Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #4956
    Shupak
    Shupak
    Veteran
    member1

    Shupak from NYC, here. I’ve been living in NYC for half a decade. I’m former-military and I’ve been training in martial arts since I was a preteen. I’ve deployed with the military to a number of places overseas that, you could say, had seen better days.

    Anyone who was in lower Manhattan or parts of Brooklyn when Sandy hit can attest that even a relatively minor event like that can lead to a pretty high degree of hardship for the unprepared.

    I’m generally a private person–I don’t post photos of the minutia of my day all over the internet, I don’t update my network of friends every time I purchase a new item of clothing, you won’t see my “zombie apocalypse ensemble” posted on Pinterest.

    On the other hand, I’m looking for fellow preppers in the NYC area who possess, you know, certain important traits: sanity, a desire to live, the desire to prepare yourself, the ability to refrain from vomiting information to anyone who will listen (OpSec), preferably a skill set that would add to a group’s survival probability.

    “You know how the first generation are warriors, and then the second generation become farmers, and then the third generation become inventors and creators, and then by the fifth generation they’r

    #5028
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Welcome Shupak, you sound like prepared man.

    #5033
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    Shupak,
    Welcome!
    You definitely sound on-point.
    Hopefully you’ll be able to build a team in your area. I am trying to do the same in my area.
    Good luck!
    Hannah

    #5047
    Profile photo of camouflage762
    camouflage762
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Hey Shupac.

    Good luck in making contact with like minded preppers. Surviving in a high rise building (That’s my experience of a city ) sound very interesting.

    Be interested to hear of your plans.

    Good luck.

    #5081
    Shupak
    Shupak
    Veteran
    member1

    Thank you all for generously welcoming me to the forum.

    I want to say, Selco, I truly have enjoyed reading your posts for a while, now. Two of my deployments with the military were to the Balkan Peninsula–I spent a little over two years, there, if you combine the time spent on both those deployments. And it is, I believe, impossible to describe to someone who hasn’t been there just how beautiful the countryside is in that region of the world. The people, too, are wonderful in my experience. And I really miss the food–our food in the States is way too processed by comparison, even when it is labeled “organic.”

    I guess one of the things that hits home for me with your posts is that it reminds me so much of the difference that exists between a deployed member of a military force versus a civilian in the same area when things get bad. The military has its bases, command centers or outposts, FOB’s, etcetera, along with a full-spectrum of support mechanisms in place depending on circumstances (armor, gas masks, a lot of fire power, air support, supplies and so on), but as a civilian within a community, one is left mostly to their own devices without comparatively any protective blanket of security.

    I’d been in the military for a while, so when I finally did go civilian, I sort of felt naked, for lack of a better term. No more issued gear I could grab and go, no more fresh set of boots whenever I needed them, no pilfered boxes of MRE’s to stick in the closet, no more membership to the “big green gun club,” as it’s sometimes called. It didn’t take me long to figure out that I needed to start prepping myself, not even in response to any specific circumstance, but just to make that sense of feeling utterly vulnerable go-away.

    In Manhattan, someone who can boil their own water is practically a homesteader compared to your average joe citizen, here–That may be an exaggeration, but sadly not by much. Many, many people, here, religiously eat take-out and grab a bottle of water as needed from the corner store while their shelves remain mostly empty.

    As I alluded to in my original post, when Sandy did hit New York, everything south of 14th Street in Manhattan along with the parts of Brooklyn along the East River went dark and were largely flooded–I know some people who saw ten feet of standing water in their buildings, the Holland Tunnel got flooded out, cars were floating down the streets. That isn’t really a huge deal in the scheme of things (Sandy cost a great deal in terms of damage to homes and infrastructure, but it was no Katrina and it certainly wasn’t a worst case scenario), but to think something as minor as that could effectively shut down ALL supply lines into the city for close to a month should be a wake up call to anyone paying attention.

    Looking at a map of the city, the only viable option for leaving outright for the mainland U.S. is the George Washington Bridge all the way up on 179th Street (around a 15 mile hike for anyone in lower Manhattan who tries to leave on foot), which is the only above ground mainland facing exit point for Manhattan. Trying to hump out through the tunnels (the only other westward option) while every car in Manhattan is trying to get out seems like it would be almost a comically bad idea.

    Otherwise someone’s only options are: head to Long Island via the Brooklyn Bridge, Manhattan Bridge, etcetera; swim or paddle across the Hudson River, catch the last ferry out, or hunker down and hope for the best.

    I don’t think anything I’ve said up to this point is particularly groundbreaking news to anyone in the 5 boroughs who’s looked at a map, but I also believe most people haven’t put much thought into how exactly they would leave the city in a hurry.

    Personally, if I could realistically leave the city, right now, and go live somewhere substantially more remote, I’d do it in a heartbeat, but economic considerations and she who wears the pants have determined that, for now, the city will continue to be a monkey on my back.

    I also wanted to say, too, I think it’s great that preppers (I feel like there must be a better word for us, but preparers seems unwieldy and it’s the best I could come up with on the fly) from all-around can come here and mingle, exchange ideas and see we’re not alone.

