Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #20550
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    So I was wondering if any of you guys have ever made your own solar panels. From what I can tell you can get the stuff to do it easily and for a pretty low cost for a good output. Have any of you guys done that, or know of anyone who has?

    It might be a good idea to have some stuff to make a few, and have the knowledge to make them of course, stored away in your preps should you ever need some extra power output, or as a replacement.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #20588
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Passive solar, yes.

    The plexiglass involved can also be used to repair windows after storms and such.
    Long as you have spare in your back room that is.

    #20600
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Mr. Red – the prices of panels have come down so much…by the time you buy materials and factor in the cost of your labor to make them…there are lots of great deals on panels now

    #20604
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    tweva is right, the prices have come down to the point that the materials and labor cost more and the one you make will not be as good. I look at it and didn’t work.

    #20612
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Tweva and Freedom, are you talking passive or PV solar panels?

    #20631
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirlibird, This one is very good http://www.renogy-store.com/100W-Mono-p/rng-100d.htm 100w panel for $149.00 and free shipping. I have found them cheaper but this one is very good.

    #20633
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Be better to buy them , they are getting cheaper and more efficient as time goes on . I did take a class on photovoltaic systems ( required unfortunately ) , they are very simple , but you cant just throw them up willy nilly and expect to get good power out of them all year . There is a thing on the internet called PV Watts , it gives you the best direction for the area in which you live . Most systems in the US are what they call interactive systems , you are using both your solar cells and the power company , you have two meters . For completely off grid , is called a stand alone system , they are the most difficult to get balanced , you need an inverter , batteries , planning for the average number of no sun days in your area , etc .how you set them up is important also , depends on what you are trying to achieve . Series or/ and parallel makes a difference as well , in what you can get out of them .Some power companies here in the Southwest , where the sun is a curse , rather than a blessing , use solar to heat water for steam turbines .

    #20636
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Aha, there is the difference, you are both talking about PV systems.

    Whereas I was referring to passive heat exchange systems.

    I have set up a number of passive systems over the years, some as part of houses, one as the “power” for a dehydrator, and add on systems to help heat a house cheaply.

    Both have their uses, but one literally costs nothing to ‘run’ once its set up.

    #20637
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    Good stuff, thanks guys.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #20647
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirlibird,
    If you have time add a post on PV system and how to build them.

    #20661
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    In a PV (solar creating voltage) there are three parts:
    1. The panel itself changes energy from the sun into Direct Current Voltage.
    2. The charge controller takes care of making sure there is just the right amount of charging happening to the batteries you use to store energy to use later.
    3. The Inverter is used to change the voltage from DC to AC.

    I have two small portable systems: One system is used to keep a 12 volt electric wheelchair battery charged. I have it in the window of my radio room.
    Another system I keep in the car. If I have to bug out from here or I can not get back to here then it will be used to power a few devices and to keep the car battery charged.

    Both combined cost me less than $90.00. Ebay.
    Robin

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