Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)
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  • #31324
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    OK, this is an idea I got when I started getting extra sauce packets in the drive thru @ Taco Bell, but you can do this ANYWHERE that they give you packets, napkins, plastic Forks, Spoons, Sporks and Knives, wet naps, and anything else that is individually packaged. These items can really add up over time! Mayo, ketchup, hot sauce, etc. can have some small caloric value as well. Coffee Creamers, sugar packets, etc. Soda Straws. Salad dressings, croutons, nuts, etc. ANYTHING!!!

    Use your imagination! What can you get, really CHEAP or FREE? ASK! I always ask for extra _______ and always get it. Get to know the people who work at these places, like gas stations, fast food, etc. and they can hook you up with deals, free stuff or sometimes an empty cardboard box is a great item for temporary storage. Some places have Free 5 Gallon Buckets, I worked at a fast food place that had dark green 5 gallon buckets that pickles came packed in :D

    I also get the ¿empty? quart oil bottles, and drain them out into a larger 5 quart oil jug. Then recycle the plastic. I can get an entire oil change extra, or I use the mixed-up oil as diesel fuel, but I add gasoline as an inflammatory agent in the 20:1 (oil to gas) ratio. Works GREAT as a diesel fuel!

    I also save aluminum cans at work (construction sites) as many folks drink soda, and few recycle. I got about a 20-25 gallon galvanised trash can FILLED this summer alone! Full of CRUSHED Cans. That stuff adds UP!

    OK, now that I have jogged your imagination, help me expand my catalog of MICRO-PREPS

    Ohm almost forgot, I save those desi-paks that come in stuff that must stay dry. I probably have close to a 1/2 gallon container of those, and they can be “rejuvenated” in the oven, any temperature over 212* F will dry them out, but max I have seen is 300*F for a couple of hours. Then store in a dry ziploc bag, after cooled in a CLOSED OVEN. (This will keep the moisture out until storage) I get these in electrical construction parts at work, in most metal fittings and parts boxes. Some bigger equipment will have like 2, 3, or 5 pound bags of desiccant! THOSE ROCK!!!
    If you do not like the little cloth packets, they can be cut open and poured in a tin can, and cover it with a fine stainless steel screen, and a stainless hose clamp to hold it on. These are really easy to recharge, no problems with scorching the cloth baggie :D

    OK SHTF’ers, Your Turn!!!

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #31336
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Our well water is hard so we have a water softener. My wife doesn’t like to use that water for cooking or drinking because of the salt so we buy gallon jugs in cases of 6. I save all of the empties for possible future use. I keep a lot of bottled water stored and have a number of 7 gallon camp water containers that I’d fill if it appears that SHTF is starting and a Water BOB too for the bathtub, but I figure I’d also fill those many empties too so as to better allow us to just hole up inside the house for a period. Post-SHTF it would also allow for a lot of water to be stored inside before winter sets in so as to reduce how many trips through the snow are needed filling jugs. Alternatively I could put them outside to freeze and then use them in an ice house for keeping food cool in the summer.

    #31337
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Go to Wallmart and get the 5 gallon water bottle , for your wife for cooking , etc . the first one is a little high , but the recycle ticket when you bring back the empty , gives you a new one for only about $5 . and you get it all at once . Sometimes cheaper than a gallon at a time . I also will take other 5 gallon bottles people give me over there , its automated , so nobody knows ………..and get another full one at the lower price . Faster to stock up that way .

    #31338
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Tolik, the 5 gallon ones are too big for the frig or for her to lift if I’m not around when an empty has to be replaced. The gallon size is just logistically easier for us. We buy cases of 6 jugs at BJ’s for about $5 a case.

    #31344
    Profile photo of Aukxsona
    Aukxsona
    Survivalist
    member2

    Well, since I have land and I have a creek on said land, I invested in water filters. They came in handy once or twice already. I had an MSR mini that I used for drinking water out of the creek. I still boiled it because of viruses you know, but it worked fine when we had no water for a week. (Long story, but essentially a water pump went out and we were waiting on a paycheck to buy one)

    I also have the aquarain we use when boil alerts are on. Again, we still boil. Since I have such a large family, I thought storing water is almost pointless…at least in gallon or five gallon jugs.

