Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • #39908
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10
    #39910
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirlibird, With the way the news media is now we will not see any news on good police officers period. Only the bad one’s will get on the news.

    Like everyone in society in every profession there is a small percentage that are bad which make the rest look bad. For example Attorneys have this problem, everyone things they are all bad but many are very good people that help many and do good things. The same goes for the police which 99% are good people and that 1% make the rest look bad.

    One thing that I have to say about the police is that it is a VERY hard job. It takes a special person to be a police officer and that is were the problem lies. Not many can do this job. They are also underpaid for what they do and how much responsibility they have. That is my opinion.

    #39917
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Its not an attorneys job to be good or bad …………if they are doing their job , they are neutral , their job is to represent and win cases , the client is irrelevant .

    #39920
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I don’t doubt but that the majority of police are trying to do the right thing. The problem is that the ones that aren’t are tolerated. “Independent review” has practically become code for “nothing will happen”. The police unions protect their own no matter how egregious the conduct. Police Chiefs tend to look the other way, though I don’t really understand that one because it could eventually cost the chief his or her job when the public gets angry enough. Part of the problem is that candidates aren’t being well enough screened and trained.

    Here in VT last year an officer in one town was promptly arrested and fired when it was discovered he stole drugs from the evidence locker. New security procedures were quickly instituted. The chief signaled the community and the rest of her force that she will not tolerate corruption and that what happened will not happen again. That’s the kind of leadership that is needed in every community. This past winter there were 2 instances where police were arrested for DUI. In many places police would have looked the other way when they realized it was a fellow officer driving drunk. That they were instead arrested gives the community confidence that police don’t see themselves as being above the law. This is the way it should be.

    If the reason people get speeding tickets or other moving violations is so as to encourage safe driving habits and keep the roadways safe, then off duty police should get tickets too when they get pulled over, yet they don’t. My brother has a heavy foot and whenever he got pulled over, he’d just flash his Sheriff’s Dept badge and would be on his way no matter what town he was pulled over in. They view it as professional courtesy. I view it as a double standard and low grade corruption.

    #39923
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Unfortunately the humanistic side of LEO’s is rarely in the news. If that was a requirement with incentives it might change the public’s impression of LE. What do you suppose is going to happen in California when LE gives out tickets for taking long showers?

    #39925
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tolik, Yes you have a point but in every profession there are bad apples and the U. S. is very big so there will always be bad apples with police officers. The thing that needs to change is what MB said “Independent review”. The change will start to happen and more police officers will come forward with the bad apples. Also the cameras that many will start to carry on them will change things too.

    But it is a hard job when you stop someone that is a criminal and you do not know what will happen next.

    #39938
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Q: What country has the hight incarceration rate in the world ?
    A: The United States

    That tells you everything we need to know , its a business and they are there to fuel the system . Take away for profit prisons ……..then and only then , will you see things actually change . Take the money away and you will see BS laws go away , you will see real change .

    #40021
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Tolik poses an interesting question about the high incarceration rate. I don’t know what the answer is but I suspect the for-profit prisons is but one small piece of the puzzle. I think the overwhelming majority or prisoners are in govt-run prisons. I also believe the prison population is very disproportionately black and based on drug offenses. The war on drugs clearly has failed. Black families and black urban culture clearly have failed too. Do Americans do more drugs than Europeans or do the Europeans approach the issue differently? Drugs aside, does the US make more things illegal than other countries do?

    #40026
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    “I don’t know what the answer is but I suspect the for-profit prisons is but one small piece of the puzzle. I think the overwhelming majority or prisoners are in govt-run prisons. I also believe the prison population is very disproportionately black and based on drug offenses. The war on drugs clearly has failed. Black families and black urban culture clearly have failed too ” – Mountain Biker

    I agree. For- profit prisons are not a large enough tail to wag the entire dog of high incarceration rates. Even so, there’s an unavoidable conflict of motives: increasing profits (and kickback$) depends on increasing convictions, which ultimately depends on increased crime. But governmentally or privately, warehousing criminals (as if that would “cure” anything except temporarily, opportunity to commit certain crimes) is an industry, employing millions of highly-paid people: judges, clerks, attorneys, bailiffs, police, and prison guards, a large enough segment of the voting population to raise huge political influence PACs, and scream bloody murder when their money-trough is threatened. And who dares say otherwise — after all, if you don’t want to lock up everybody from axe-murderers to jaywalkers, you’re “Soft on Crime!” It’s the American way: don’t solve problems, turn them into industries!

    So, how does a government, concerned as it is with preserving certain “more important” employment rates and positive public images, keep the party going? 1) Run the economy in such a way as to economically hamstring all but the most talented and hard-driving in the other trades and professions, knowing that the “losers” will find more “reasons” to commit crime, as they find fewer reasons to refrain; 2) Since the Public Fool System is prison boot camp, teach all the school kids that they needn’t put any effort into deserving good grades — even when they “screw off”, and disrupt the classroom, they’re “entitled” to “self esteem;” and a “share” of everyone else’s efforts; 3) Put “first-timers” in jail/prison with hardened multiple-offenders, a continuous seminar in advanced criminal technique; 4) Carefully fail to intercept the massive importation of all, but the traditional yearly, headline-worthy 10% of “busted” cocaine, heroin, et al, knowing that the bulk of it will induce crime, in the dispirited parts of society. There are probably more ways, but these play important roles.

    There are exceptions, of course, but most of those whom we task with solving our crime problems, have an unacknowledged vested interest in making sure that their claim of necessity never declines. I’m not saying that most of them take conscious, deliberate steps to foster crime, but their representative organizations can be counted on to oppose anything that cuts into their claim for increased pay and benefits. And sheeple don’t put effort into anything beyond occasionally griping. People invariably favor whatever they perceive as their self-interest. It all helps to keep the crime rates up, and an industry rolling along.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #40037
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Anything that govt. funds quickly has an entire industry feeding on it and doing what they can to make it grow. Part of the problem that generates such a large prison population and that generates layers of additional laws and regulations each year is that the public demands it. Anything that goes wrong, any bad thing that happens, and there are cries for action to stop it from happening again, often from the industries that would benefit from increased regulation. As a society we often end up with solutions that are far bigger than the problem.

    A different approach is needed. Just using drugs as an example being this is what is behind a huge portion of the prison “justice” system, if instead of putting people in jail for possession or use of drugs we instead held them accountable for the effects we’d probably have a lot of empty prisons. Note that even if drugs were completely legal I personally would not partake. I have no interest at all. By holding accountable I mean they go to jail if they fund their habit via robberies or such, or we deny them public housing and other entitlements if their drug use is a factor in their inability to support themselves, or they are caught driving under the influence, and so forth. Merely possessing or using would not send someone to jail as occurs now.

    The same approach would make sense for gun crimes, another big industry. Merely possessing a gun should not send someone to jail as occurs in many jurisdictions now. Using the gun to commit a crime should.

    It really is time for a re-thinking of why we have so many in prison.

    #40061
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    “It really is time for a re-thinking of why we have so many in prison.”

    Oh, yeah! Maybe after TSHTF, and we get to where we are really going, those who can climb out of this handbasket, may care to re-think a whole lot of stuff. But doesn’t re-thinking imply that one has already done some thinking?

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #40069
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Some have done a lot of thinking. Lots of laws and lots of prisoners makes money for lots of people.

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