Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #2238
    ArcticSteve
    ArcticSteve
    Survivalist
    member1

    Water is taken for granted in America… It is the most valuable resource on this planet earth. Clean, fresh water is becoming more of a challenge each year. When times are not “normal”, how will you adapt and improvise to obtain that giver of life…… WATER ?? What are your plans? What have you done? What have you done that didn’t work out the way you planned?

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    #2242
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I think the water problem will hit so hard once the time has come. Right now almost nobody can imagine not having water.

    I read studies about climate change and how it will affect the area I’m relocating to right now. We had a well drilled that provides water all year around but will also use rainwater collection to store more for the dry periods of the year.

    I also look into getting a bug out location close to the homestead we are building now. We are already away from everything at our homestead but when times get really tough I want to have another fallback right next to some mountains nearby. I plan to build a pretty big underground water storage over there.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #2264
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    I thoroughly agree that consideration about a long term water supply is essential. Too many assume that town water will continue to be available, even in a crisis. There are just too many past examples to show that this idea shouldn’t relied upon.

    Many water supplies depend upon electric pumps to keep the flow going, which make them vulnerable. Questions that can be considered would be: Are there standby generators to keep the flow happening? Is there fuel for the generators, and if so, how much? Do the managing authorities assume that any emergency will be over in a few days? Have they even thought about this at all?

    Many authorities don’t think much about emergencies and contingencies, and in so far as they do they tend to assume any disasters will be local and temporary, and so under-fund emergency services and infrastructure. This, in fact, is why we prep; because we can’t rely on the government to save our chestnuts out of the fire when a crisis comes along.

    I like to give myself as many options as possible when I think about prepping, so some things worth considering are (as has already been said) finding a location that is near a reliable water supply, stocking up on purchased water, having rain catchment storage, underground bore water, devices for extracting water from the air. There is plenty of info about these found on the web or youtube. Think about short term and long term possibilities. Filling the bath tub might be okay for a few days, but having some long term options is good if one can do it.

    Of course not everyone can take advantage of all possibilities; for instance, a poor person can’t afford to buy some land near a water supply. But the important thing (though I’m sure people here already know this) is to not assume that water will always be available and to prepare in whatever ways we can.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #2291
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    People usually do not pay too much attention to water until it becomes hard to get, then you see true value of it.
    One of the most important things in choosing my BOL is water availability. Springs and creeks close to it make it perfect for being there when SHTF.

    #2292
    ArcticSteve
    ArcticSteve
    Survivalist
    member1

    All good points. Maybe Selco will post the PDF of the water basics course workbook I sent to him for you all to access. Good info to print out and have in your hardcopy reference materials. Its too large of a file for me to upload to the forums…

    #2303
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Hi Steve, I don’t see any PDF in our email. But you can upload PDF for everyone to see here: http://www.scribd.com/upload-document

    #2364
    Profile photo of sootsme
    sootsme
    Survivalist
    member1

    Know where any local springs are, and make sure you have filtration/purification items in your kit. Ideally, have more than you think you’ll need, for barter or other unforeseen circumstances.

    #2456
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Make friends with google maps now, and get a printer!! Cover the areas around you and your bug out location. This way you have a hard copy of of water ways and such!. At home even in a apt or house you can create a rain catchment storage unit. Make sure to have filtration/purification items. Soda bottles work well and store easyly under beds and in cupboards as well. Always have them ready!!

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #2507
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Steve, I added your PDF to your first post. Very good information!

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #3266
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    I honestly didn’t know where to put this, but figured it would serve well here. Not trying to high jack the thread honest, just adding to it!

    bleach drops

    IMPORTANT NOTE! You may need to “adjust,” to increase a drop or two if the water to be treated is dingy and/or cold! Cooler water “slows,” down the chemical reaction of the chlorine bleach so it takes a little more (or extend the time of treatment before you drink) to render the water safe. Criptosporidium is a critter with a very hard shell so it takes the chlorine a while to penetrate and tender it safe! ALWAYS use non scented bleach! Great to print a copy and keep in your BOB and other kits!

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #3283
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Water was a prime consideration in where we chose to move. Aside from the issue of water for personal use, as small farmer gardeners a necessity. Several properties we liked better we found that the source of the water, in our case springs, was not on the property. Or, upstream from a year round creek there were agricultural pollution issues so we could not expect to be able to pump from the creek onto crops without compromising food crops. Out west, some friends are growers that have gone to court because the source of water starts on their property and when they made changes, created holding ponds etc it cut off what flowed downstream to others whom had been depending on it. Know what is upstream of the water, know the source or beginning, and ideally, have it on property you control.
    We use a floating solar pump in our pond that pumps on a timer, quietly, water as needed to our small orchard and some other berry patches. I built T posts at end of garden beds from which buckets, covered with fine mesh collect water. The buckets have coupling near buttom I cut out and glued in to which are attached drip tape. If there is not enough rain to keep them filled I use water saved in rain barrels to fill them. Recently got a flojak hand pump for the well and was pleased how well it works and simple to use when needed.

