Viewing 12 posts - 16 through 27 (of 27 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #43178
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB, Just don’t get suckerr punched, no surprises.

    #43180
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I know 74. I can err on the side of being too nice to people that don’t deserve it. Always been that way. Fortunately I size up people and situations quickly and I stay calm when others don’t. Easily excitable or easily stressed people often make poor decisions. Come a post-SHTF environment something none of us can lose sight of is the difference between winning the battle and winning the war. The circumstances and conditions will dictate what the appropriate actions are. For now, just knowing the problem neighbor’s character ahead of time is better than not knowing. As I think about this, I am reminded that I need to make a point of meeting more of the people around here that I haven’t met yet. My having become a Town official was a great move in that I am meeting lots of folks and am becoming part of the fabric of the community.

    #43184
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    MB, agreed on being a part of the community fabric.
    I meet and see more people in my work and Scouting positions now than ever before. In a better way than copping.

    Guess I’m lucky, our neighbors are mostly LDS, generally friendly and there’s only one house on the street that doesn’t have critters hanging in the fall. And everyone genuinely seems to try to help each other. Sure there’s a little stand offish’ness from some but now that we’ve bought the house and are not going anywhere, even they are warming up.
    Location is critical, we chose our neighbors and neighborhood carefully.
    Most of the neighbors are doctors, teachers, cops, management, with a few retirees thrown in. Not the frequent flyers from the trailer park.
    It does count.

    #43200
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    You know MB when the economy is getting sucked down the rat hole there isn’t much community response ability anymore. The fabric is a bit torn apart. People are usually nice to town officials until they get their taxes. You can always count on the underclass to throw sand into the well oiled gears. It’s generational revenge these days.

    #43208
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Brulen, by community response I don’t mean govt. Local govt. here is minimal. Outside of the schools, my town only has 4 fulltime employees, and they are what constitutes the Highway Dept. We otherwise have 2 part time employees at the Town Hall and 1 at the Library, and then a number of folks like me filling various roles that receive token payments either by the hour or as a flat fee. Small towns in New England tend to have minimal local govt and use lots of committees and volunteers. For example yesterday we output this year’s property tax bills, and several unpaid volunteers came in to help us fold them and put them in envelopes to mail. I volunteer to mow and weed whack the property around an old one room school house from 1808 across the way from me. A guy told me he bought paint and plans to paint it when he has a chance. Other people volunteer to take care of the baseball field. The fire dept are all volunteers. And so forth. Post-SHTF if Town govt. is functioning at all they would convene Town Meeting for people to decide what to do. If that is not feasible, I expect my little valley that is geographically apart from the rest of Town would do its own version of Town Meeting to determine what to do. It is how things have been done in rural New England for almost 400 years.

    All that said, I agree that the fabric of the community will be stretched and perhaps torn come SHTF when many find themselves facing issues they never contemplated and are ill-prepared for. Those of us who have contemplated it and are somewhat prepared cannot survive as islands unto ourselves though, hence our having to figure out the whole neighbor thing.

    #43210
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    WB, Maybe you are right about the community being stretched in a SHTF but I like what you have very much. I wish I had that here but it is a city and I will have a lot more problems then you.

    #43211
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    freedom, all communities large and small will be stretched versus whatever their current conditions are. None of us can know for sure how ours will adjust. I am trying to be optimistic that mine will work but I can’t know that for sure. That the white trash folks across the road aren’t going anywhere is problematic but at least I know the score there. Druggies, alcoholics, and people with mental health issues are in every neighborhood, be it rich or poor, and they aren’t always visible currently. Good people and people with skills are also to be found in every neighborhood and it is with that group that we’ll all have to seek solutions with.

    #43298
    Profile photo of P1LGR1M
    P1LGR1M
    Survivalist
    member2

    Seems as if though you get weird neighbours everywhere. I personally feel that in a SHTF situation each household must show why they should be part of the community, either by skills they have, resources or a combination. The worst thing that can happen is if you have people that are only there, because they don’t have any other options at that point in time. As soon as they get a “better” proposition they may compromise/sell-out everyone else.

