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  • #46010
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    This was a real head scratcher! Could it be the frankenfood we’re eating? All the chemicals polluting everything? Something even more sinister? Look at the entire rest of the world (well at least a good representative cross section of it), and we’re the ONLY nation with a rising death rate per 100,000 population in the 45-54 age range! This is a rather amazing chart, to say the least, if even close to accurate (I took enough statistics in school that I’m comfortable questioning ANYbody’s statistics). I don’t have back up for this, but on the surface, it would seem reasonable to assume it to be accurate short of strong evidence of error or fraud. And this has been going on now for over 20 years, according to the chart.

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-OBAvIRml4FY/VmmyNm4_KAI/AAAAAAAAeBI/vSyxIZW31fg/s1600/5.jpg

    Food for all kinds of thought….

    (The above chart came from the Economic Policy Journal, and the chart article is about halfway down the page. There are other VERY interesting articles as well (not anything you’d want to read to your kids as bedtime stories – or perhaps even ruin your own sleep by reading them to yourself late at night.)

    http://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This topic was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #46025
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I like that term “frankenfood ” , need to remember that .

    #46028
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Interesting. Two of my brothers died in that range. One at 47 of cancer and one at 54 due to diabetes.

    #46029
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    [I had just posted a response that went a little further in wondering out loud if it’s something in the food, since Hispanics often don’t eat all the same things (or as much, at least) that Americans of European descent eat. Then I found the following, and decided to entirely replace what I’d originally posted.]

    This is a very interesting comment to the article linked in my original post on the topic (the one containing the chart). The person making the comment below found the original article (or at least the abstract). I’m reproducing it for interest. Very thought provoking, at minimum.

    The source: http://www.pnas.org/content/112/49/15078.abstract

    From the abstract:

    “…This increase for whites was largely accounted for by increasing death rates from drug and alcohol poisonings, suicide, and chronic liver diseases and cirrhosis. Although all education groups saw increases in mortality from suicide and poisonings, and an overall increase in external cause mortality, those with less education saw the most marked increases…”

    Source: PNAS.org Anne Case and Angus Deaton, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Department of Economics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544

    Looks to me like poor lifestyle choices are responsible for the increase in mortality primarily due to chronic drug and alcohol abuse. An interesting question to answer would be what incentive do non-Hispanic whites in their peak earning years have to engage in this behavior that’s apparently absent in peer cohorts. Drugs and alcohol are expensive so perhaps the higher price discourages chronic use by other groups? No matter the reason this study points toward this being self-inflicted. Liberty includes the freedom to harm oneself so perhaps non-Hispanic whites are more free in the US versus other nations? Or is overindulgence on chemical escapism a rebellious reaction to the wildly successful (*sarcasm) prohibition on drugs? This is a thought-provoking topic worthy of an economics blog.

    The main article posted on the PNAS web site also added:

    The ratio of black non-Hispanic to white non-Hispanic mortality rates for ages 45–54 fell from 2.09 in 1999 to 1.40 in 2013. CDC reports have highlighted the narrowing of the black−white gap in life expectancy.

    The main article (not just the abstract) is VERY interesting, including the death rates for college-educated vs. non-college educated whites. A whole lot of other factors are analyzed as well. But the bottom line is that middle aged whites are dying off at a dramatically faster rate than “should” be happening. But I’ll refrain from any provocative statements about white lives mattering, and all that other right wing domestic terrorist talk. If it was non-whites, such discussion would be headline news and wide open for discussion of course.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #46034
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    All groups have suffered declining employment from the depressed state of the economy (whose fault is that?), but this is the group that has been disproportionately displaced from the US labor market, courtesy (a) unrestricted alien labor at below-market wage rates that Americans burdened with (what once was “normal”) indebtedness could not stay solvent, and (b) “affirmative” action of all sorts, aimed at “affirming” that specific target group out of education and employment.

    Couple the governmentally-contrived partial ban on their employment with the (governmental) “wildly successful prohibition (sales campaign) on drugs,” and the (governmentally-sanctioned) ubiquity of frankenfood, especially high fructose corn syrup, MSG, and GMOs in everything from soda pop to beef stew, it’s no surprise that this target group would get the worst of it.

