Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #67981
    Profile photo of Mike
    Mike
    Survivalist

    Welcome! Please introduce yourself? (Name, age, gender, location for example)

    Hello everyone, I’m Mike from Los Angeles, CA

    Since when are you into survival and preparedness and what made you get into it?

    Ever since learning about self-improvement, self-awareness, and knowing about human nature, it got me very interested about survival.

    Why is survival and preparedness important or interesting for you? What scenario are you preparing for?

    Because I’ve finally awakened myself on how the world really is. I learned that even right now in our civilized world, there are people that are evil in their hearts and they just wait for a chance to take advantage of others. I learned to be prepared and confident to say “Never Again” to anything that will come and do harm to me. I’m preparing for earthquakes and possible civil unrest as that is much more likely to happen near my area.

    How would you describe your prepping / survival philosophy? What matters for you?

    I learned to be realistic. I learned in order to truly survive in this world, I need to grow my knowledge, skills, and experience. I learned that I need to build connections of people who have survival/prepper mindsets so that we can have a longer, fighting chance to live in this world. I learned that survival has many moving parts and that I need to always stay on top of things and for my mindset to be on point at all times.

    Do you have some favorite quotes or words of wisdom you like?

    “There are no such thing as permanent friends. Only permanent interests.”

    You are dying and have 30 seconds left, what do you do or say?

    “God, please forgive me for everything that I’ve done wrong in this world. Please take care of my loved ones.”

    #68059
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Welcome Mike. If you look in the archives you might find some good prep discussions that interest you.

    #68112
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    Welcome to the school community, Mike! As a native of Shaky-quaky Southern California, I discovered the need for preps. And as a current dweller in (and future escapee from) San Francisco, I suggest that one prep which you might want to seriously consider, is to “G.O.O.D.”, or at least, to live as far in a favorable direction from “Dodge.” as feasible.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #68268
    Profile photo of Mike
    Mike
    Survivalist

    Welcome to the school community, Mike! As a native of Shaky-quaky Southern California, I discovered the need for preps. And as a current dweller in (and future escapee from) San Francisco, I suggest that one prep which you might want to seriously consider, is to “G.O.O.D.”, or at least, to live as far in a favorable direction from “Dodge.” as feasible.

    Yes exactly, I believe when living in California, especially in urban places, the first problems we’re gonna be dealing with after an earthquake, are injuries, deaths and breakdown of infrastructure. There can still be a few services active but it’s gonna be very hard for help to reach your turn

    So no services, cars and buildings broke down, plus people panicking and maybe looting supplies. Worse case, shootings happening later if there’s widespread hunger. That’s the most SHTF that I can see in the first few days. I know it will get worse as time goes by, and it’s gonna be very tough to recover.

    Can you explain me what does “G.O.O.D” mean?

    #68269
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Mike, G.O.O.D.”Get Out Of Dodge” as in how you will get yourself home or to a safe place when it hits the fan or to get yourself situated somewhere safe in anticipation of things falling apart in the future. For example, I purposely relocated to a far more sustainable and safe place vs where I had been living. In choosing my specific home I had criteria that made sense to preppers, but that others couldn’t see, to the point that some of our non-prepper friends didn’t understand the choice I made.

    #68340
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Welcome Mike!

    #68446
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Welcome again.

    We visited LA about a year and a half ago.
    I can see some advantages to being there, versus the sticks depending on what catastrophe occurs. Especially if you are set up to ride out the initial 3-6 months.

    Good luck, hope to hear from you often.

    #68585
    Profile photo of Mike
    Mike
    Survivalist

    Hey Selco, it’s amazing being in this forum

    @Whirlibird , what places did you visit? I haven’t been much areas up north but mostly LA

    What do you think is good about LA or California in general?

    #68621
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Hey Selco, it’s amazing being in this form

    @Whirlibird , what places did you visit? I haven’t been much areas up north but mostly LA

    What do you think is good about LA or California in general?

    Opportunity.
    Ignoring the asinine laws and politics there, there are advantages.
    The ability to have a different job before the ink is dry on your paperwork.
    The opportunity to be anonymous, its nice to be able to blend into the woodwork as it were. Small towns this doesn’t happen.
    The opportunity to hit the beach/ocean and put some fish back.
    The weather. We had 60’s yesterday but blowing snow on Thursday.
    The opportunity to grow stuff year round without a greenhouse.

    Depending on the SHTF situation, you have the opportunity to glean and scrounge from nearly endless sources.
    And .gov ‘help’, who do you think will get more attention and assistance, LA or Kemmerer WY in a disaster?

    We all know the negatives but how many really look at the positives? It all depends on what happens.

    We did the tourist thing, the mouse, museums,
    ended up spending more time around Dana Point, being small town types the sheer quantity of people and traffic were making the wife and kids unhappy eventually.

    It all depends on your mindset and what happens.