    We have a sort of commune a few houses down from us. It is an old house that has been converted into different “apartments” and they are rented out to some very “interesting” people. It is a bit quieter now, but at one stage the one tenant would go into a midnight-self-pity-alcohol-consuming-music-blaring mood, especially on Sunday evenings. There have also been some domestic violence issues and then the usual alcohol fuelled disagreements, but luckily to date the police have been very efficient in sorting them out and the owners have now started acting more strictly.

    My immediate neighbours on either side are very nice people, the one side is an old retired couple and the other side is actually our reverend. Across is the road is also a couple that is very much into camping and the outdoor lifestyle. One thing about our culture, is that a lot of people enjoy camping and caravanning, so most of the people in our area have the basics and some, more advanced/serious equipment, so should worst come to worst, I believe that our neighbourhood should be able to function pretty good (obviously there are the yuppies that will faint at the thought of anything less that a 5 star hotel, but that is too bad).

    There are obviously the few people in the area that I would not be to keen to have with us when SHTF, as I simply don’t get a kosher feeling around them…

    #43300
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    although I live in the middle of the Devon countryside, on the very outskirts of a small English market town, most of the people who live here are not country people, they are townies with town attitudes who commute daily to work in “urban centres”, I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of households who grow their own food, the remainder are just childrens play areas. most have relatives in other towns in the area and I fully believe the majority will leave in a SHTF event and go to these other relatives, leaving this place looking very much like a ghost town.

    British Survivalist.

    #43425
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    In support of my prior comments that local govt is minimal here and volunteers do much of the Town’s work (a good thing in my opinion if there is a general deterioration of govt in the future), here’s one that gives even me a chuckle. The toilet seat at the Town Hall had been broken off for at least a week. Having visions of somebody not noticing it wasn’t attached and then sliding off and not knowing if such a thing was already someone’s job to take care of I asked the two women that work there would I be stepping on anyone’s toes if I replaced it. The answer was no and so I went to the hardware store, bought one, and replaced it. Then I came home and mowed & weed whacked around the old one room school house across the way while some other volunteer was mowing the ballfield.

    Town Hall consists of just two large rooms. One of the women that works there wants to move her desk from one room to the other which is setting in motion moving the Listers (me), the desk used by the public to do deed transfer lookups, plus rearranging where work tables and such are. No contractors will be involved. A volunteer will handle the computer and phone line connections and we’ll otherwise move our own stuff tomorrow (Town Hall is closed on Fridays so we can do it without inconveniencing the public).

    #43447
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    MB, did you give the appropriate notice through the town crier?

    #43464
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    No, my Town isn’t all that old (1761) to have carried forward that position. Where I used to live was a much older town (1673) and they still have the position of Fence Viewer, but no excitement in that role. This morning I was with two people at the Town Hall who announced it was time for homemade donuts and coffee and asked me if I wanted to come. I had no idea what they were talking about but said sure, I like donuts. We head up the road a ways and pull into a farm and proceed into an old junk of a trailer that a woman in her 80’s lives in., the kind of place that will likely end up in a landfill when she doesn’t need it anymore. She still milks the cows herself and together with one of her sons and a grandson runs the farm. I learned that every Friday morning she makes a big batch of homemade donuts and a couple pots of coffee and has an open house. There were all sorts of people there, only one that I knew other than the two people I went with. The place was roaring with laughter and when I was leaving she was telling me to come back next week, as were others there. I was just so impressed how this woman who lives in poverty was so generous of spirit and welcoming of a complete stranger. She is rich in family & friends however, including 6 kids of her own, two additional kids she adopted from the State, 19 grandkids and a 19th great grandchild about to be born. Though they live on the other side of the mountain from me and aren’t my neighbors in that sense, they were great folks to meet. I have no regrets about relocating here.

Viewing 12 posts - 16 through 27 (of 27 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.