Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #10648
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Hello everyone!

    What I am going to try to do is show you how to make the most of small spaces so you can still build your home store while living in an apartment.

     

    You can build your store regardless of the size of your home.

    I’ll be honest – I never even considered the difficulties of apartment life until I moved my brother from a two story farmhouse to a TINY place in a big city. Storage space became a luxury he couldn’t afford, and that was even before I started prepping!  When I began planning for future emergencies with him, I discovered some ground rules that all apartment dwellers should follow:

     

    Ditch the clutter and get organized

    First become motivated to clean out closets!!  When we realized how much water could be stored in them. I had to look at him and ask. what was more important: 10 pairs of outdated jeans or 30 gallons of water that could someday save you life?

     

    Don’t do everything at once

    His first goal was to stockpile two weeks’ worth of food. After that, next goal was to store enough food to last one month….then two months…and so on. The same goes for water and medical supplies. You won’t get overwhelmed if you start small!

     

    Discover creative ways to disguise your storage

    Is your pantry spilling over into your living room? Prolly right…but that doesn’t mean that it can’t be pretty! His 30-gallon water container is currently sitting under a small piece of plywood and with a nice piece of fabric; no one knows that it’s anything but a table! His bed side tables…well hehe aren’t bedside tables so to speak. He has filled milk crates with can and dry goods and done the same as the 30 gallon container.board on top covered with a nice fabric. Under the bed storage bins are another great source.

     

    Label EVERYTHING

    If you rely on storage boxes to keep you organized, you’ll easily forget which essentials are in which boxes. Even clear bins can get confusing if you use them to store more than one type of item.  Clearly list the contents of each container, preferably on both the box and its lid. Sharpies are my best friend.

     

    Make a spreadsheet

    List which resources you have stored, where they’re located, and when they expire. There’s nothing worse than spending half an hour looking for your extra bandages when you REALLY need them. If only you could have remembered that they were in your third dresser drawer!  The same rule applies to food…when you’re already cooking dinner and realize you’re out of milk, you’ll want your instant milk to be on hand right away. .

    Any collapsible survival tool is your friend!

    Flat water bottles, ponchos that fit in your pocket, tiny (yet powerful) flashlights…as long as you don’t have to sacrifice functionality.

    Your balcony can also become a area to collect water, or even grow a small garden.

    After this is all said and done, Your friends right here SHTF forum, will even add more ideas to help you along.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #10686
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Gypsy one of the hardest part of an SHTF in an apartment building is how to protect the floor you are in and the floor under and above. Some one can start a fire below and you will be in trouble.

    The do have to plan with as many in the building.

    #10691
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    They also have to look into at some point being able to escape as well. Likely with out elevators, which gives stairs one option as well as balconies if your on a lower level. Protection wise if your able yes like Freedom said you need to secure the apt under you and above you. If your apt balcony joins to another off your right or left these will need to be secured as well.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #17703
    Profile photo of Overlord
    Overlord
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Hello
    Very good post, I live in a small apartment and now I was started the small storage. Your post helped me very much. thanks

    #25717
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    Grow plenty of food in an apartment: http://www.3dponics.com/

    #28185
    Profile photo of JustWaiting
    JustWaiting
    Survivalist
    member1

    Also, make friends with your neighbors. Discretely, find out who could be of help or like minded and also, those you need to keep and eye on. In my apartment complex, a few like minded neighbors and I walked the perimeter finding secure points and those that needed more work. We also have a lot of older people that know canning, sewing, etc. In a perfect scenario, we could be a self-sufficient area with places to plant crops, water nearby and enough people to secure our assets. I try to think of it more as a community than as just as lone-wolfing it.
    But of course, when the SHTF all of that could be pipe dreams.

    #36119
    Profile photo of Corvus
    Corvus
    Survivalist
    member4

    Essential for all homes but especially an apartment is a solid fire extinguisher for your own and neighbor’s unexpected fires. Also, have a pole, cane, walking stick near the windows to break them out if need be, as well as solid locks dead bolt because of the traffic that in and out of apartment buildings and you want to slow down anyone from breaking in. Be sure your peep hole works and a rope ladder that can offer you a chance to leave out the window if there’s a fire. Third floor apartments are more often the target of a break in than first and second floors because the crook has the advantage to turn around and start walking downstairs if he/she hears someone coming up the steps. Keep a small go bag near the front or rear exit so if needed there it is in a hurry. If you want to keep the neighbors below you “on the cool side/happy” try walking around indoors only in your slippers, flip-flops or socks. They might have less complaints to toss your way. It sucks to have neighbors that smoke and their toxic exhaust comes your way, that goes for laundry soaps too.

    #36132
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Concerning fire escapes, my last house had an old fashioned 3rd floor walk around type attic. The kids used to play up there in the spring and autumn when it was neither too hot or too cold and so I kept one of those portable fire escape ladders at the base of one of the windows. I don’t recall what it cost but it wasn’t very expensive.

    #36148
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    If you live in a small space what are your ultimate goals after shtf. I’m thinking all your planning has to be focused on bugging out to a sustainable location. Urban fortress or rural hideout.

    #36181
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    In a SHTF times I am with 74, it will be very hard to defend your self and your family in an apartment building. Some nut my light up the building and the fire will burn it down. I see this all over Downtown Miami were there are condos that have 50 to 70 floors up. The top is full of condos worth in the millions of dollars.

    How will they get out when the electricity stops?

    I live in a house and the city is 16 to 20 miles away from those condos. Many will die there.

    #39184
    Profile photo of Corvus
    Corvus
    Survivalist
    member4

    Miami won’t be worth much in a few decades, best to sell and get north, or move way southern zone of the Americas. Habla Espanol ya’ll,
    Apartments are poorly suited for long-term storage, it really depends how much do you need for your survival?

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