    By the way, while I enjoy visiting big cities for the short term, I’ll stick with my smaller towns for living.

    #68623
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    First, welcome Mike. Glad to see you here. Yes – Selco has done a wonderful thing here, helping people for the sake of helping people – an increasingly rare breed of people. And it brings out the best in like-minded people. There are some really decent people here, and as you explore the older posts – especially the ones in the prepping threads, you’ll find a wealth of education that would be cost-prohibitive for many people if they purchased a library of books on various topics from growing, surviving, protecting, you name it. Plus, some of the things that Selco has shared would be hard to find anywhere else (don’t neglect his blog). Enjoy and appreciate.

    Having lived there for nearly 8 years (worked in Orange County, lived in San Bernardino area), I found that living where I could see the “air” and watch a perfectly solid concrete sidewalk move up and down in waves, was not a place I felt inherently comfortable. Not wanting to stay and play the odds, we moved back “home.” We can have an occasional major hurricane, but at least by the time it gets here the winds would almost always be under 100mph even in a worst case situation. Tornadoes? They happen all the time – but at best are generally only a couple hundred yards or so wide, and less than a mile long. That leaves a massive amount of land never touched. We’ve even had two go over the house but not touch down (heard one of those, but just watched the other on radar). We accept that for also giving us a growing season that includes about 2/3 of the year even without a greenhouse. And with a rainwater collection and Berkey Filter system, we’ll virtually always have sufficient water for not only survival, but also keeping the gardens going. And we won’t freeze to death here. Finally, prior to a SHTF situation, we’ve got virtually any kind of shopping or medical resource we could need within short drives. (Plus,the 2nd Amendment is alive and fairly well in this area – we don’t need no sanctuary cities for guns. ;-) )

    As for Whirlibird’s statement:

    Depending on the SHTF situation . .

    When the major earthquake scenario finally becomes a serioius SHTF situation, I frankly wouldn’t want to be anywhere near the area. Scrounging for resources could easily get you killed in the granola capitol of the world (land of fruits, nuts, and flakes). I don’t believe there is an ideal location – we just seek the area that seems to pose the best odds for survival with the least risks for our own personal and family situation, in what will still ultimately turn out to be something much less than 100% predictable. Thus, Selco’s gift to those that have eyes to see, ears to hear, and brains to comprehend.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #68624
    Profile photo of Mike
    Mike
    Survivalist

    Hey Selco, it’s amazing being in this form

    @Whirlibird , what places did you visit? I haven’t been much areas up north but mostly LA

    What do you think is good about LA or California in general?

    Opportunity.
    Ignoring the asinine laws and politics there, there are advantages.
    The ability to have a different job before the ink is dry on your paperwork.
    The opportunity to be anonymous, its nice to be able to blend into the woodwork as it were. Small towns this doesn’t happen.
    The opportunity to hit the beach/ocean and put some fish back.
    The weather. We had 60’s yesterday but blowing snow on Thursday.
    The opportunity to grow stuff year round without a greenhouse.

    Depending on the SHTF situation, you have the opportunity to glean and scrounge from nearly endless sources.
    And .gov ‘help’, who do you think will get more attention and assistance, LA or Kemmerer WY in a disaster?

    We all know the negatives but how many really look at the positives? It all depends on what happens.

    We did the tourist thing, the mouse, museums,
    ended up spending more time around Dana Point, being small town types the sheer quantity of people and traffic were making the wife and kids unhappy eventually.

    It all depends on your mindset and what happens.

    By the way, while I enjoy visiting big cities for the short term, I’ll stick with my smaller towns for living.

    @Whirlibird That’s interesting. I’ve always thought rural has a lot of advantages (which I’m sure they do), and looks like I need to fully thoroughly research All Pros/Cons of living in pre/post shtf in urban vs rural

    For some reason, my mindset has just completely changed from working normal city jobs to now having the desire to move out and living rural. The city life isn’t really all that. Looks like I’m just an old timer. I guess the more you get older, the more you just wanna get out as far as possible from all the craziness lol

    @GeorgiaSaint yes I agree, but what I’ve noticed when it comes to earthquakes (On the videos that I’ve watched), I saw that most people were actually helping each other out. Getting others out in the rubble, providing medical assistance and transportation, and giving relief to other people.
    On a worse case earthquake SHTF, I believe urban people would mostly hunker down, because roads and freeways would be closed out, and they’ll just defend themselves in their homes with what they got. And then Urban survival mode comes in.
    The people who would decide to bug out, would either have to walk on foot or drive in some off-road way of transportation, in getting to their BOL. Coastal people would go on their boats and ferry away from the US.. but at the risk of possible tsunamis and US Coast Guard

    “I don’t believe there is an ideal location – we just seek the area that seems to pose the best odds for survival with the least risks for our own personal and family situation” I agree with this also

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