Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #52333
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    With all that has gone on in the past weeks with weather, it got me to rethinking some things. Ideally we would all like to have multiple places to BO to in an emergency if plans A,B or C don’t work out. We would like to have each of those locations pre-stocked or caches along the way but what if you don’t have a second location. What if you have a second location but it isn’t stocked. What if the emergency is so wide spread, access to other locations isn’t possible. Watching Houston flood was terrible. There was flooding 30-40 miles away due to swollen rivers and creeks inundated with 50+ inches of rain. I was fortunate enough to avoid the flooding directly but it made me think about having to move fast. There were places that have NEVER flooded that ended up with 2 and 3 feet of standing water. People thought they were safe only to realize it was getting deep and they had to leave NOW or they weren’t going to get out without being rescued by boat. So how are your preps set up and stored? We all hate to walk away from all we have amassed but none of it does you any good if it gets soaked or you are dead. We all have go bags with this and that in it as well as food for a few days stored close at hand or in our vehicles. I am going to start setting up food go kits. In the event I have to take my family and possibly live out of my vehicle until I can get to high ground/safe place, I want to have food items stored in such a way as to make them easy to load. Trying to pick and choose what items and what to carry them in at the time of an emergency is not good. I am probably going to put them in square sealable buckets that way they have handles and will stack well without much wasted space. I will be filling them with items that don’t have to be cooked but don’t require water to make them either. Obviously canned goods will make up a large portion of them since they will probably handle rough handling and stacking the best. I think arranging each bucket as a per person bucket with several whole meals in them would be best. That way each bucket has breakfast lunch and dinner for a few days and it won’t matter what bucket is grabbed as long as you get X number of buckets per person. Your vehicle space will dictate how many buckets you can carry. It just seems easier not to have to worry about what bucket to grab. It would suck to grab a bunch of buckets in the heat of the moment only to find out later all you had was a some buckets of canned corn and buckets of canned beans. Anybody else have any suggestions for a hasty relocation with no immediate place to go?

    #52334
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    How about explore options of relocation to a state that has few , or no natural disaster probabilities ? Arizona doesnt have anything . You might get heat stroke , or die of boredom . The Northeast , you do have to think about hard winters . No place will be perfect . My best advise is not to get attached to any place too strongly . Never been through a hurricane or any other event similar , but I do know , that once would be enough for me to get the hell out of that area of the country . No job ,or place, is worth your life man . An FTP plan may better serve in the long run . What is an FTP ? F*ck This Place . I did that when I made the decision to move across country . I put myself in the frame of mind that is not a ” what if ” , but rather a ” I AM ” leaving this place . After that , things fall into place very quickly . Your not planning for some hypothetical event , that is not by choice . You are planning for a definite event , whatever it takes to get to a place that better suits you . That puts you in control from the get go , rather than being at the mercy of …….

    #52340
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Matt, I Iike your bucket idea. Where to go depends upon how long you think you need to be gone for. If just for a few days or a week, anywhere that you are safe from the elements and two legged predators would do. The other end of the spectrum where you are not coming home again is much harder. Food, water, heat, and security need to be part of that plan..

    Tolik, yes FTP needs to be part of it. For me personally we are where we are. I have no place to go, and my wife’s health is such that she isn’t walking anywhere far. She’d have a tough time walking the quarter mile to the end of our property. That said, I chose where we live now on the basis that we aren’t going anywhere. We’re in a small hamlet, have hand pump on the well that will yield limitless water that does not need filtering, are on septic so the toilets will work, have a wood stove and acres of trees to fuel it, and have acres of fields and pasture for food production. Good neighbors are a real plus too, though there is a white trash family the rest of us aren’t too keen on. I do maintain a cordial relationship with them though just in case they are still here when TSHTF.

    #52342
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    It’s a bit expensive, but we were fortunate enough to be given some Mountain House freeze dried meals that will last about 14 days. We’ve sampled about 4 of them just to see what we’re “in for,” but overall not too bad. I’m sure there are other good brands out there of the fully ready-made variety, but the reviews of this brand seem to be pretty high, so we’re satisfied and would replace them if needed with the same. Heat water (to boiling if possible), add it to the bag in which the food comes, stir it once, then serve it. THAT is convenient! Have a means for heat (fire?), a pot to boil a little water in (or perhaps a little larger amount if you have to sterilize it for other purposes), these types of meals, and you’ll do very well very easily in the food department.