    I would also suggezt to learn and practice how to douse or water witch…I learned and practiced with a gentleman that worked for a well driller in our area. Many think its a bunch of hooey…from my experience it is not. My thoughts on water at the moment…

    #3438
    bushrat
    bushrat
    Survivalist
    member4

    Totally agreed that water is extremely important. Most people do not give it the place of importance in their preps that they should. We have several different types of purification systems available in our preps.

    Also, remember, filtration and purification are two different processes. You need both. For purification I prefer a system with a 1 micron filtration capability or less. Two microns will work for some things, but I’m just more comfortable with 1 micron or less.

    We store both quantities of water, and are prepping to collect rain water as well. As far as bleach goes, don’t forget it has a relatively short self life. You are better off purchasing and using Calcium Hypochlorite in powder form for long term storage.

    #3947
    nlouise
    nlouise
    Survivalist
    member4

    I live in the high desert, which means water is limited when the grid goes down. In the winter we usually get snow and rain (although the last two years this has not happened. I have my theories). Right now we are having to re-roof our home which covers a 3,000 sq. ft area. So, while we are doing that we are adding rain gutters in which we will capture and use our rain water for whatever purpose is needed during SHTF. I have 10- 55 gallon drums on one side of my house that are always filled with clean water. I take any empty miscellaneous bottles we get from store bought items and fill those with reverse osmosis water and store them in a 26′ container out back, and have done this for about 7 yrs now. On occasion I will get a case of bottle water and store it away. I have a Berkey unit for when the grid goes down and my RO unit can no longer be useful. Other than that, we are SOL. I’ll just pray for rain.

    #4105
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    God Bless you nlouise! It struck me at an early age, the big differences in what one called ‘home’. This does not mean I think ‘my’ idea of home is ‘better’ or ‘best’. Just an aside about the miracle of diversity of we humans.

    A family member has a home, he no longer lives in, in southern Arizona. I visited exactly one time. Had cell phones been available at the time I would have been using it to make a return ticket before I got to my destination! I discovered something basic about myself that day of my first visit. To ‘Me’, (respecting the viewpoint of others) I know, for myself I can not live in a desert environment. I was raised in seasonal greenery, water, variations of topography. The first time visit to the desert (in AZ) I felt physically ill and promptly left. But, I am well aware that is me and my ingrained (?) preferences. My father and Grandparents; Aunts and Uncles loved the desert. I still do not understand that. I try to always to put myself in someone elses shoes. But, haha (if that is appropriate) in the case of desert lovers I simply can not. I do have family members that are going through major ordeals farming in various western states for which they depend on irrigation. The Central Valley in CA is only one. I am aware more, (I think?) than most in the US of thee general issues/lifestyles they have.

    That said, for whatever reason one may choose to use, I believe most people would agree weather patterns worldwide are changing. One can not know how they will impact you in your desert clime.

    So, I am being curious here, do you utilize underground cisterns? Have you made your Plan ‘B’ in the event you find your situation is not able to be maintained?

    I have several elderly family members living in the desert so I am most definitely concerned about this. They appear and do act when we speak (especially if I muster support/help) about ‘possible future needs) having either lived through the stock market crash (’29?) or just the plain old ‘Great Depression’ as we in the states refer to it. Can’t thank you enough for sharing your own personal situation and problems here for everyone. I truly regret I don’t have a basis of helpful experience to assist you further your goals.

    The land, I am sure, will know your love for it and do its best to provide for you That I have no doubt. Nature is an underrated force.

    #4108
    nlouise
    nlouise
    Survivalist
    member4

    Thank you Tweva. I moved to California about 26 years ago and loved it. I lived in the valley. I moved up to the high desert 10 years ago (today in fact) and never had a thought about water shortages…..at least back then when I moved here.
    I believe we are on a water table…problem is where I live I have absolutely no mineral rights nor do I have access to water outside the ridiculous rates we pay to a private company that has the rights. I am pretty limited in that way. I just know that by storing as much as I can now it will make life easier for a short while. If things get so bad that this is permanent then we will move on like I would imagine others will because that would mean that water would not be the only resource unavailable. I just don’t want to find myself with a case of bottled water only when it all hits.
    Also I would like to mention that in a grid-down situation have a bunch of clean buckets (Home depot has them for $3 each) ready to fill using the tap because I think the water will stop hours or maybe a day or so after the fact. Also I have found water bladders online that fit in the bathtub that can hold I think 150 gal of water should you need something right away to hold lots of water in. They cost about $25. They sort of fill up like a waterbed inside the tub. Water needs to be the first physical priority in a grid-down situation (if you are dependent on city/county for it) before it stops coming through the tap, and you will never have too much of it.

    I’ve had some crazy ideas about having someone come out with a tractor and digging a large area for me to set about 20- 55 gallon drums of water into, then covering it back up with dirt. When it is needed just use a syphoning hose to extract it from the drums/barrels. This would keep the attention away from my property and I would know where those barrels were stored.

    I wish your family the best in preparing for the water situation. There are options.

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