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  • #52767
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Before things devolve into a true SHTF scenario, we can reasonably expect massive government crackdown on freedoms – of thought, travel, transaction, association, religion, whatever they deem a potential threat to the State. There have been more and more moves toward a “cashless society,” with several countries already essentially there. And with the current $10,000 figure affecting so many different things in our own country (for those here in the U.S.), it’s going that way here, as well. Everything that can be tracked/traced will be tracked/traced – is the goal. So during that interim between here and total breakdown of society, outlawing of anything except fully traceable/trackable transactions of any sort should be expected. How? NOT by some untraceable currency like Bitcoin. They may nor may not be able to track Bitcoin transactions, but I suspect detection will be more than enough to eliminate offenders from open society.

    Vladimir Putin is starting the ball rolling publicly (not that it hasn’t been in play already). Last month (October 2017) he announced that while Russia will never allow Bitcoin and other non-government cryptocurrencies to operate in Russia, they are now aggressively moving forward to create their own official CryptoRuble. And the announcement itself has a massive clue to what this really means. It should sound very familiar to Americans familiar with the $10,000 rule, and/or the ability of law enforcement to label any “suspicious” cash to be evidence of criminal and/or terrorist activity, and implement “civil asset forfeiture,” as promoted heavily by the current AG (Jefferson Sessions).

    Once fully implemented (and this initial announcement is only turning up the frog’s water temperature a couple of degrees for now), a government controlled electronic currency will mean that every single transaction denominated in the official national cryptocurrency will be instantly known, and fully traceable/trackable. Note the brief “reassuring” reference in the article that Russians will be free to convert their CryptoRubles to “cash” at any time – as long as they can satisfactorily document the source of their cryptocurrency. Does that remind anyone of the $10,000 limits on cash transactions in the United States?

    There are many articles suddenly springing up about Putin’s announcement last month of fast-tracking the CryptoRuble. We can logically and fully expect the same movement in the U.S., of course.

    https://cointelegraph.com/news/breaking-russia-issuing-cryptoruble

    https://ethereumworldnews.com/installing-atm-may-crime-russian-officials-reply/

    So, what do YOU have for barter? (That’s a rhetorical question – not intended to be answered here in public, just for personal consideration/preparing.) 90% silver dimes and quarters, Silver Eagles, or particularly paper dollars will not only be worthless after the turn-in date, they’ll be flat out dangerous. Selco has mentioned some items in his earlier articles that were of high value. Perhaps there needs to be more personal planning in this area, not just food, water, heating capability, ammunition, etc.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This topic was modified 2 weeks, 5 days ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    • This topic was modified 2 weeks, 5 days ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #52950
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Considering the cost of AR magazines, lower receivers, BCG’s, lower parts kits and barrels, it’s definitely the time to be putting some back.

    #52951
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    Possible barter goods: motor oil,.lube grease, soaps, detergents, household bleach, water purification filters, surgical and work gloves, surgical dressings, disinfectants, sterile saline, feminine needs, small files, drill bits, small boxes of nails and construction screws of various lengths. food-grade buckets with lids. Many of these things will be available through normal sources … until they just aren’t, any longer.

    If you can stay where you are, and trade with the people in your neighborhood/town, you may only need to provision yourself/family to ease decline into the Middle Ages. If you expect to need to abandon your present digs before your continuing life/health betrays you to the authorities, then you already know what to stock.

    There’s a point of decline, past which, life itself has little value, except to irritate those pushing for further decline.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #53078
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Toilet paper …………like gold to people who dont have any lol

    #53085
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    TP will be good barter stuff for as long as you can stay put, but though easy to store, it’s hard to hide & to take much with you when/ if you need to bog out.

    The trick is to figure out what can serve as a medium of exchange in lieu of “cash,” when cash becomes unavailable or verboten. It must be easily recognizable, commonly desired, relatively durable, divisible/scalable, and not immediately usable against the bearer. Common cartridges may do, but only for exchanges with trusted parties. I don’t expect the fedgov to immediately outlaw common minor US silver coinage, though eventually they might. But by then, we’ll be deep into the collapse/Dark Ages, and all exchanges of goods are likely to be one of a kind, until some sort of order is restored.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #53110
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Not always , look at the Great Depression of the 30’s , money was pretty much worthless. One thing people did regularly to survive , was non tangible . Skills were traded , if you know how to do something that others dont , its the same as a physical item . One of the biggest things that happen in situations like that , is to simply keep what you already have running , and in half way , good condition . People traded skills as a matter of fact , as there was not enough physical money on hand to begin with . Outside Nuclear war , or civil war ( which includes all forms of government tyranny ) , situations are relatively short lived . Humans dont like chaos , we aren’t built that way . We need stability , and tend to rebuild again fairly quickly . We would be hunter gatherers to this day if we didnt need that . Especially in todays society , its more important than ever, to know how to do something with your hands . Learning a trade will be as valuable as gold , both to you , and to other people . Even in the Dark Ages , people who had a needed skill were protected , because people needed them , peasant and noble alike . Hell , glass blowers were so highly valued , that the English crown , would bestow knighthood , and land , to any that would come to England from other countries .

    #53228
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    (edited to add missing text)

    Tolik, I agree with almost everything you just said, except, “money was pretty much worthless” (in the Great Depression of the 30’s). Actually it was quite valuable, but there wasn’t much to go around. You could get a cup of coffee for a nickel, and a sandwich for a dime. A house was worth in the low thousands, but few had enough to buy one. My Dad bought a new Ford model T for $225 (before I was born.)

    The country “got out” of the depression with arms manufacturing jobs paid for with the new currency “created” (inflated) to finance WWII “Money,” such as it was, became less valuable, but more plentiful, continuing on (somewhat unevenly) to the present. Many of those manufacturing jobs have gone to China (ammo, boots, uniforms) or Mexico (cars, trucks.) The (full two ounce) Hershey bar I could buy for a nickel when I was five, has slimmed down to an ounce and 5/8, and now retails for $1.39- $1.69. Cheap coffee (Mickey D’s, etc) is a buck a cup, and the cheap sandwich is $2 -$3, (I don’t even consider the chi-chi $5 coffee and the $10 sandwiches.) And now, despite all the happy talk about bringing jobs back, and making the stock markets roar again, many cannot find the kind of work for which their continually debased “education” prepares them.

    These days, our “economy” is more like that which preceded the Great Depression. Plenty of “money” at low rates, is available for those with assets and secure, high-paying jobs. Less is available for those with lesser sources of income and fewer assets … at somewhat higher rates. But the entire financial edifice is a shaky house of cards, at best. Governments “need” (demand) an ever-increasing percentage of what the employed and profitable earn, to pacify, and buy the votes of, the growing non-productive segment of the population. With a currency based on ones and zeroes (more zeroes than ones, these days) confiscation of savings and retirement accounts, by both bank and government is only a matter of time.

    Having a profession, a trade, a skill, to exchange for goods and other services, is essential. Having a clientele wealthy/skilled enough to barter for it is a bonus. Having a safe place to practice it is wise. But it looks like, from the discussion so far, that there is no immediately dependable alternative to “money,” if/when it fails.

    FWIW:

    https://goldswitzerland.com/11000-kg-gold-for-a-painting-will-cost-110-kg-in-2025/

    (hat tip: Survivalblog.com)

    Cry, "Treason!"

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 2 days ago by Profile photo of L Tecolote L Tecolote.
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