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  • #44296
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Several comments, particularly regarding GS posts.

    Considering the way the USA’s heath care system is based upon the pill and removal ideology, the support for medications such as SSRI’s defies common sense. Forget the statistics, long paragraphs in support of, and kick backs to providers for prescribing this crap. Let’s just think about reality:

    * SSRI’s are known to cause psychosis in people that don’t truly have a “need” for them.
    * Western medicine is based upon “practicing” medicine within a set standard of care. This standard of care allows for trial and error until finding a workable plan for the perceived diagnosis.
    * The amount of “depressed” or “anxious” people in the USA have increased dramatically over the last few decades in a disproportionate ratio than other countries with similar Western medical practices. The statistics will lie, but think of all the women that need anti-anxiety medications for their periods or people quitting smoking or even people in the process of life changes like moving/buying house/going to college/etc…. Why? Because everyone must be warm and fuzzy with a big chemical hug if they feel down.
    * Schools HAVE and DO require certain students that they deem “unruly” to be placed under medical care (read as medicated) so that they are no longer “unruly.” Personal experience with my son growing up and stories from other parents over several school districts and states…. Not a large, scientific sampling, but there are enough anecdotal accounts of others to support this statement and generalization.
    * SSRI treatment itself is based upon “pill roulette” until something seems to “work” and then they keep changing medications on a semi regular basis because of the body’s constant change. I have worked with enough Special Olympic kids to know that these medications and constant medication changes just mess them up more. When these kids quit taking their medications they are USUALLY higher functioning, depending on what their initial issue was. They keep getting their medications swapped so many times to see if “something works better.” It’s a complete shotgun treatment to see what hits. The worst part is that anyone I have worked with on these type medications seems to depend on them to the point where their life revolves around creating drama to get their meds changed. This is very generalized and I am sure that the 5% of the population that actually needs to be medicated does benefit…. Some…..

    SSRI’s are dangerous. The package insert says so. Why does someone need an SSRI because they are a bit cranky? Because the patient is a little b*tch, the provider doesn’t care about treating patients anymore due to overburden of regulation/requirements, and the insurance company dictates what can or cannot be done (including reimbursement). If you want to argue, go pack sand. I have an MBA in Hospital Administration, been in direct patient care for over 14 years before I went admin, and still deal with all aspects of how our medical system works. Even numerous CEO’s of health insurance companies that I have had to sit in on their lectures agree with me, but I stated it MUCH more blunt and confrontational.

    The problem we have is that the FDA and AMA work together to make different things a “medical condition” so that treatments can be regulated. Obesity is a medical condition? No, it is a “people are allowed to blame everyone else for their own problems” condition. Why do taxpayers have to waste money on research for obesity? Just make it so people can grown frigging gardens in their backyards again so they get something other than GMOs or “organic” food grown in 3rd world countries being fertilized with human waste.

    Get rid of the government oversight on all aspects of our life, hold people accountable, give them a chance after they serve their ENTIRE sentence, remove all criminal immigrants (all those in country illegally), and cut taxes where people can afford to work less/live more. Problems will sort themselves out over time one way or another…. At least I will be left the hell alone.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    • This reply was modified 6 years ago by Profile photo of sledjockey sledjockey.
    • This reply was modified 6 years ago by Profile photo of sledjockey sledjockey.
    • This reply was modified 6 years ago by Profile photo of sledjockey sledjockey.
    #44300
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Several comments, particularly regarding GS posts.

    I’m not sure which way that was meant. So, just in case there was something in your post that was intended as opposition to anything I wrote, I want to say here and now, with no significant exception, that would have been because of a lack of clarity on my part as I focused on just one small part of the issue here or there, or a misunderstanding on your part of something I intended. We’re very much in the same ballpark, from what I just read.

    With that said, there is very little (and nothing of any great significance) with which I would take issue in sledjockey’s post. On target, point after point. And it points out an issue that goes beyond just mental health treatment. Doctors schedules simply do not allow for personalized medical care any more. They are required to see patients back-to-back-to-back-to-back-to … just to make ends meet, as they pay rent, pay for a practice manager, pay for insurance specialists (NOT just people that do accounting), pay malpractice insurance, pay for nursing staff, equipment, supplies, etc., out of the ever-dwindling amounts allowed by insurance companies. Medicine is not personal any more. Everything has to be justified to an insurance company or Medicare – THEY (and even ultimately FedGov) are the ultimate arbiters of care in the US, not the physicians, down to the specific procedure used, the medication prescribed, or the length of hospital stay (if there even is one allowed). I could go on – but won’t (it would be long, and a rant).

    Excellent post, sledjockey.

    #44305
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    sledjockey & GS, I agree that people get over-medicated, I think in part because there is money to be made in the prescriptions and in all of the follow-up appointments to see how the meds are working. Going astray a bit from the SSRI’s discussion, whereas doctors are under pressure to churn through as many patients as they can given lower margins per patients, my observation is that hospitals have bought up so many medical practices that then have an incentive to over-order tests and treatments. 10 years ago my primary care physician found microscopic blood in a urine sample taken as part of an annual physical. He ordered an ultrasound which found the bladder tumors and a couple weeks later I had surgery. Last week microscopic blood was found in a urine sample my wife gave. Rather than a relatively inexpensive ultrasound what her doctor (part of the hospital network) ordered was a CT Scan with contrast dye and also a cystoscopy. Same issue (blood in urine), same suspected problem (bladder cancer), but far more expensive diagnosis that just 10 years ago. You don’t want to get me going about how the bills get churned with unnecessary tests and treatments for Medicare patients. We had a front ring seat with my in-laws in their final years.

    #44308
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    I have been using the North Texas VA Health Care system since 2003. I am a positive endorser of the VA in North Texas (Dallas to the Red River on the North and to almost the Texas East state line.
    Year after year I read and see many entries about VA health care in other states (also in other parts of Texas.) I thank God for the system I use.
    I have 2 semi-annual checkups a year. I call a month in advance and get, most of the time, the days and times I desire. During my appointment days there is little time to fool around as after my lab appointments within a hour and a half it is time to see the doctor.
    Pills: One of my VA health providers was dead serious about giving a pill for every concern I voiced. The current doctor is totally opposite.
    Why do I mention the above? To me health care is getting usurped more and more every day. Using the VA system there are certain guidelines employed. This may mean you have to get a CAT scan before seeing a specialist which in turn makes waiting for help a tad long. In the Medicare world, I qualified early due to disability. I have used Medicare on certain occasions and find it just a tad messed up. There again there are few GP doctors in this county that will take Medicare patients.
    The wife of a doctor friend of mine was also a MD. She stopped as soon as she paid off all her loans. She made the point that: Having two doctors in the family messed up their home time too much. The cost of running two practices was not worth the return.
    Robin

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