Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #44250
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I thought this might be an interesting video for anyone interested in woodwork to watch. It is not a complete how to but you can see how barrels are made. The exact shape and size and number of the staves would be needed to construct a barrel.

    #44251
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Natural ‘carbonation’, vs modern CO2 injection.
    The old style had much less pressure involved and you can get away with oaken barrels, while the modern versions require the metal cans or bottles else the gas would leak out.

    Yes its an oversimplification, but still accurate.

    Reminds me to check the carboy tonite, check the next batch.

    #44252
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly,
    I think modern kegs are used because of the lower cost of manufacturing and are reusable after sterilization. Reusing a wooden barrel for foods would present health issues.

    Barrels made from White Oak are completely liquid tight because of the cellular structure of the species unlike most other hardwood trees. The bungs would pop out before gas leaked though a stave.

    #44253
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Very much so, plus the modern barrels (kegs) are almost infinitely refillable. However some whiskey/wine barrels sre reused for the other to infuse a particular flavor.

    The amount of natural carbonation is fairly low even with the secondary step to aid its production. A bung popping would signify an issue with the barrel/batch and most likely one that will be dumped.

    Barrel production is certainly neat, but with so few craftsmen left to make them, even with modern manufacturing methods, its rapidly becoming a lost art.

    #44254
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    A lot of non drinkers dont realize that whiskey , in its natural state is clear . Its the barrels , charred from the inside that give it its color , as well as some flavor . I believe rum is the same way , but not sure .

    #44259
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly,
    I really posted the video so people could see the skill of the workers and the tools they use. The guys shaping the staves never use anything to measure the curved tapers or angles. They cut off huge shavings with a draw knife that could only be dome with an insanely sharp draw tool. The wood they are cutting is extremely hard white oak dried for 5 years. One of the guys is using a jointer, it looks like a old cabbage cutter; only it’s about 6 feet long. The steamer is the giant cone they lower over the barrel after one end is hooped. Oak dried this long takes about an hour to soften enough to bend without splitting out the stave. The methods they use are basically the same as have been used since barrels were invented. The same methods could be used by any prepper to make barrels, buckets or tanks in the future. Water tanks and buckets can be made from White Cedar. White Cedar water tanks are used for roof top water supplies and sprinkler systems. Cedar has been in use for tanks of this type for over 100 years.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #44269
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I have a lot of white cedar in my woods. All I’m missing are the skills to do anything useful with it.

    #44271
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    If the trees are large enough have some logged and cut into 4/4″ boards. The wood has excellent resistance to rot, and is very dimensionaly stable. It’s great for anything you want built for outdoor use like a picnic table, bench or a boat.

    #44274
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    A free source for metal banding , are construction sites . They are used for keeping heavy loads together , such as lumber and pipe . They throw it away , and dont mind you getting rid of what they look at as trash . If you have a small buzz box MIG wire welder , thats even better .

    #44278
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tolik,
    Although strapping is strong it is probably hard to work with in a barrel application because of the thinness. Barrel bands are not straight. In order to contact the barrels surface across the entire band they are formed with a radius matching the barrel tapper. Like making a cone shape. Edge bending them might be a problem. Because the strapping is thin it would make driving them down onto the barrel difficult. Although for small buckets with little tapper they would be fine. Bands made from 18 or 16 gauge steel would probably be easier to work.

    #44281
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    74, I have at least a couple acres of white cedar, some of it a pretty good size. Last week I removed 600′ or so of old farm fence that separated my yard from the new property I’m buying. The posts were handmade from white cedar, most likely from my woods being my neighbors don’t seem to have much of it. I’m guessing they were 30 to 40 years old. Some were rotted but many were still good. I suppose it is a good asset to have that I hadn’t thought much about.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.