Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 32 total)
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  • #26871
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Well, come to think about it. I’ve got a good friend competing for South Africa in the International Practical Shooting Confederation (IPSC) in Florida. It is pretty exciting doing as a sport. Just enjoy !

    #26937
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>c wrote:</div>Safety is very important to me. We triple lock our guns as required by law.

    My husband and I are working about procedures for bring the guns into the woods. We never have the guns loaded and we keep our clips in our pocket. We never use the safety on the guns. The clips only goes into the guns when we are ready to fire. The clips are removed from the guns after shooting. The guns are visually checked for being free of ammunition.

    Anything else we should be thinking about?

    C,

    A couple things you should really think about and need to know:
    1) Just because you lock up your firearms does not mean that you can handle them safely. Moving around with them and ensuring you don’t point then in any direction you do not want to shoot is always the #1 step in becoming a safe firearm owner.
    2) Clips are things you put on Doritos bags to keep them fresh. Magazines are where ammunition is stored. Knowing the proper terminology is also important so you can properly communicate with others about firearms. It seems trivial, but it will get you locked out of a conversation very quickly in many circles.
    3) You can carry a magazine in your firearm safely. What I do and what used to be taught as the safest method of carrying a firearm was to always leave the chamber empty. In teaching terms “don’t put a ‘bullet’ into the barrel where you can pull the trigger to make it shoot.” In “gun person” terms “don’t chamber a round.” The “chamber” is where the cartridge goes into the barrel so that you can “slide” the bolt/action forward and allow it to shoot.
    4) Practice carrying around an empty firearm that has the action locked to the rear, an Airsoft rifle, or Nerf gun while you are hanging around your home. This will allow you to become acutely aware of the muzzle and how to move around with the firearm without endangering anyone.
    5) Especially since you are new to firearms, get in the habit of locking the action to the rear so that it is wide open and no chance for the firearm to discharge. If you have semi-autos that means that you have to pull the “slide” to the rear and push the button that locks it into an open position.
    6) Get good with safely handling your firearm. The most secured and locked up firearm is still a potential hazard if the person handling it cannot do it safely.

    Those are just a few things I thought about and tossed out there. Again, I would suggest a hunter’s safety course and some NRA begginer courses in addition to all the practicing you need to do. New people should spend at least 4 hours practicing muzzle control and safely operating the firearm for every 1 hour they are actively shooting it. That was an old number that was taught to me back in the day that made sense.

    Welcome to the gun owner’s fold, btw. Forgot to say that earlier.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #26988
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #26993
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    C, your husband is absolutely right about the safety. As a rule, I always point the gun in a safe direction. I’ve had one to many rifles pointed at me, even unloaded ones, and I always feel like slapping whoever it is for it. Especially when they act like your the weird one cause its “unloaded”.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #26994
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    C, Every gun is loaded all the time, muzzle control is paramount as Sled jockey stated. However in a self defense situation having the magazine in your pocket is a bad idea. It’s really not so great for hunting either as you will discover. It might work for a long range shot but most animals are not going to stay in front of you while you move your arms and load the gun.

    #26995
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #27053
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #27054
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #27056
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    Always treat guns as if they are loaded. Even if the slide it locked back or the bolt is removed. The reason for this is very simple.

    Empty guns kill people. This was my Dad’s mantra for gun handling when I was a kid.

    We have all seen the news report of an accidental shooting because someone thought the gun was empty. They all say the same thing. If I thought it was loaded I would not have pointed it at my friend, sibling, parent, etc.

    If you follow this rule you will greatly reduce the likelihood of someone accidentally getting shot.

    My Dad taught me this as a child. He would freak out and knock a gun out of your hands and slap you if you pointed a gun in his direction. It was a bit harsh, but my brother and I learned very quickly to always be aware or where the barrel is pointed.

    You will notice that people will handle a gun very differently, to the point of complete indifference as to where it is pointed, when they believe it is unloaded. This is not a good practice.

    #27065
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Pheonix, your dad was 100% right! Never point a gun at anyone.

    #27077
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Pheonix wrote:</div>Always treat guns as if they are loaded. Even if the slide it locked back or the bolt is removed. The reason for this is very simple.

    Empty guns kill people. This was my Dad’s mantra for gun handling when I was a kid.

    We have all seen the news report of an accidental shooting because someone thought the gun was empty. They all say the same thing. If I thought it was loaded I would not have pointed it at my friend, sibling, parent, etc.

