Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #28658
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    My current three day load. Weighs in at about 40 pounds total.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #28674
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks for sharing what your kit has. I struggle with deciding what to carry and at the moment keep a lot of stuff in my truck, but I really need to formalize what stays in the backpack.

    #28680
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thanks for sharing this with us KOS, it is always hard decision to decide what to carry, and how heavy (detailed) should be.
    For me it is matter of decision based on current plan and event.
    Important thing is to understand that we never can have all what we want, but some basics needs to be covered.
    Good stuff!

    #28699
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    My pleasure guys. I still struggle with what to carry :D But its always ready to go at a moments notice.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #28700
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks Kos – topics like this help remind me to look at our personal go-bags and see if any changes are needed. And keeping my family in mind … ‘family go-bag.’ This week had some updates to our home emergency system with winter storms around the corner. Making sure all the basics are well covered first and keep in mind possible SHTF scenarios.

    #28741
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    Nice!
    And only 40#, good work!

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #28752
    Profile photo of drunkmonkey
    drunkmonkey
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Hi Kos,
    Good topic As we say when it comes to American Football, “Speed Kills!” The lighter you are the faster you will move, flank and retreat when necessary. Also you will be able to travel greater distances burning less calories in the process. I have my primary gear almost the same as you with rifle, 240 rounds of ammo and 2 liters of water down to 44 lbs. load out. This includes a 5 day supply of dehydrated mountain house food pouches + protein bars rationed at 1400 calories per day (2 mountain house pouches per day & 1 protein bar). Remember an Army marches on its stomach, most people forget this important fact. All of my primary gear is concealed in a civilian Camelbak outdoor adventure book-bag with a low profile and no external frames. In my area the key is to blend in with the local civilian population. I would also wear civilian American work pants and work shirt. in subdued brown/ green khaki colors. The only thing that would give me away would be the scoped rifle which I could rap in my civilian brown poncho so you would not see it until I am up close. Also I would be wearing military issue boots which could give me away when I am up close but it is what i am used to wearing and I trust them more than civilian shoes. From a medium distance I would blend in with the rest of the people. I hope…

    #28755
    Profile photo of drunkmonkey
    drunkmonkey
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    I should try walking around with my gear in public leaving the rifle at home of course and see if people notice me walking around and look to see if they have any reaction while things are still normal. An experiment to see what their body / facial language would tell me, and maybe walk past the local sheriff patrol and see if they found me suspicious at all during current normal times. I would have nothing to hide because all my gear is civilian style outdoor camping gear. Think that might be a good experiment for us to try out? let me know if I am being an idiot…

    #28757
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Morron alert

    #28775
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    The great part about where I live is that if i don’t shower for a few days and wear overalls i blend right in, even with a rifle. If SHTF im going to stuff everything in a garbage bag, and then into my sleeping bag over my shoulder until I am out of town.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #28879
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    74 wrote:

    Moron alert

    Sounds like a bad idea…
    I would suggest doing this SOBER, Monkey! ;)
    If you insist on following through with this plan, I would start light and add gear after a few (SEVERAL!) runs. Lets the “non-prepping” folks get used to you a little at a time. Hopefully it is a small community! :P

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #28894
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    i have to know why i’m bugging out before I activate my BO plan. But say the plan is to get out of dodge in plain sight the first way I would think of would be railroad tracks (unused is best), river or vertical. Get to a highpoint. Around here it usually means a steep 1000 foot climb thru woods and rocks. I like the froggy toggs khaki poncho. I think you could pick a tree sit down and pretty much become part of the terrain with it on. Move rest listen move. It would be a cold camp & lightless as long as people are around. One of my sleeping bags was designed as a guard bag. It has arms on the upper part and unzips in the middle. Good for having to deal with night time visitors. BO and you never know what you’ll run into…dogs kids bear deer moose hikers rednecks snowmobilers marijuana farms, other woodsmen. lol (don’t forget the pepper spray). Walking Dead is great for unexpected BOs.

    #28909
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    Brulen. I wouldnt advise taking a railroad if SHTF.

    1. In the event of a fuel crisis they are the most efficient way to travel and transport supplies, there will be a lot more traffic.
    2. The tracks are absolutely saturated with cameras at every bridge, sensors, air patrols, and work crews. ( i have family who work for railroad etc)
    3. being on the tracks with a weapon could = terrorist charge per the new laws that changed here in canada ( no idea elsewhere but they will definitely protect logistic infrastructure), rail roads are frequently targeted by gorillas in occupied countries, with marginal success because they are so closely watched. (supply lines).
    4. In non SHTF times rail roads are a magnet for homeless and criminals alike, even if the cameras dont get you, they may rat you out, they like to hide in grain cars, and migrate from inner cities to the coast via rail lines nearly every fall and winter.
    5. lots of people have had this same idea.

    If shtf and your looking for a walking path out of town, i suggest following the clear cuts that power lines follow. They usually are not well defined on maps, people don’t realize they run for hundreds and hundreds of miles, and the odds of running into someone doing maintenance is very small compared to the rail road. Also, the service buildings and roads are usually well supplied with survival gear and emergency communication equipment. Its not as easy a walk as a rail road, or road. but it beats breaking bush.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #28910
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Good call KOS. They are observable using Google maps in satellite view. They tend to meander around near the urban areas a bit and there are no bridges, but if you need path they are definitely going to be less traveled than other routes.

    #28956
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I don’t know about elsewhere but in my experience those power line cuts often have actual trails weaving through them. My friends and I often took our mountain bikes on them. There would be other trails coming in from the surrounding forests intersecting with the power line trails.

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