Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 54 total)
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  • #33560
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “Nasa scientists have predicted that the Earth is in the path of a Carrington-level event every 150 years on average”

    RTR, I’m not making the assertion that there is a cycle NASA is. It would be necessary to ask them for the data. I’m only presenting the matetial for information purposes and discussion. If you disagree with their statement I have no issue with an differing view point.

    #33562
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The price to harden the grid is somewhere in the 4 to 8 billion dollars, not much money. Obama spends that on golf trips!

    Nasa data is partly because of a solar flare that happen 1859 so they have a small amount of true data. The 150 years is around the corner, like now! We are at 155 years now.

    #33563
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Solar storm of 1859

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_storm_of_1859

    “The solar storm of 1859, also known as the Carrington Event, was a powerful geomagnetic solar storm in 1859 during solar cycle 10. A solar coronal mass ejection hit Earth’s magnetosphere and induced one of the largest geomagnetic storms on record.”

    #33565
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    freedom, 4 to 8 billion is chump change these days for the Feds. I think they quickly found something like 60 billion for NY & NJ after Sandy hit. What we lack is the will, not the money.

    #33573
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Yes I think they are not interested in hardening the grid. I would be happy is they just harden the part of the grid that supplies the nuclear power plants. That is in the $500 million+ which is pennies. If they did that it will save us from the radiation of the U. S.

    #33575
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    Guys, they ARE HARDENING THE GRID as we speak, and have been for a few years. It takes Time.

    I am in power distribution (powerhouses) and I have a good friend who is a lineman, which IS a Grid Career.

    They are doing this, according to him. It will, as it should be, Privately Funded. By the power companies!

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #33576
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    There are only so many qualified linemen in the USA, and they are all extremely busy. I had a lady from the employment service in my state ask me to apply, but at my age, (around a 1/2 century) I thought it best to stay with what I know. They are hiring and training as fast as they can! Lots of work to do, but not enough workers.

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #33577
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    undeRGRond, I hope it is true. I would be very happy if they just harden the grid to the point were the electricity stays on for the nuclear power plants which should be the priority. Remember that hardening the grid transformers will help the power plants power up after an EMP but if the EMP is very strong all the wiring will be fried, all electronics, appliances, cars, trucks, light bulbs, computers etc, will all be fried by the EMP. This will take years to renew and many will still die.

    #33580
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks undeRGRond. I sure hope that are prioritizing well the hardening that they are doing. Protecting the nuke plants would be my top priority.

    I know that being a lineman can be a dangerous job and often have crappy working conditions, but for many folks looking for opportunities it can make for a great middle class career. They can make a ton of overtime every time there is a major weather calamity. Around here the power company jobs are much coveted.

    On the private vs public issue, I really don’t care who pays for it so long as it gets done. What I would prefer however is a govt.mandate that the hardening must be done. I do not trust that the many power companies we have will all get the job done if it is purely voluntary. I used to live in the evacuation zone for the VT Yankee nuke plant (which just shut down for good last week) and did not always have a warm fuzzy feeling. A few years back a cooling tower collapsed, which I understand didn’t pose a safety hazard, but the fact that their inspections never detected it was ready to collapse made me wonder what else they weren’t inspecting. Then there was a radiation leak into the groundwater (tritium I think??) that took forever to find the source of because it was coming from underground pipes they didn’t seem to know about. Our evacuation route had us driving north a couple miles towards the plant and then taking a circuitous route to a location that was maybe 3 miles outside the zone, and which I could have driven directly to in a fraction of the time their route would have taken. Again, not a warm and fuzzy feeling. This is partly why I am not entirely comfortable that the power companies will do the right thing as regards hardening the grid without a clear mandate.

    #33581
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MountainBiker is right. The power companies are all public traded companies that only are interested in profits for the stock holders so they will cut corners.

    #33583
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Utility companies are working on the grid to improve it, however I think most of the effort is aimed at normal weather related outages as the following document demonstrates.

    http://www.eei.org/issuesandpolicy/electricreliability/mutualassistance/Documents/BeforeandAftertheStorm.pdf

    Edison Electric Institute – Before and After the Storm – Update March 2014

    Edison Electric Institute (“EEI”) has been asked by its members to update its January 2013 report to incorporate newly released studies on recommendations and best practices with regard to hardening the distribution infrastructure and creating a more resilient system, especially since the impact of Superstorm Sandy in the Fall of 2012.. The compilation provides a menu of infrastructure hardening and resiliency options, the relative cost impact of such measures, information on the various cost recovery mechanisms utilized, and a representative overview of various state programs addressing system hardening, resiliency and cost recovery. The compilation is aimed to serve as a reference tool to assist members in addressing state commissions and legislatures as they investigate possible regulatory reforms with respect to how electric utilities combat and respond to storm related outages.

    . EEI has focused its review on potential solutions for combating and mitigating storm damage and outages – system hardening and resiliency measures. System hardening, for purposes of this report, is defined as physical changes to the utility’s infrastructure to make it less susceptible to storm damage, such as high winds, flooding, or flying debris.Hardening improves the durability and stability of transmission and distribution infrastructure allowing the system to withstand the impacts of severe weather events with minimal damage. Resiliency refers to the ability of utilities to recover quickly from damage to any of its facilities’ components or to any of the external systems on which they depend. Resiliency measures do not prevent damage; rather they enable electric facilities to continue operating despite damage and/or promote a rapid return to normal operations when damages and outages do occur.

    #33616
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    That is what here in Florida FPL has been doing only. There upgrades are hardening the system for storm damage and high winds only. These upgrades will not do anything against a EMP attack or a Solar flare.

    #33617
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Other than putting all the wire underground I doubt there is an answer since the grid will act like an antenna.

    #33619
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Yes there is no answer but remember if they harden the grid mean transformers than we maybe able to get back online in a year or two. If not then it may take five to ten years to replace them. Also the radiation from the nuclear power plants would kill not only 90% of the population but also make the land non-usable for 100 years or more.

    So what they need to do first is harden the transformers. We will still have civil unrest, over 75% or more of the population die.

    #33620
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Freedom, if wires get that hot every building will burn. I really think the exposure is to sensitive parts and electronics. I’m going guess transformers are subject to damage due to the function and design. They create a lot of heat reducing voltages to usable power. When the grid amplifies and reverses power they will over heat the cooling oil contained in each one and explode.

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