Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #16636
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Welcome! Please introduce yourself?

    I’m a retired guy in my early 60’s living in Vermont.

    Since when are you into survival and preparedness and what made you get into it?

    I have been prepping in large and small ways for the past 7 or 8 years, though I have always had somewhat of a prepper mindset even before I ever heard the word or knew why I should prep. What triggered me to more formally start down this path was becoming aware of the H5N1 pandemic flu threat and realizing the implications of a major pandemic.

    Why is survival and preparedness important or interesting for you? What scenario are you preparing for?

    I’m a logical thinker who quickly connects the dots and know that anything more than a regional disaster means we’re all on our own, and maybe even with a regional disaster too if we think back to the bungled response to Katrina. Though a pandemic threat may have started me down this road, the threat that guides all of my prepping decisions is a major long term grid down scenario.

    How would you describe your prepping / survival philosophy? What matters for you?

    My philosophy is that the better I’m prepared the better I can be part of the solution come TEOTWAWKI. What matters to me is doing what I can to better assure my kids and grandkids have a future.

    Do you have some favorite quotes or words of wisdom you like?

    No,no favorites. I’ve seen many quotes that I thought were perfect for whatever their reference point was but nothing that covers all bases.

    You are dying and have 30 seconds left, what do you do or say?

    Just that I love you to my family, and to remember their heritage.

    #16653
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Welcome to the community Mountainbiker!

    #16657
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    Welcome to the forum!

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #16661
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Welcome

    #16693
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Welcome to the forum MountainBiker! I already read your post in which you detail your BOL setup and yeah, you are definitely a logical thinker. Great to have you here!

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #16742
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Welcome to the forum!

    #16769
    Profile photo of Gentolman
    Gentolman
    Survivalist
    member2

    I am not a mountain biker and need to learn more. Walmart has a folding mountain bike for about $250. I thought it might be a decent insurance policy to keep in the back of each of our vehicles as a get home tool. It could cut the time in half in getting home. I do understand that in order to do this effectively I would have to put in some training. Here in WV mountain biking takes on a whole new meaning because even if you stay on the roads there are some steep hills to get over. And I also understand that traveling by bike with a back pack on would take some practice. Thanks for any help or comments that I may receive.

    #16775
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Gentolman, I have a couple mountain bikes, one expensive and the other more moderately priced. The better one doesn’t get used during snow season so as to avoid road salt. I also have a moderately priced road bike that I haven’t used in years. If I were to buy a new bike I would buy one of those newer recreational bikes, the kinds that don’t shift gears or have fancy braking systems. Basically the kinds of bikes most kids used in the 50’s & 60’s before the 3 speeds came out (now 27 speeds…). My reasoning is that a simple old fashioned bike is easily maintained. Bend or break a derailleur and you’re walking home and the bike is going into the shop for an expensive repair. Have a problem with disc brakes and the bike is going into the shop. When I was a kid I could fix my own bike, No way could I do it now. Sort of like cars which in the modern world are very difficult for an average person to do much of any repairs on.

    All that said, if all you want is an emergency tool so to speak to get home with, then yes a folding bike that you can keep in your vehicle would do the trick. It is actually a very good idea. Like with everything else you get what you pay for and $250 is not going to get you a quality bike. That doesn’t much matter though if it’s just an insurance policy to get you home someday. If you haven’t been biking, you really need to do some practice runs. It might not be pretty at first but better to get accustomed to riding now than do it for the first time in a real emergency. If early on you have to walk the bike up hills, so be it. You’ll get there. Weight is always an issue for bikes (and the less expensive bikes tend to be heavier) and carrying a backpack adds to your effort. My backpack has good shoulder pads and seems to distribute the weight well which in turn seems to make it less of a burden for me. Like WV, there isn’t much in the way of flat terrain up here either!

    One of the most important things I learned over the years is unless the bike fits you well, it’ll take more effort on your part to ride it and/or it’ll be less comfortable. If it is possible to try on a bike before you buy it, do so. You can likely do that a bike shop so as to see firsthand what is comfortable to not before you go to Walmart. It’ll help you differentiate what you’re buying.

    Good luck.

    #16850
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Gentolman, one more thing. Pay attention to the tires on anything you buy. If you are going to be on pavement, the fatter and nobbier the tires are the harder you will work pedaling. The flip side is the really skinny tires that you see on some road bikes are susceptible to pinch flats when you hit a pothole or some such. So not too fat or nobby, and not skinny skinny either. The mountain bike type tires are better suited for off-road riding, going over rocks, roots and technical off-road riding.

    #16935
    Profile photo of WhiteKnight
    WhiteKnight
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Welcome Mountainbiker! I myself have a Trek 820, and it was worth every penny. I love it, and it has taken some abuse. Not even so much as a flat yet!

    #16936
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Welcome MountainBiker

    #16937
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Welcome, pull up a chair and stay a while.

    #16950
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks for the welcomes everyone. I’m in kind of traveling on and off mode these next few weeks so I might not jump into conversations as much as I might want but if first impressions matter, mine has been very positive. Lots of good points made in the threads I’ve read, and good topics overall.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.