    Anyway, filters cost a pretty penny, so I figured that I should probably learn how to filter it “good enough” without our filter. Also, boiling costs a penny too and it is still required after filtering from a raw source.

    So my free prep is learning how to filter using a homemade charcoal filter. I took an old water PVC pipe, some sand, gravel, and charcoal from our fire. You can sterilize the sand and gravel on your stove top ahead of time to make sure your mediums are sterile. Meanwhile closed one end of the pvc and drilled very little holes in the closed end. Packed it in as gravel, sand, charcoal, sand, gravel. Poured water through…creek water which is pretty clear. It came out the other side okay I guess. It got out the mud and stuff, which was nice.

    The main problem though is making sure it sterile. Even if I sterilized the medium, pouring through unclean water dirties it, so it has to be repacked from time to time. Also, that is the slowest I have ever gotten water back.

    Also, there is still the boiling issue. There are a couple ways to pasteurize water. I’m a huge fan of the water bottle method. You take a common water bottle (plastic) and leave it in the sun, half full. The UV is supposed to kill any bacteria. Another way is to let it in the solar oven. I have one of those now, but you can build one for almost free using a pizza box. You just cook it in the solar oven to 140 degree F. This takes a while, so you should probably have several pizza box solar ovens to have enough water everyday after filtering.

    Most free preps are just reading and recycling junk. Like my husband took tin cans and wire and then punched designs in them. At first it was to make a pretty lantern for decorations with those little tea lights in them. In the end they actually helped us get around when the flash lights went out and we were outside.

    There’s a ton of things you can do.

    When was the last time you went without electricity, running water, food, and had babies screaming for food...now you know why I prep. These are the things a mother's nightmares are made of.

    #31348
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I think that the extra sauce packets is a great idea which I also have done, we do pay for the food we buy so why not ask for more and save it. The plastic Forks, Spoons, and Knives are great in a SHTF times were water is limited and this is a free way of getting some.

    For the garden I do stay on the lookout for homes that plant flowers or trees and trash the plastic pots. I reuse them for planting. I have never purchase one.

    I change my oil of the cars and save the old oil which has many uses in a SHFT times, even to keep a fire going. The old oil has so many other uses it is to long to list here. If you pay to change your oil you can ask for your old oil.

    #31354
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Speaking of used oil, there are heaters designed to burn used motor oil. They are generally dirty as far as heating appliances go but after shtf there could be a lot of oil sitting in cars & trucks.

    #31373
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    @Aukxsona

    You can greatly extend the life of all your filters with a pre-filter, using large sections of linen and cloth… it will get most of the particles and muddy sediment. The older Berkey Black filters removed viruses, due to the silver in the filters. These are also cleanable. 10,000 gallons (or 38,000 l) per filter.

    Re: OIL, good thoughts, fellas! I will add that to my knowledge base.

    Perhaps the last current Micro-Prepping thing I do, it’s still basically FREE and even offers a future increase, is coin roll hunting, but on the Micro-level. There is no real cost, if you just search your pocket change. But now is the time to do it, sort out the copper pennies. Save Nickels. Both of these coins will not only retain their FULL FACE VALUE, but copper pennies are already worth Double, and Nickels are really close to 5¢ and were worth almost 8¢ when Copper was over $4/pound and nickel was $10/pound. (2008) This is FREE Savings, unless you go out and buy rolls for searching. If you do Nickels, watch for the 1942-45 Silver War Nickels. They are worth a lot more :D

    I have over 40# of Copper Cents, and just a few nickels because I cashed them in. Just the garden variety nickels, I kept the Silver and old numis.

    Copper Cents (pennies) are mid-1982 and older. If you find a 1983 copper cent, it is worth about $15,000 to collectors, so check the 83 cents for the copper “RING” sound they make when bounced on the table.
    Copper Cents weigh 3.1 grams, the zinc clad cents are 2.5 grams. I can practically feel and see the difference. Seeing an evenly copper oxide coated (patina) penny is a good indication it is Copper. Very few of the zinc cents will be colored this way, dissimilar metals and all that…

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #31395
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    UndeRGRound, I would like to hear more about re-burning used oil. Would you consider doing a step-by-step post on how to do it or give a web reference on how to do it?