    But then, there’s no safe way to ignore what a government under the control of your enemies does.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #46039
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Affirmative action ? ………ok , lets start with pro sports .

    #46048
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    So lets look at how many of these middle aged people are in any kind of shape other than round.

    But here’s a thought or two.

    Top 5 Things That Kill Men

    FoxNews.com
    By Katherine Tweed

    There’s a lot you can’t control these days: the stock market, climate change, Monday Night Football. But you can manage much of your risk for the five most common killers of men. Lifestyle is crucial to living longer, and while genetics play a role, much of risk comes down to some tried and true advice: eat well, keep moving.

    1. Heart disease. It’s the leading cause of death in the U.S., and kills more than 300,000 men every year. High cholesterol, high blood pressure, inactivity and nutrition all play a role.
    To minimize your risk, talk to your doctor about what cholesterol level is right for you. And watch out for sodium too, said Dr. Randy Wexler, associate professor of family medicine in the College of Medicine at Ohio State University.
    “Cut your salt consumption and you can reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease by 25 percent,” he said.
    Little changes with moving can also make a big difference. The American Heart Association found that people, who moved for 30 minutes a day, even if they only exercised in 10-minute increments, reduced their risk for heart disease.

    2. Cancer. Like most diseases, cancers are both genetic and environmental. Lung cancer, prostate and colon cancer are the deadliest for men.
    “You can’t change genetics. But high fat diets have been linked to every cancer,” said Dr. Joel Heidelbaugh, assistant professor in the department of family medicine and urology at the University of Michigan.
    Usually get a 12-ounce steak? Try an 8-ounce cut instead. If you can cut 500 calories a day, that’s one pound a week. Twenty-percent of male cancer deaths are linked to obesity, according to American Cancer Society.
    Diets high in fruits and vegetables lower the risk for all cancer, but replacing the vitamins and minerals from those foods with a supplement won’t do the same thing, doctors say.
    “Every time a study comes out on supplements we’re very disappointed,” said Lisa Young, a professor of nutrition at New York University.
    The benefit of a diet high in beneficial chemicals just cannot be substituted with a pill, she said.
    Young said eating fruits and veggies instead of popping supplements adds fiber to the diet, which can lower the risk of colon cancer. Fiber also helps you feel fuller longer. Staying satisfied can help you avoid high-sodium, high-fat foods with little nutritional value that can raise the risk for other diseases.

    3. Accidents. Wexler often has to remind patients that when doctors say you should only have two alcoholic drinks a day, that includes beer. Men tend to drink more than women, and a regular beer has about 140 calories.
    And while an accidental death is not a disease, it is the third leading cause of death for men — often from fatal car crashes involving alcohol. Keeping your beer consumption in check is an easy way to keep calories in check and make sober decisions.
    Accidental prescription drug overdoses are also on the rise, according to the CDC. Be sure to go over proper dosages and any drug interactions with your doctor or pharmacist.

    4. Stroke. Risks for stroke are often the same as risks for heart disease: smoking, obesity, poor nutrition, excessive alcohol intake and diabetes. Wexler tells his patients to try some or all of the Diet Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH.
    Studies have shown this diet, which is high in fruits and vegetables, can reduce hypertension and cholesterol. Smoking and obesity can also increase hypertension, so exercise is key for stroke prevention. You don’t have to run a marathon to reduce your risk. Instead, Wexler also recommends the 10,000 Steps program.

    5. Chronic lower respiratory diseases. Emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are the two leading killers in this category. Smoking is the major risk factor, and the only way to really cut your risk is to kick the habit.
    However, researchers at Columbia University in New York City showed that nitrites from cured meats were a risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. People who ate high amounts of cured meats, including lunch meats, hot dogs and sausage products, saw an increase in risk too.
    “There’s nothing good or protective in cured meats,” Young said. Cured meats are also usually high in sodium and saturated fats, which can increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke.
    In addition to these five killers, obesity raises a man’s risk for numerous diseases including heart disease, type II diabetes, stroke and many other chronic diseases. In addition to exercise, Wexler encourages overweight patients to stick with a new diet plan for six weeks. Whether it’s cutting out a certain food, lowering your saturated fat, or just eating less, it takes six weeks for the body to stop craving something. So break out a calendar and pick one item — the payoff might just be a longer life.

