Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #4033
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    It seems all forums have a main divide of people that are where they intend to ‘take a stand’ and those that believe they must make a Plan ‘B’ to leave their current living place at some point. Therefore, some topics therefore are of more interest to one group over another.

    Currently live in an urban or suburban area or xurb and believe you need a Plan ‘B’, If so, currently, what are the top 3 goals you are working on now as time permits? Your top 3 goals main concerns/potential problems you are addressing?

    Are you already at your retreat/location you plan to stay/BOL? If so, I started a topic for you, maybe go there.

    For me, I live where I intend to leave this earth, or the very near vicinity. I chose to make the trip and reorder/change my life a few years ago. Surprises, to me, are not something I enjoy.

    For others in your situation, what is your answer to the question – top 3 immediate goals?

    #4044
    Profile photo of Kollaps
    Kollaps
    Survivalist
    member3

    Because my common-law wife and I live on the other side of the country from our families, we have been faced with this issue.

    Our plan is to leave where we are (if we have time), and hunker down at a friend’s farm in the next state over if things get out of hand. Lots of land, established crops, and herd of cattle. In exchange, I’m teaching them martial arts (I was on the path of becoming a certified instructor before I went in, and subsequently had to move for her schooling).

    That’s best case scenario. Worst case scenario is we hoof it to another friend’s property closer by, but without the amenities that would make life easier.

    Hopefully, assuming things ever get back to normal and our loved ones survive, we will have a reunion. That said, we are prepared for the worst, and speak with our families every week in case it is ever the last time we speak with them.

    #4098
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Hello Kollaps – this is a hard thing, among the many, to consider in making/revising plans. What to do about distant relatives, worry about them. This is made more difficult if you are among the family that want to make some plans/have made at least some small thought on the matter of possible future problems…and the other loved ones see absolutely no value in it. In the end, I think your last words, unfortunately, are something to be prepared for too:
    ‘ speak with our families every week in case it is ever the last time we speak with them’. –

    There are so many scenarios that must run through your mind constantly in the situation you are; I hope you never must experience Plan ‘B’ much less Plan ‘C’. But it seems, if I recall your introduction/life background, you will no doubt make wise choices to the benefit of as many loved ones as you can under the circumstances. Never doubt yourself/instincts. One can only do what one can do. Best to you.

    #4145
    Profile photo of Kollaps
    Kollaps
    Survivalist
    member3

    Thanks, Tweva.

    Really, if things got that bad, we know that our families would ultimately want us to be safe. They know I can defend myself better than the average bear, and they know I prepare for situations like that. In essence, they trust my judgment, and know not to come look for me on the other side of the nation if something like that happens.

    I made a preliminary plan for them, but I doubt they’d follow or even remember it. That said, my dad taught me a lot about wilderness survival, and my brother has the fighter spirit in him, so I think if they could get out of the city in time, they’d get through it one way or another.

    God forbid, if the worst ever happened, and my family or I didn’t make it out, I’m glad there is no ill-will, bad blood, or other regrets. I spent a lot of time with my folks, and have a strong relationship with them and my brother. Really, there isn’t anything more I can do if things go sideways, and nothing I can really change as it relates to my relationship with them.

    Knowing how I think, I’m glad it is that way. It helps me be patient, as there is no rush to get back home on the other side of the country–where they might not still even be–to try to mend things I have control over now. I can sit tight, and hopefully, when things get back to some degree of stability, I will find them. If they aren’t around anymore, for whatever reason, nothing was held back.

    #4148
    nlouise
    nlouise
    Survivalist
    member4

    My three immediate goals?
    I am just going to batten down the hatches. Not looking for plan B unless the situation warrants it. I live in a semi-rural area but have neighbors and live in a neighborhood. I don’t like surprises either. Somehow I don’t see myself running to the woods, eating grubs to stay alive, and drinking from streams. Perhaps 20 years ago it would have been different.
    My three immediate goals are: 1-Spiritual Life in order, 2- