Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #10250
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Currently fighting an infestation of mice. They have ruined some of my stash. Found loose kernels of corn on the floor. I dug around and found several packages opened. I thought my packaging was rodent proof, not so. So now I am redoing my methods and placement of food. Dry products will be vacuum packed and placed in plastic containers. I then will seal the lids with duct tape.
    Any further ideas?

    Thanks
    Robin

    #10253
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Get a couple of Tom Cats , female cats hunt as well , but the male cats are much more active about it . Give them free access to the room you are storing your food in . Not the most efficient method , but the good thing about cats , are they are nocturnal , they are wide awake when you are asleep ………..when the mice are active as well . They get bored and will walk around the house looking for something to entertain themselves with .

    #10258
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I would not use male cats. They have a tendency to spray mark their territory. Not what I want on my food. Would definitely recommend a spayed female. Don’t want 25 cats to deal with in SHTF. Another thing is find out where they are getting in and stuff the hole with steel wool. They don’t like chewing on it. Rodents are just something you have to deal with when storing food. Put mouse traps on the floor along walls in storage area. Rodents hug walls for cover so it is a natural travel lane for them

    #10260
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Ok Robin – Please think before taking Tolik’s advice about the Tom Cat’s! Sorry Tolik my friend. But a male, neutered or not sprays everything, all the time, marking territory. I can’t even imagine having my storage stuff reeking of cat spray which is odious!

    Get D-Con mice stuf – f they go in it, eat it and croak – do it now. There is no such thing as one mouse. Get a cat perhaps but get a spayed female – and don’t overly feed them wet food like Fancy Feast! Of course, some cats are too lazy to hunt. Or if you are a dog person, consider a terrier like a rat terrier or norwich. Small dog that has a real nose for them and will drive you crazy until they can get them if something is in their way. Then check the area thoroughly and try and find where they are coming in. Mice can get through incredibly small spaces (I think it is about 1/4 or 1/2″?) I’ve heard babies can get in spaces as small as a pencil eraser. Seal up everything you can find, especially around pipes and stuff. Stuff steel wool in it or otherwise try and seal up any place they may be getting in. It is well worth the time to protect your investment. Check back frequently for signs of them and take action.

    Second, if funds and time permit, consider lining your main food storage area with sheet metal and seal the seams. Over time, mice can eat through just about anything but metal and glass.

    There are ‘natural’ pest/mouse control remedies like using peppermint oil, ultrasonic gizmos etc. Personally, I don’t screw around with that when it comes to my storage stuff. I want to be SURE I don’t get a mouse infestation, nor do I want hantavirus.

    When you clean up after mice – becareful! Orkin says it best:

    ‘Mice may carry bacteria, viruses and other diseases. As a result, cleaning efforts following an infestation must be cautiously attempted.

    It is important not to disturb dust particles or rodent feces in affected areas. Nest materials should also be left undisturbed during this time. Sweeping or vacuuming these materials may lead to the further release of harmful airborne particles.

    Deer mice are the primary transmitters of hantavirus, although other rodents such as white-footed mice, cotton rats, and rice rats may also be carriers. This virus can be fatal and is found within the deer mouse’s feces, urine and saliva. Hantavirus is transmitted to humans through airborne particles, and symptoms are similar to those of the common flu. However, individuals with this virus must seek medical attention immediately upon recognition.
    Cleaning Mouse Droppings

    Mouse droppings are spindle-shaped and are approximately the size of a grain of rice. Certain mouse species transmit diseases and viruses through their droppings, urine and saliva.

    All surfaces that have come into contact with mice or excrement should be thoroughly disinfected. Mouse droppings and debris should be carefully picked up and disposed of with sturdy nonabsorbent gloves. An OSHA-approved respirator with functioning cartridges should be worn. It also is advised that clothing worn during cleaning be thrown away immediately afterward.

    It is important not to sweep or vacuum mouse droppings, as these cleaning methods cause the release of more airborne virus particles. Dispose of any towels or cloths that come into contact with feces or the surfaces of an infested room. Gloves should be disposed of, and it is suggested that the hands be washed several times after cleaning.

