

    Sometimes an artist thinks the things he or she does are very easy and that anyone can do them, but this is not true. It is easy for you only. Some of us are born with this.

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