    So, with that, I’ll stop my ramblings and say, again, it’s great to be here. Thank you.

    “You know how the first generation are warriors, and then the second generation become farmers, and then the third generation become inventors and creators, and then by the fifth generation they’r

    #39775
    Profile photo of vim6
    vim6
    Survivalist
    member1

    I saw this topic is about a year old, hopefully this can open up again with more discussions.
    This is my first post, I would like to thank Selco on sharing valuable information on urban survival. This course and the other course has truly opened my mind up to things that I completely did not know which has lead me to develop skills.

    Like Shupak, I am from NYC, also looking for survivalists and preppers. Shunpak hit the nail on the head on summarizing what happened during Sandy also describing the people. Many NYC residents were asleep( meaning to busy with other bullshit going on) when Sandy hit. Many thought that this was not going to be serious to the point that lights will be out for days in some areas also food and water will be an issue. I have seen people make some poor choices and didn’t have any concept of survivalist skills in their tool box. During and after Sandy this really opened my eyes of how stupid many NYC residents are taking almost everything for granted to the point that they didn’t know how to function.

    Selco wrote a lot of valuable information about psychology which I seen some situations unfold during Sandy. Now that I reflect on my actions I can see Selco and a few others shaking their heads on the choices that I made during Sandy which I will explain. I have seen a small SHTF scenarios when I walked into a hospital in Manhattan seeing people panic during a natural disaster also to help two people in the building by providing food and water since it was unavailable. I will say this, being in a hospital is one of the last places you want to be when SHTF because a lot things most certainly can go wrong in a building. The other locations I went to were bad areas in Manhattan to check up on people to see if they were alright. I did see small looting for example some cars were broken into. The reason why I went out into the public in a natural disaster was obvious to see if people that I knew were alright also to get a better sense of small SHTF scenarios in different areas of Manhattan. After witnessing different small SHTF scenarios I have gain a lot of knowledge first hand about psychology which will go into my tool box of skill sets. With this course I have a better understanding of past experience of which I can develop new skill sets for the future.

    Thanks everyone for reading my first post.

    #39788
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Welcome Vim6, pull up a chair and stay a while,

    You might do your own introduction, let the general population here know of you.

    #39790
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Welcome to the forum vim6.

    #39791
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Damn ! a prepper in NYC ? thats almost like being a Jew in Nazi Germany lol .

    #39793
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Come on Tolik, I’ll bet there are lots of prepared people in NYC.q

    #39794
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    Welcome to the forum, Shupak and Vim6, from the belly of a smaller beast, San Francisco. A city provides a lot of opportunity to study herds of sheeple up close and personal — which is why we’re on our way out of town. Don’t want to be here when the Schumer hits the fan!

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #39795
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    NYC would be a paticularly bad place to be with such limited access/egress routes. The GWB is jammed everyday.

    #39798
    Profile photo of vim6
    vim6
    Survivalist
    member1

    thanks everyone,

    74, Many sheeple are attach to their iphone, tv or night life and don’t realize anything around them. It is scary how many NYC people depend on the system since they want everything now, now, right now. L Tecolote, you probably came across this in San Francisco. Once you are out of NYC and some where in NY state then the people completely change with attitude towards survivalist/preppers. Access is very limited, Shupak was right when he mention the map of NYC. However; around the George Washington Bridge are crappy neighborhoods and that is asking for trouble in a SHTF scenarios. Since the Bronx is by the George Washington Bridge the locals wouldn’t run into that much traffic going to that route. Manhattan is close to the Bronx so the locals will have somewhat are of a hard time depending when they plan for the great escape. However; Brooklyn and Queens are **** of out luck, the locals will run into traffic no matter which corner they turn into. Staten Island, is close to New Jersey so they can cut through New Jersey and come right back into New York and be out of the way of the whole mess.

    #39799
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Welcome Vim6, and hi to you too Shupak. 74 is right about NYC. It is in a class of its own.

    Shupak, it is a year later since your posts above. Have you developed a plan that you are satisfied with? Getting into and out of NYC in a car under normal conditions isn’t easy. Trains likely wouldn’t be running under many scenarios. The elites will exit Manhattan the way they do now, via helicopter. I think the best option for most folks is to exit via whatever transport options they have very early in a developing crisis. Better to call in sick or take an impromptu vacation day just in case than to wait until you know for sure the S is HTF. Easier said than done I know. but living on Manhattan isn’t a very forgiving set of circumstances in this context, even if sheltering in place.

    I assume that career considerations is why you are on Manhattan. Is it an option to cross the river so as to live in NJ and take the train in every day? At least you wouldn’t be in NYC on your off hours and you would have land routes to points west. I understand places with easy access to Manhattan like Jersey City, Union City etc have become rather trendy.

    Good luck.

    #39800
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Vim6,
    The walking dead are virtually everywhere. I just figure that out of 10 million residents in NYC you can’t be the only prepper.

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