    Source: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,…fnc/health/men

    #46049
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Having relocated to a lesser populated part of the country , from a city , I can believe that for those that live in large cities , especially the sprawling Western cities , air pollution from cars IS affecting your children . Respiratory problems at an early age , will only increase . Doctors in Phoenix flat out tell parents to MOVE , because its only going to get worse , and sense its environmental ( crappy big city ), there is not much they can do about it . Typical of AZ state government , instead of requiring CA emission standards for Maricopa County ( after all , the ONLY place its a serious problem in the state , is Phoenix ) , they do nothing . Like many things , first , one has to acknowledge that there is a problem , before one can take steps to correct the problem . Thats one state I wont miss . I would also believe that the lack of exercise and poor diet of many middle aged men , is a factor , doesn’t seem so much for people in their 30’s , but I see it a lot in people in their late 40’s onward . They just seem to stop being physically active , even though there is no obvious reason not to . It would be interesting to me to see a study about middle age in a rural vs. urban setting . The city doesnt exactly provide motivation to go outside and exercise , quite the opposite , it makes a person want to become a shut in . You have to force yourself to go , because just getting there is unpleasant . I would also venture to say , that people in big cities probably do drink more , vs. those in a less stressful environment .

    #46052
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Problem, Tolik: all those factors are affecting the Hispanic population just as much as the non-Hispanic white population in the US. Pollution, drinking, and lack of exercise affect us all, regardless of race. But look at the chart again, and way down in the middle of the other countries, you’ll also find the US Hispanic population – in a declining death rate along with everybody else except US non-Hispanic whites. Cholesterol problems with Hispanics – check. Heart problems with Hispanics – check. Overweight Hispanics – check. Stressed out Hispanics – check. Cancer among Hispanics – check. But only the non-Hispanic white folks are seriously increasing in death rates during middle-age (“largely accounted for by increasing death rates from drug and alcohol poisonings, suicide, and chronic liver diseases and cirrhosis,” according to the main article). And blacks, who historically have been far worse off than whites with poor health and longevity, are quickly closing the gap, per the research. So all those factors you mentioned are not variables, they’re constants. What’s the variable? Genetics? Gummint plot? Monsanto plot? White lives don’t matter? Something else? We just know it isn’t the factors you mentioned, because they’re a constant for everybody.

    What’s different about all the Mr., Mrs., and Ms. Ramirez folks vs. all the Mr., Mrs., or Ms. O’Malley folks living in sunny downtown Phoenix, AZ, USA, that’s causing the non-Hispanic white folks to be checking out of this life during their middle-age years at a rate far higher than they “should” be, after many years of increasing longevity? It’s a variable – something that isn’t the same across all the other racial groups as well.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #46061
    Profile photo of Corvus
    Corvus
    Survivalist
    member4

    I have in-laws that live in Phoenix, Az. and they are the classic transplants from the Midwest. They don’t use their swimming pool because it’s too cool in the winter or too hot in the summer, they spend much too much time sitting down trapped when inside when the sun heats the desert up, and if was not for there dog or grand children they would never get out for a walk. They have to live stuck to big Pharma drugs, and just out of sheer boredom they go to house openings to see places they will never move to. I do think Mexican-Americans (Hispanics) might be living a bit longer due to their inclusion of family members in so many of their activities multigenerational and the consumption of guess what — chiles hot peppers! turns out it is high in vitamin C, also Hispanics seem to smoke less than others (might be tight budgets) and they love to dance! So lifestyle might be what’s making a slight difference. My brother-in-law who is of German descent two years ago had a heart transplant and he started to have a real desire to eat peppers and salsa, etc., so it turned out seven months later my sister found out the donor was a Mexican AMerican who was a young man who died in a car crash. Chile can be addicting.

    #46066
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    This isnt unusual , there are many documented cases of organ recipients suddenly getting interests or abilities they didnt have prior to the transplant . One case had a man being able to read and understand Japanese without any prior study . Same thing , the organ donor was Japanese , creepy and cool at the same time .

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