    Bugging out may or may not even be possible. If we got hit with a large EMP (either solar or nuclear), our vehicles would not work. So not only would we not have electrical power for the foreseeable future, we also would have no means of traveling any significant distance and still be able to carry our needed things with us. And our journey may also be through some hostile territory as well. Each of us needs to keep these kinds of scenarios in mind with respect to our own personal locations and circumstances, and plan as best we can. Imagine Harvey or Irma AND a simultaneous EMP, meaning trucks with supplies, vehicles with law enforcement or rescue, etc., simply would not be coming. Massive destruction in our immediate area? We may have to literally build shelters from existing rubble.

    And even if we can travel in a vehicle, once gas runs out, we live where the vehicle sputters to a stop. Fuel shortages in almost any disaster are virtually automatic. Horders will be filling up multiple 5 gallon gas cans, fights will break out (probably most of us have already seen that in past gas shortages) – the gas will go almost as quickly as the stock on grocery store shelves.

    One thing both my wife and I do is always fill up by the time we get to ½ tank. And in our storage shed we keep four 5-gallon cans full that we try to rotate (especially when prices swing down). It may not be safe to put those in the back of a vehicle (especially an enclosed one, such as a regular car with the cans in the trunk), but you do what you’ve got to do in a true crisis.

    We splurged and got a hard shell bed cover for my truck. Much can be both hidden and protected from the elements that way. We’ve also put together several plastic containers with lids, each with specific things in them as our ideal BO kit (meaning what we can get in the back of the truck if we’re fortunate enough to be able to take it).

    We’re also looking at saving up for something like the new Goal Zero Yeti 1400 Lithium Power Station and a couple of the portable 100 watt solar panels with a 30′ cable to charge the unit (it will take up to two separate panels charging it at a time). Somebody needs to use a CPAP machine? Recharging phones in case there is still at least some cell service? A CB radio? Lights at night? Even a few rechargeable power tools or a laptop? No problem with such a device. Expensive? Depends on which side of the disaster we’re on, while looking at the cost.

    http://www.goalzero.com/

    One planned item that also needs to be organized and added is a container with important papers as well as family records, photos, etc. – in case we can never come back to get them. We’re working on as much archival storage as possible so the photos will be well preserved years from now, along with documents. Scanning and saving on long-term DVDs is also a good idea. There may or may not be a way of looking at them in the future on a working computer, but how much space do a few DVD cases take up “just in case?” Comfort and connection later on may be almost priceless – not a necessity for living, but a way of living more nicely.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #52347
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    MCW and LRRP rations are the same thing , with different color packaging . Both are Mountain house , just repackaged for the military . I picked up a case of LRPs , there is more food in a smaller package , compared to the same mains you get at the store , same menu . The military version I find better , because it has more food in smaller package . Just break down the MCW or LRP to the mains , and what you like in the rest of the meal , toss the rest .

    #52348
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I agree the Mountain House tastes about the best out of the ones we have tried. Price wise we have opted for the Wise Food Storage. The flavor is comparable but you get more for your money. Both come in square buckets which is where I got the idea. Every scenario is going to have its own unique set of challenges. One thing that causes a big problem with hurricanes is evacuation. If you time your exit wrong you may very well end up weathering the storm in your vehicle. With the oh so sensational media it is sometimes hard for many to decide when and if they should leave. I have a friend who lives in Boca Raton, FL. She is not married and is not really a prepper(that probably changed last week). I spent the days prior to Irma making landfall trying to help her get ready. She knew the minimal basics of getting ready for a hurricane, non-perishable food, water and board up the windows. As we worked through the process there were a lot of “I never thought of that” moments. It was too late for some of the items but she did try to find some of them and saw all the empty shelves for herself. Fortunately the hurricane missed hitting them directly but I bet she will be better prepared for the next one.

    Important docs are something a lot of people overlook. There are several dry bags available designed to be submerged and sized for stacks of documents. If maybe you don’t have the room/time to take your documents with you these bags could be used to protect them. Put your docs in the bags and put them back in a locked file cabinet. The bags could even be used to protect the docs if you are taking them with you.

    #52351
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    You could always copy your documents on security paper. I have some survey maps that are rolled. They would need to be preserved in waterproof fireproof containers. I suppose if you wanted to prove they were really yours you could have your fingerprints inked on your papers or a dna sample. Lol. Ancestry dot com stuff. Hackers can get most of your personal info but they cant duplicate dna.

    #52368
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Honda Dio 140 mpg with a B0 bag. Great for short distances. Longer range a 250cc BMW. Sidecar is nice. I have a yamaha diesel generator. The guy I bought it from said he used to go up to hunt in canada and bring the meat back on a trailer with the generator running powering a freezer.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.