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  • #5843
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    I have been looking for an easy way to save dry goods like rice and flour for a while. I buy a little just about every time I go to the grocery store and have been looking for an cost effective way add them to my long term food storage. During my research I learned about oven canning and thought it might by a great solution for me.

    Unlike many people who store food I do not buy in bulk; for two reasons. The first being that I do not have any stores nearby that sell bulk dry goods and the other is I don’t have the extra money to buy 100 pounds of rice and then all the Mylar bags, oxygen absorbers and food grade buckets. What I do have is a few extra dollars every week and lots of jars.. So I can buy a few 3 pound bags of rice at the end of the week, oven can it and I am done.

    The other great thing about oven canning is that if you can your dry goods correctly they can have a storage life of 15 to 20 years. So if you are at the grocery store and find flour or sale and decide to pick up a few extra bags you will know that you can store it long term and you will not have lost any money. The other great thing is that the jars are a good size so you can rotate the dry goods easily. We use ½ gallon jars for our oven canning. When needed I’ll just open one up and keep it in the pantry. When that jars is empty, wash it and put it back in the box with the other empties and gets another full jar out of storage. We have found that the half gallon Ball jars hold about 3 ½ pounds of rice and 2 ½ pounds of flour. Any size jar will work from pints to half gallons.

    What can be oven canned?

    Dried goods like oatmeal, rice, whole wheat flour, white flour, cake mixes, and potato flakes can all be oven canned. Sugar and products that contain oil cannot be oven canned.

    How to oven can Dry Goods

    The first thing you need to do is pre-heat your oven to 200 degrees (depending on the size of jar you are using you might have to remove the top rack in your oven). While your oven is heating up make sure that you have the correct size lids and bands to fit the jars. Fill your clean jars with the dry goods you are canning. Once the oven has pre-heated place your full jars (no lids) on a cookie sheet in the oven. We always place the cookie sheet in the oven first and then place the jars on the cookie sheet. The cookie sheets job is to keep the jars from tipping over in the oven.

    Leave the filled jars in the oven for one hour. While they are processing get a clean towel and place it on your counter so the hot jars want damage it when you remove them from the oven. Once the jars have processed for an hours use hot mitts to remove a jar and place it on the towel. Carefully wipe the rim with a damp (not wet) paper towel. Lastly place the lid on the hot jar and screw the band firmly in place. Carefully grab another jar and repeat this process until all the jars have lids and bands firmly secured. As the jars cool you will hear them start to make a “clicking” noise. That is the sound of the lids sealing. Let the jars cool completely, remove bands, label and store.

    The Advantages

    Oven canning is an excellent way to prolong the shelf life of dry goods. It also kills bugs and eggs that you might not know are in your products. The big one for me was that if frees up valuable freezer space and helps me take advantage of sales at my local grocery store.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #5844
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Just to add this also works with pickle jars, pasta sauce jars baby food jars.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #5846
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Nice! I hadn’t heard about this, but I like the idea and I am definitely trying it – thank you for the great tips!

    Two years ago, I found a recipe online for oven-canning your own fruit bread (you bake it in the jar and it self-seals). I had some hesitation about it, but my mother told me to stop being such a pansy and just try it.

    I am so glad I did! The bread lasted a year on my shelves (I made 8 pint jars from one recipe) and was so easy to just pop open and enjoy about once a month when I got the hankering for fruit bread. I made peach. Here’s the original post (below).

    http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/bread-in-a-jar.htm

    I know a lot of sites say that only USDA-approved recipes on canning should be used, and I agree it can get dicey if you are not familiar with canning or aren’t into sterilizing your stuff, but my own experience was that I didn’t die, and was very happy eating hassle-free peach bread for a year. :)

    #10919
    stranger
    stranger
    Survivalist
    member1

    will try this wonder if it is a vacum seal when lids pop that must be what happens

    #10921
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    As long as you get the lids on while the jars are still hot, yes they pop and suck in.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #10932
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Thanks for the post Gypsy. I have to remember to get back to doing this especially when Is see a good sale!

    #32982
    Profile photo of dogcop
    dogcop
    Survivalist
    member1

    have used my foodsaver with lid attatchment for a while but like the idea of heating the flour first to kill any hitch hikers thanks for the idea! wonder if this would also work with dehydrated veggies for longer term storage?

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