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  • #33894
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Much of the US is currently in the midst of a bitter cold snap. It was somewhere in the minus 10 to minus 15 F range locally last night and is still pretty darn cold right now. I live in a log home which is essentially two houses, the original structure and a subsequent addition put on by a former owner that doubled the size of the house. The back half of the house is basic post and beam construction with exposed log walls. The front half has sheetrock covering the logs, insulation, and then a 2nd layer of sheetrock. I have no idea why it has two layers of sheetrock but it does. Even on a day like today, the exposed logs in the back part of the house are not cold to the touch (nor do they get warm on the hottest day in summer), the logs clearly having significant insulating power in their non-conducting of external temperatures. The sheetrock walls however are definitely cool to the touch, both interior and exterior walls. I presume that they are somehow transmitting cold from their contact with the attic and basement spaces. Before anyone asks, the attic is insulated. The basement is usually 50 in the winter but is currently in the low 40’s given how cold it is outside.

    What I am thinking is that log construction can be a good choice for post-SHTF conditions where it won’t be so easy to heat and cool your living space. Logs are also a bit harder to penetrate than basic wood frame contruction too (though as good as brick or stone).

    #33920
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Mtb,
    Post shtf log & timber frame structures will be “The Method” for the same reasons they were used in early American homes. Untill saw mills are running boards are out period.

    #33923
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Another ‘plus’ for log homes is that they do well in earthquakes. We were in an older one during a 7.9 in Alaska, 2003, which lasted three minutes or so–long and hard for an earthquake. Just shook and rattled the logs, nothing collapsed.

    #33942
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    MB,

    A possible reason for the inner layer of drywall is that it might be moisture resistant drywall, as is used in bathrooms. Perhaps the builders used it as a method of stopping moisture transmission from the outer layer of logs to the insulation…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #33962
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Malgus, another possibility for the sheetrock is just aesthetics. The back half of my house was a kit and so all of the wood is finished very nicely. That’s pretty much the story with all modern log homes. The front half is what some log restoration folks called a real log home. I had hired them to do some work for me when we bought the place. Apparently the logs came from the property and the house was built log by log without factory finishing, only what they did themselves on site. I suspect the interior was very rough looking pre-sheetrock and either the original owner or a subsequent owner covered it over with sheetrock. Even then, having two layers would still be a mystery though.

    #33983
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Big logs will keep out the cold if well chinked simply because of sheer mass I would think, if I recall physics correctly. They probably put in the layer of sheet rock next to the logs as their version of a vapor barrier of sorts would be my thinking. Having ‘wrapped’ stuff I can’t see how it would be easy to use standard vapor barrier/wrap on a log wall. And as Malgus said, that layer is probably OSB or something for the moisture repelling qualities. Don’t know if they use the spray foam stuff nowadays directly on interior logs or not although can’t see why you couldn’t

    #34112
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    The thing with the extra layers of sheet rock may have been an effort to square up the room. I have done similar things in homes such as yours. One house was out of square in one corner by 1/2 inch and in the other corner of the same wall it was 1 3/4 inches. Happens a lot in log homes.
    Robin

    #35236
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Storm warning

    http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/blizzard-15/blizzard-2015-250-mile-stretch-northeast-braces-storm-n292991

    Sounds like very cold weather – very soon in New York

    #35238
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Yes it will be quite a storm with some parts of New England getting up to 3 feet of snow with the worst of it stretching from the Metro NYC area to the Metro Boston area (and north up the coast. That corridor is home to well more than 25 million people in densely packed cities and suburban areas. Up where I live this storm won’t be a big deal, maybe a foot of new snow, just enough to make it postcard pretty, but not so much as to be especially problematic. I need to go to an important gun rights rally about 75miles from here tomorrow and will just need to go slower is all. Bloomberg & friends have targeted VT and are pumping lots of money into the State trying to force upon us new guns laws via solutions looking for a problem. Our current near lack of gun laws in combination with being the least violent State in the country does not fit their agenda, and they (Bloomberg etc) don’t like it.

    #35240
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    “..just enough to make it postcard pretty,..” I love your attitude towards bad the weather. I hope many people will be there in support of the rally. Please drive safe

    It’s a nice 84 F / 30degrees Celsius this side. I think I will freez my b off at -9

    #35297
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Looks like NYC didn’t get that blizzard after all. The storm tracked east of what they thought. Pretty much an ordinary kind of storm for the Metro NYC area. Southern and Coastal New England, and Eastern Long Island got the blizzard though. I woke up this morning to no new snow at all but about an hour ago it finally started here. The temperature is only 7 degrees so the flakes are very tiny. It’ll take a lot to accumulate much. We’ve been downgraded to a 6 to 11 inch accumulation and I’m betting we’ll only see the low end of the range. For us that’s the kind of storm that nobody would even talk about if there weren’t all the blizzard hype to the south. Still enough to make things postcard pretty though. The snow is very dry too so there shouldn’t be problems with hardpack on the roads. I’ll know soon enough when I head out to a gun rights rally today.

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