Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #25516
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    I have recently finished up this season of prospecting for gold in Canada. Here are the lessons I have learned by roughing it in the wild, just me, the dog, shotgun and the bears.

    #1 selco speaks the truth about many of the things a person encounters when your supply chain is cut off, your gonna get smelly, you have to watch for infections, practice awareness, and stress/loneliness/boredom make it hard not to want to drink, smoke etc.

    #2 everything takes about 3x longer to do then what “civilized” life had me accustomed too. A sponge bath takes about 45 minutes. Laundry is a pain in the sack.

    #3 everyone is polite when you carry a shotgun. Except for the yuppies I encountered who didn’t have so much as bear spray in the middle of grizzly country. I **** you not, one of the sons in this family went out for a “jog” every day in an area I had spotted one large cinamin bear, 2 large black bears, and 1 small black bear. FYI if you dont already know, never run from a bear… they are like cats, they see something running they chase it instinctively.

    They sure had a lot of nice stuff tho. 6x solar panels and battery bank, huge RV etc. Just no brains.

    #4 There are ******** in the bush… all in one morning one guy in his truck ripped out a boat launch, took a **** right in the middle of camp, and poached a chicken also in the middle of camp, leaving the guts right there. No i did not confront them. no point.

    #5 I am not immune to the human condition known as loneliness. I thought I was tough, until i broke down and absolutely HAD to talk to someone. I will never again take for granted even the company of the village idiot.

    #6 Living off the land is a bullshit fantasy, eat to much fish you will get mercury poisoning. Preserving meat is not as easy as it sounds in a wet climate (i did not hunt this year… all i saw where bears and wild chickens/squirrels and on average 5 hunters in trucks per day on dirt roads… and clear cut forrest… what wasnt cut down was killed off by insects and we had huge wild fires this year).

    #7 smoke inhalation from 100000 hectar wild fires over 200 km away will make you irritable, lethargic, AND chase all the game away. I did not so much as hear a bird chirp for a whole month due to smoke conditions. It was biblical red sky, and the smoke was so heavy it looked like water falls over the mountains.

    #8 most people are so scared of the bush they wont venture more than 50 yards out from a road during the day. and they will look at you funny if they find out that you will/do on a weekly basis.

    #9 old school gold prospectors where the toughest mother lovers on the planet. I cannot believe how soft i am compared to the guys who broke 100km of trail, sometimes solo with nothing more than a double barrel shotgun, provisions, and a gold pan/shovel.

    #10 people shoot carelessly along side dirt roads… never camp directly beside a dirt road… anticipate morons firing aimlessly into the bush at chickens… and road signs…

    mmm thats all ive got for now. I was going to try camping over winter solo, but i have reconsidered, I am not tough enough to do that, it is absolutely true that you can go bush crazy.

    Wouldnt trade the experience for anything in the world. Nothing gets your heart beating faster then a bear 20 feet from your camp.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #25523
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Welcome back, have a few questions, but will post when on real computer.

    #25529
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks for sharing KOS. I hope the trip was worth your while as concerns finding gold.

    #25534
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Great experience! Thank you for sharing. Yes, living off the land is mostly fantasy. Even the Natives in the Alaskan village where we lived had all kinds of modern equipment (while taking advantage of all the “subsistence” loopholes for hunting regs, as all Alaskans do.) It can be done, but best done with a group…

    And bears…once you’re in their country, you are no longer at the top of the food chain. Glad you made it, and glad, too, that it showed you some of your weak points. That is more important than people realize. Then you can prep for dealing with those areas.

    Although Jack London was only in the Yukon for a few months, before he drank himself into serious scurvy and had to be shipped out, he understood the lonely silence of the wilderness. It figures in some of his stories. It is much worse in the winter, esp with heavy snow and darkness, so you are wise to reconsider solo in winter.

    Hope to hear more if you want to share.

    #25540
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Glad you made it back safe and sound. Thanks for the great post. Why is it people waste ammo shooting at signs anyway? Never understood it.

    #25563
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Tweva, probably because they have already wasted themselves on drugs or alcohol…

    #25718
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thanks for sharing KOS, you make some good points there, and learned very good lessons.

    Wouldnt trade the experience for anything in the world. Nothing gets your heart beating faster then a bear 20 feet from your camp.

    Yep, you can not buy experience like some kit, it is precious.

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