    If you follow this rule you will greatly reduce the likelihood of someone accidentally getting shot.

    My Dad taught me this as a child. He would freak out and knock a gun out of your hands and slap you if you pointed a gun in his direction. It was a bit harsh, but my brother and I learned very quickly to always be aware or where the barrel is pointed.

    You will notice that people will handle a gun very differently, to the point of complete indifference as to where it is pointed, when they believe it is unloaded. This is not a good practice.

    Exactly…. Practice, practice, practice that muzzle control before you ever worry about learning to shoot.

    Glad to see others on here that feel the same way about muzzle control and safety.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #27092
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>freedom wrote:</div>Pheonix, your dad was 100% right! Never point a gun at anyone.

    Unless they need shooting.

    #27292
    Profile photo of Novus Ordo
    Novus Ordo
    Hunter
    rprepper

    C – you got some good advice here already, but let me add a little bit more if I may. Don’t worry about being a nervous wreck – that’s a good thing because it makes you pay double attention to what’s going on. It’s the people who aren’t nervous to begin with that become dangerous later on when they become complacent. Watch out hanging around them as they will “forget” their guns are loaded while waving them around at camp! Yikes!!! Take it slow and the more you handle your weapon in the multiple scenarios the better you will feel and the more natural it will become. Eventually it will become second nature. U.S. Marine recruits go through a full week of firearm safety, functioning, sighting in positions, and dry fire before they even get to shoot the first round. It doesn’t happen overnight, but through repetition you’ll be fine. We were all ignorant to begin with – no one here will talk down to you – we’re just glad to be able to help a little and glad you asked!

    On hunting with a firearm – agree with 74 and Sledjockey, having to dig out a magazine out of your pocket (especially when you are “hiding’ behind something) will be difficult at best. Then silently trying to place the magazine in the weapon, then silently releasing the bolt to chamber a round, then sighting in on the animal – you get the picture. That rabbit will probably be long gone, let alone any type of bird. Animals are extremely wary to different sounds and movements that are not natural to their environment – I’ve had many of them get away just because they heard the very slight “click” of the safety being disengaged. Some animals like turkeys have such good eyesight that you’ll be lucky if you can slightly move the muzzle to aim in before they bust you and take off.

    Use of the safety should be incorporated into your training – it just adds another feature that keeps things safe. Yes, they do fail, but IMHO it’s extremely rare – I’ve never had one do so, nor do I know anyone who has (although I’m sure some others may have). So you have constant muzzle awareness, magazine out of gun (in your case), round out of chamber and safety on. Eventually you will run into firearms with an internal or incorporated magazine. The only way to keep them at the same level of safety that having the magazine out is to keep them completely empty. Then you’ll be fooling around with individual rounds that need to be loaded in the gun magazine, then chambered, then sighted in while the quarry is getting further away. I won’t try and tell you that you’re wrong with the magazine out – you can progress later once you’re comfortable if you want. Back to the safety – lets say that you somehow get a rabbit to stay still and lets you put your magazine into the gun, chamber a round and sight in – what happens when you go to pull the trigger and the gun doesn’t fire? You panic and pull the trigger again – still nothing! It’s only then that you take the muzzle off the target and realize that somehow the safety was accidentally bumped “half on” and wouldn’t let you fire. If you train to always keep the safety on then after that round is chambered and you’re sighted in your last action would be to take the safety off. It becomes natural. Let me add another “what if”. You’re using a semi-auto shotgun with a tube magazine attached to the firearm. The magazine is loaded, but no shell is chambered. You see some geese coming in from a ways out so you push the bolt release button and the bolt chambers the first round followed immediately by a “BOOM!”. What happened? The shotgun slam fired when the bolt was released – it shouldnt’ have, but it did. You’ve just been scared to death, the geese turned and flew away, if only you’d used the shotgun safety to keep the hammer from falling. Get the jist? Use the safety – added to the rest it’s just another way to keep an accident from happening.

    Okay, HTH – again, glad to see your willingness to learn and seek advice!

    Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property... mischief would ensue were the law-abiding deprived of the use of them.
    - Thomas Paine

    #27375
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #27377
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    C,
    Use both poles and make a small X at the bottom of the grips. Use an extra strap to secure them to gether. You adjust the height by making the bottom of the poles either wider or narrower. This setup is more stable than a single stick and is in common use the world over for hunting.

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