    Place all contaminated and cleaning materials in plastic trash bags that seal tightly. Each plastic trash bag should be sealed tightly inside yet another plastic trash bag. Dispose of trash in landfills or outdoor garbage bins. Hands should be washed thoroughly and the newly cleaned area should be exposed to fresh air and sunshine for a number of hours.’

    Don’t take chances with your health.

    #10264
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I have always had male cats , none of them sprayed anything ………………all of mine were also neutered , all of them were also indoor only cats , I would wake up and find dead bugs , and whatever else they found while I was asleep . The indoor /outdoor cats might spray ……because they have unknown territories to patrol , like I said , I dont know ,because none of mine ever sprayed anything . Almost all of mine were Siamese mix , much smarter than the average cat , but that was more how I got the animals than a preference on my part .

    #10269
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    You are one lucky man Tolik! I have three neutered male cats – all spray – all live outside because of it. I have never figured out why they do this – even when there are no ‘outsiders’ coming around that might make them feel like they need to mark/defend their territory.

    #10270
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    You may need to use steel trash cans. The plastic will not stop them.

    #10271
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    DCon is effective, but often the mice go elsewhere to die. If it is in your wall or other inaccessible place, you have a stinky situation for a week or so. We use old-fashioned snap traps, baited with peanut butter (not cheese.) Then you know where the body is…and can dispose of it cleanly. You can disinfect the trap and reuse.

    I have had cats in my past life, and some of them are extremely lazy. Others are avid hunters. Depends on the individual cat. Don’t care for them since they tend to poop in my nice clean garden…and elsewhere. Will not tolerate kitty litter in the house. Can pick up diseases from them too… OK now some of you hate me ;)

    #10273
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Right, freedom, about the plastic. We have prepper friends who had a lot of food stored in plastic totes. The mice chewed into them and ruined quite a few. Now they put their plastic totes inside metal cabinets. But Tweva is right, mice can squeeze through incredibly small holes, compressing their pliable bone structure.

    Metal garbage cans are excellent if you can find any that are strong. Not like they used to be… We used to keep our dog food in one with the lid tied down to keep raccoons out of it. With a good tight lid, excellent for mice.

    #10274
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Tweva ,
    Thats very odd , too bad they are doing that ……………that smell is the worst . Too bad , because they can be very good companions otherwise , like I said , most of mine were Siamese mix , the only problem I had was with a pure Siamese , they are one person cats , and I had issues when he would sit on my lap , and hiss at my girlfriend . Needless to say , I kept the girlfriend and found a good home for the Siamese .

    #10275
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    wildartist, I buy the U. S. made trash cans at HomeDepot. For the dog food that I store I tape the top with the aluminum tape.

    #10280
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Wildartist – I love cats – but not always having cats. Only once have I purposefully brought home a cat years and years ago. All the rest simply find me. This place came with a bunch.They work for their living pretty much. My barn is relatively mouse free – they live there. But, I am also very careful housekeeping. Grain is put up tight. Floors swept and grain/feed cleaned up daily. Re Decon: I don’t worry about the smell because one or two is not a problem – if it were a big nest it might reek. I do use some traps but if you forget to check them you can have the same rotting carcass issue. My main garden is hotwired and fenced – they can’t get in there ’cause I feel same as you. Any house cat I’ve had I trained to bang on a set of bells I hang from the doors when they need to go out. One accident – ok – reprieve. Second? You live outdoors. (Of course, they have insulated cat houses around or they can stay in the barn in winter)
    ———–
    Note to people living near a pond etc. – this seems to be a magnet for rats. Rats are awful creatures! A friend had them get into the walls of her old house – the racket was awful and creepy. I brought over a trap and got 3 families of the big *******. We used to have rat issues on some of the ships I managed as well. Constantly working against them. Hate rats even more than mice – musta been a plaque victim in another life!
    ————-
    Freedom: keeping stuff in garbage cans is great.

    Tolik – I have no idea why they do this – but they aren’t the first males (neutered) that do this – you must have ‘civilized’ cats! My sister had a favorite cat that got ‘angry’ at her when she went on vacation and would pee in her shoes! Only when she was on vacation. She learned to send her to a kennel when she went away. Anyway, cats are fascinating and very smart animals.

    #10587
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Just ran across this great multi-mouse trap to make Robin!

     

    Click here for instructions

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #10593
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    That is cool! I have never seen something like this.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.