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  • #48404
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    While PM is not nearly as interesting or romantic as the zombie squirrel apocalypse, it’s likely more important than most things for most of us

    When was the last time you changed the line in your fishing rods? In your tackle box?
    If you’re like me, it was last year with little or no use. But before that, it had been a while. Lets just say that the line in the reels had gotten slightly brittle while hanging in the garage.

    How about oiling the reels? I blew the dust of three construction projects off my fishing bag and rods.
    We won’t comment on how the grease inside looked.

    Bait? Lures? If you’re running certain types of bait, is it all dried out, nasty and useless, or is that bottle of spray still holding it’s own or leaked all over the tackle box/bucket?

    Knives….
    When was the last time you touched up the edges of your knives? Oiled the hinges? Knocked off any corrosion off the edge of a coated blade? That hatchet in your BOB, it still rust free after spending a winter in a humid trunk?

    Firearms…
    Recoil and magazine springs?
    Night sights still work?
    Batteries on weapons lights still good?

    How about your flashlights?
    Have an older Mag-Lite here that the switch is going bad, just put new batteries in it and the lights brightness varies with each touch of the switch. Glad I checked before trusting it fully.

    Look around, dump out your BOB and check every item for expired items, rust and corrosion.
    Check you house tools for the same. I have an axe, a sledgehammer and two shovels that need new handles. And what the kids did to a hatchet edge making kindling this last year is criminal.

    Look around, what do you find?

    • This topic was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by Whirlibird Whirlibird.
    #48409
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Guilty on all counts and then some. Good reminder.

    A related aspect to this is even knowing where stuff is. I have so much preps packed away or set aside that I often either can’t find what I am looking for or even remember that I have it.

    #48410
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Cataloging preps helps immensely.
    Especially when you add date codes to assist your rotation and replacements.

    Still working on this myself.

    #48417
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Very guilty as well. Interestingly, my wife and I were just recently talking about this very subject, and hit on an idea that – while not fool proof – is a heck of a lot better than letting time fly by as it does in later years. We’ve found that our call phone calendars are wonderful reminders for upcoming appointments, etc. Heck – I set a reminder for a an event that occurs tomorrow morning before I usually even get up (one of the “perks” of retirement – not setting an alarm most days). I’d totally forgotten about it – until my 12-hour “reminder” alarm went off just a few hours ago. OH! I need to get to bed earlier tonight, and set the alarm for early tomorrow. The same sort of reminder happened about a week ago on something I’d forgotten about, and had set a reminder alarm to go off mid-evening the night before. That’s what triggered the idea to set up “check-and-recharge dates” for key batteries we have, including the small Goal Zero power supply we got a year or so ago. It holds a nice charge, but can’t sit forever, and can be quickly ruined if it goes to “dead” and stays that way too long. I just recharged some little AAA and AA cells last week, and realized I’d let a few go much too long, they’d corroded, and were beyond salvage when I tried to condition and recharge them.

    The same can be true for virtually anything else – put it in the electronic calendar, and set a “reminder” alarm for a time I’m likely to be awake, so I can be reminded and start planning my schedule around the maintenance items coming up. Unfortunately, I’d only thought about the battery recharges – until this thread. Now we need to go through our items and schedule the PM on the appropriate list of things. Thanks, Whirlibird – this triggered a solution to a problem I’d “forgotten” I even had.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #48418
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Very true , breaking things down , cleaning them , inspecting for wear and tear , then getting it fixed may save you a lot of heartache down the road . As mentioned , setting aside the time to do that is where most of us are guilty of failing .

    #48419
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Somewhat related to this discussion is rotation of food storage. On shorter term things like store-bought canned goods with maybe a 2-year shelf life (give or take), we took a tax refund a few years ago and purchased several of the Cansolidator units available at Thrive Foods. They’re like the Campbells Soup displays in many grocery stores where you pull out a can sitting on its side at the bottom of a unit that loads from above, and the cans roll down one by one as the bottom ones are removed. The adjustable units such as the Cansolidator are a bit pricey, but over time (and found on sale from time to time), they allow you to keep the oldest canned food at the bottom of the unit, and the furthest out expiration dates at the top of the unit – FIFO style (first in, first out, rolling down from top to bottom as stock is removed and replaced). Home made units can be fashioned as well. They even have large units to hold #10 cans such as what’s found in freeze dried and dehydrated long term storage foods. No more expiration of cans back in the corner of a closet or cupboard, potentially.

    http://www.thrivelife.com/all-products/frs-food-rotation-systems/the-cansolidator-series.html

    We have large storage shelves, so we got the Pantry Plus size (they will NOT fit in a normal kitchen cupboard, however – too deep). Don’t pay full retail – check for sales, check Amazon, or find a dealer and see if you can get a dealer-sale price (sometimes they have access to good deals that aren’t necessarily advertised on line, or else they know ahead of time when a sale is coming). These can be stacked two-high, so four units can easily fit on one large storage shelf unit such as what’s found at Sam’s Club, Costco, etc., with room still left over for other shelves. Great use of space.

    By the way – we volunteer at a food bank, and have been told on very reliable authority that almost any non-damaged can is safe for up to two years past the date shown on the top or bottom of a can. Some nutrition value is lost over time, but it’s still safe if the can is completely intact (no dents around the seams on the rim, large dents in the sides that create a sharp point or edge on the dent, where tiny cracks could happen, etc).

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #48427
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    GS, another aspect of canned goods longevity is the temperature it is stored at. For example a cool/cold basement will have things last years longer than a warm/hot garage or shed. This is one advantage of cold northern climates where pretty much everyone has a basement.

    Generally speaking I need to start from scratch more or less reorganizing my stuff in the basement which is where most of the preps are. The garage & storage room above could use a good cleaning but it is moderately organized being I did that when I moved all of the gardening related supplies into the new greenhouse/potting shed the year before last. The house closets could use a going through so as to make room for household stuff that otherwise gets shoved into the basement competing for space with preps.

    #48429
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    And as you accumulate more and more stuff the need for PM grows and grows.

    #48434
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    White lithium grease is good on bicycle chains and guns. As long as we keep the humidity low the tools stay relatively rust free. Belts and brushes on motors have to be replaced occasionally. Definitely have to chech and throw out old batteries. One d battery swells up in a maglight 6 battery flashlight that’s the end of it. Wheel bearings need to be greased. Oil changed in vehicles. New plugs. Generators have to be started and run. Old gas flushed. The lawn waits for no man.

    #48441
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Concerning gas, before we lived where we do now I used to rotate my stored gas into the vehicles twice a year without problem. Now I keep 60 gallons or so set aside in 5 gallon containers but it is sequentially rotated into the lawnmower, 60 gallons being less than a year’s supply given the expanse I am mowing. I fill each container again as they empty so I always have 60 gallons. At the end of the season I add Stabil to it for the winter.

    The white lithium does work well for bike chains. Rusty chains make you work a whole lot harder pedaling, so keep them greased.

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