Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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  • #31518
    Profile photo of tukie2
    tukie2
    Survivalist
    member3

    I am a firm believer that prepping and survival is not all about the physical aspects…food, water, skills, etc. I think most of it is mind set. Are you mentally prepared for what is coming? My husband had PTSD from the military. He did his best to help us gain knowledge before he passed away, but I could see his writing on the wall way before. IMO, I think he thought he was strong enough…he had seen war, but he was broken.
    I see the collapse, not as a zombie apocalypse where people are storming the fort to steal from you, but a slow insidious draining of resources, hope, and strength, intermixed with short bursts of protecting your stuff…along with a daily fight to get resources. What are some things that you are planning to have on hand to keep up moral, and to keep from getting worn down emotionally? How are you going to keep from being depressed?

    #31538
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Much depends on your coping mechanism.

    I have seen guys rise to the occasion while others fall heavily in literally the same situation.

    Personally, I wore my badge as my shield, my uniform as a protective layer. I became a different person when wearing it.
    And when it came off, so did the stress and worries.

    Down time, goofy slapstick movies, classics and so on.
    Fantasy books, the kids were amazed to find dad had a full set of the Harry Potter books in the bookcase. That escape, that few pages of fantasy and stress vanished.
    Or watching Bogie and Bacal together, or John Wayne beating the bad guys.

    The military has long shown movies in camp, so people can turn it off for a couple of hours. My uncle spoke of Bob Hope in Vietnam, my grandfather of Hope in WWII. That connection to the world, to normalcy.

    Me, I keep a number of books around, both manuals and fiction.
    I keep a bunch of movies that my wife hates around, they’re my connection to condition white.

    During particularly bad cases, I’d occasionally sneak off in my patrol car and watch an old Sherlock Holmes movie, letting my brain take abit of time off. Invariably, I’d have the answer by the end of the movie. One investigator I knew would go out and play a couple games of chess, a grandmaster level player, his subconscious would take the down time and put it all together.

    Find what works for you and run with it.

    #31541
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    That’s really cool Whirli!
    In my electrical meanderings, I do that in my sleep ;)
    Maybe I need to find a good diverting hobby, I think reloading would be great for diversion.
    So disciplined, and mechanical, and repetitive…

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #31542
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    @Tukie2:

    I’d say you have the biggest aspect covered, the mental. It’s probably 1/2 the battle.

    Whirli-Bird is our resident gunsmith… :D

    She’s almost a blank canvas on guns, Whirli! Just Sayin’… ;)

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #31543
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>undeRGRönd wrote:</div>That’s really cool Whirli!<br>
    In my electrical meanderings, I do that in my sleep ;)<br>
    Maybe I need to find a good diverting hobby, I think reloading would be great for diversion.<br>
    So disciplined, and mechanical, and repetitive…

    I’ve watched the entire 12 seasons of Morse. Each episode is 2 hours. With all its twists and turns it is very divirting. (BBC crime drama)

    watch reload watch reload watch reload ….. 1 per night

    #31544
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Usually I listen to music while reloading. Even though reloading is repetitive, it requires concentration/observation to avoid mishaps that could be dangerous. If your mind is to pre-occupied or stressed when you start you could make a mistake more easily then if you are relaxed.

    #31548
    Profile photo of tukie2
    tukie2
    Survivalist
    member3

    We have a family game night. I run “What would you do if…’ scenarios past my boys…then we talk about why they would do that and what would be a poor decision vs a good one…some of their responses are hysterical. We make it into fun, instead of scary. Once in a while, we will go outside in the snow or some such thing and have contests to see who can start a fire with what you can find around and one match. Just training with out the fear on my part…I am teaching and relieving my own anxieties while they are having fun.

    #31550
    Profile photo of tukie2
    tukie2
    Survivalist
    member3

    Yep, and I am here to learn.

    #31552
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    When my group and I deployed it might mean 4 to 6 months of 20 hour days. Like Whirlibird, Underground and others mentioned small things make a difference. From passing out hard candy I had stashed to a “mosh pit” it helped. A real treat was getting and sending “FamGrams” via back channels to families and friends. Cell phones, Sat phones or iPads/Pods were not allowed on these trips.
    Robin

    #31559
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Tukie2, I am sorry to hear about your husband’s PTSD. That’s really hard for the whole family. :(

    I think stress is a real killer. Finding ways to enjoy life on a daily basis keeps me balanced. Prioritizing what’s really important to me, gets the right stuff done today.

    I think it’s really important to have a strategy to deal with the things that cause us internal stress. Everyone is different. I can only tell you about the things that worked for me: meditation, Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP), self-hypnosis, Emotion Freedom Technique (EFT), prayer, etc.

    I also found to my surprise the old school of Stoic philosophy really helped me learn how to use negative visualization, trichotomy of control and voluntary discomfort can help develop a survivor mentality. The trichotomy of control was a real eye-opener for me. The trichotomy of control helps identify the things you have complete control over, things you have partial control over, and the things have no control over. The practice is to focus life’s energy on the things we have total or partial control over and ignore areas we have no control over. The book is called A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William Irvine. I wrote more about Stoic techniques here:

    http://goboxstorage.ca/blog/emergency-preparation-survivor-mentality/

    #31561
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    My diversions are books (of which I have enough to stock a small town’s library), genealogical research (which won’t be possible post-SHTF if the grid is down), and just going for a walk up my road (very quiet dirt road through the woods and with majestic views in the clearings) or just wandering around my property looking at what is growing. My wife has quite a few movies too which give a couple hours respite from the world, but that’s only good for so long as the grid is up. I used to do a lot of bike riding (hence the moniker MountainBiker), but age in combination with steep/rough conditions around here has put a damper on that. Can’t do the kind of riding anymore that I did for decades.

    #31563
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    For my wife and I it’s reading and talking. As a psychotherapist, her days are long and filled with helping people to cope and deal with life’s struggles. When she comes home, we talk and talk some more. We discuss current events, the kids and grandkids, what went on in my day. Anything to step away from her workday.

    I learned during my time in the service, that when I face a stressful situation, I get very quiet and still. It’s only afterwards that the shaking and tremors start. Fortunately for me, once I get past that, I am usually in good shape, with a healthy perspective of what I experienced.

    Tukie2: You have my deepest sympathy. The battle your husband fought was a battle that was more painful than any physical pain.

    #31564
    Profile photo of tukie2
    tukie2
    Survivalist
    member3

    Thank you all. My husband’s battle with PTSD, was no harder that most of what you guys go through or have gone through as well…it sucked big time to put it bluntly…and it does affect all family members. My boys still have scars from going through it although most people wouldn’t see it. It is part of life when you love a military person, you accept it all …the good and the bad. It is the reason I became a nurse actually, and his legacy reflects those who I have helped over the last 10 years.

    #31567
    Profile photo of Ron S
    Ron S
    Survivalist
    member6

    I read to get away. When our house burned about 9 years ago, I calculated that Ilost over 2,000 books, some that can never be replaced. When I need a temporary respite, I have a scene that I retreat to. In my time in the military, I worked on a Radar site that was off base on a country road. It had snowed about 4 inches the night before, but without any wind. As I proceeded up the road, I was the second one as there was a solitary set of tracks which were very crisp. The rising sun cast a shadow in the track, and nothing else was moving. I go there in my mind’s eye to get away and most times, after a few minutes, I have visualized an answer. This will not work in an immediate threat situation but it has helped me get through many stressful situations over the last 50+ years. Ron S

    #31568
    Profile photo of tukie2
    tukie2
    Survivalist
    member3

    Beautiful visualization Ron S. What a great idea.

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