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  • #6005
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

     

     

    Primer mixes composition and behaviour.

    Marco Morin

    Ph.D.

     

    In this short article I tried to assemble some information on small arms primer mixes withregard to the formation of gunshot residues (GSR), a topic not yet well known at least in theforensic domain. Indeed, after the eminent study of the late dr. Basu

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    written more than 30years ago, as far as I know the problem has never been researched again and quite ofteninaccurate assertions are found in articles published by academic peer-reviewed journals.The authors cited are the actual creators of the following pages: I trust they shall forgive mefor any mistake in interpreting their scientific production.

    The most remarkable thing about the history of percussion primers is the total absence of anyradical changes or brilliant improvements, since their invention, such as have occurred in the fieldof propellant powders. Modern primers are very much the same as the first primers made by Forsythin 1807, containing 70.6 parts of potassium chlorate, 11.8 parts of charcoal, and 17.6 ,arts of sulphur. Important improvements have been made in the uniformity and reliability of primers, butthe priming charge still consists, as it has for the last century, of a heterogeneous mixture of  granular substances, capable of taking fire when struck. The remark has frequently been made that primers are still in the “black powder” stage of development

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    #6119
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    1974,

    Man… how to put this without sticking my foot in it?

    Back during WWII, there was a massive shortage of not only loaded ammo, but also reloading components that makes our current ammo shortage (The Great Ammo Shortage of 2013/14) look like the Land of Plenty.

    A couple smart guys, with professional help, worked out the chemistry of non-corrosive primers and the correct safety protocols needed to re-watt primers. They self-published in a small book that today is rather hard to come by. I happen to have a copy of this book. It’s not for the faint of heart, and I’ll be straight with you – buying and mixing the chemicals listed will probably bring you to the attention of a certain government agency, and that is No Bueno.

    In fact, I am so paranoid about coming to anyone’s attention that I won’t even list the chemicals/elements in the book – even if I don’t list the ratios, methodology and safety protocols, I feel that just listing them might earn me a “visit”… and I don’t want a “visit”.

    I will, however, list the publication and anyone wanting to can hunt down their own copy. What they do with their new-found knowledge ain’t my problem and ain’t my responsibility… it’s just a book.

    “Primers for Small Arms Cartridges” by M.J. Albert and H.F. Oelberg, Copyright March, 1944.

    Some of the chemicals listed are benign, like Iron (III) Oxide. Some are not, like powdered Aluminum. Some can be made from precursor chemicals, some are poisonous. Don’t be stupid.

    Disclaimer: IF you, dear reader, actually do hunt down and obtain a copy of this book, I urge you to stay within the letter of the law and please, for the love of God, follow the safety protocols to the letter. I don’t want anyone in jail or worse – reduced to individual Prepper molecules. I’m a big fan of individual responsibility…. meaning, what you do with your new knowledge is on you…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #6278
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Malgus,
    Quite right there are many hazardous issues to contend with including current laws. Pyrotechnic plants blow up frequently under very controled conditions.

    To bad all warning labels couldn’t be so simple, “Don’t Be Stupid”

    #6300
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    As one who has been reloading for over a quarter century including reloading several unusual rimfire cartridges, I will say avoid the home brew primers.

    It’s much too cheap to swing into your local gun shop and pick up a hundred primers (or more) a week without hurting your budget. And it’s so much safer that it’s not worth speaking of.

    If you’re going to reload, buy your supplies now, learn how to reload if you do not know how, and store your reloading gear in that proverbial cool dry place.

    #6310
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly,
    No question about it buing now is what to do. At .03 a primer and with the safety and reliability issue of making your own it would be foolish. BUT if you run out after shtf and want your smoke pole to go bang knowing how won’t hurt you (well it could actually) . As I see it the whole discussion of shtf scenarios is a hypothetical of what if for how long. Long term for me is the more you know the better off you will be.

    #6316
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    I understand and agree, but for the beginner/novice the remanufacture of primers should be avoided without serious education and experience.

    There have been a number of home rolled methods talked about over the years, some border on the rediculous, some the dangerous.

    In my experience, carefully decapping a primed case and reusing that primer is safer and much more reliable, although still not a good method, is much better for the shooter and gun.

    With so much information out there, one has to ask not just can this be done, but also is it safe and should it be done.

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