    We do a lot of oil changes around here. It would be great to have a “safe” way for us to reuse the oil rather than having to pay to recycle it. :)

    #31399
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    Traveling extensively for work has allowed me to build up a great supply of toiletries. Not only for personal use, but in a SHTF scenario they will make for great barter items. Most hotels replace the items every day. So a three day trip can yield a pretty good stash. My wife used to make fun of me, until someone we know had an emergency, we were able to put a kit together for them that carried them for a couple of weeks. She is now a believer.

    #31400
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Horel toiletries, always ask for extra.
    But take your own. Younpaid for em, why not.

    Condiment packets, first, mice love these as a word of warning.

    Second, expiration dates. These often sit around a back room until near expired. They do go bad.

    But yes I am all for picking up the little freebees, long as I can keep the wife from throwing em away.

    #31401
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    c wrote:

    UndeRGRound, I would like to hear more about re-burning used oil. Would you consider doing a step-by-step post on how to do it or give a web reference on how to do it?

    We do a lot of oil changes around here. It would be great to have a “safe” way for us to reuse the oil rather than having to pay to recycle it. :)

    Here’s one I found, (have not tried) looks relatively cheap and easy…

    http://www.endtimesreport.com/cleaning_engine_oil.html

    Takes quite a bit of time, but I suspect a home-made gravity filter could be nearly as good, and lots faster…
    I was thinking of a metal mesh screen, followed by paper and sand style filtration, but I still have not done it myself. Really should get something in place, so I can safely use the motor oil without worry of hurting my diesel generator!

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #31402
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    LOL , I hear that !!! I spent 25 years on the road , I have more hotel soaps , shampoos , lotions than I know what to do with , but they are the perfect size for camping kits , etc .

    #31404
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    Roadracer wrote:

    Traveling extensively for work has allowed me to build up a great supply of toiletries. Not only for personal use, but in a SHTF scenario they will make for great barter items. Most hotels replace the items every day. So a three day trip can yield a pretty good stash. My wife used to make fun of me, until someone we know had an emergency, we were able to put a kit together for them that carried them for a couple of weeks. She is now a believer.

    Excellent!
    I do not travel much, but it’s a great Micro-Prep!
    SAVE ANYTHING that can be an SHTF Item! I store items in 5 gallon buckets, and if you cannot get the free ones, WalMart has them pretty reasonable. Lids, too.

    Good Points, Whirli
    I got that covered, but thanks for bringing it up. Mice and rats can chew through anything that is not metal, BTW… so extra measures are needed. Poison, Traps, cats, rat terriers… etc

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #31410
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    My husband would say, every household should have an organized junk heap. Finding ways to reuse items that would be tossed out in a normal household is a good practice for an uncertain future… plus reusing items saves money… and having to make the money in the first place. Getting into the habit of going to the junk heap before driving down to the store changed our lives. Here’s one example of taking an old barbecue and transforming it into a potting bench.

    http://goboxstorage.ca/blog/living-the-life-broken-barbecue-into-mobile-potting-bench/

    I’m working on two projects right now. It takes time to figure these re-purposing projects out but I think they are good practice for an uncertain future.
    1. I have old wool socks that get so full of holes that they can’t be repaired. Normally, people would just throw the old socks out but the upper part of the socks are always in good condition. I have cut off the leg part of the sock and cut the tube down the side. I will try sewing three of these pieces together to make a wool neck warmer for skiing.
    2. I have a old pair of wool army pants that are coming apart at the seams everywhere. These pants have given me four years of hard use and I can’t seem to keep ahead of the seam repairs. (I have recently found another two pairs of these exact pants used.) I am thinking of cutting up the pants and making a haversack with the two cargo pockets. This would also give me repair materials for the other three good pairs of pants.

    PURCHASING MOTTO: I try to get away with buying very little. I always look to the used market before buying from the new market. When I do buy, I’m very careful of the quality. I avoid buying any item that will increase my waste stream in my household. When I do buy consumables with packaging, I choose the consumable with packaging I want and will be reusing in the household: buckets, pails, glass containers, etc. I try to reuse everything before I consider throwing it out. I don’t hoard, but I think having a junk pile to scavenge from is a good practice. I’m looking more and more towards natural materials in my local bioregion for solving my problems.

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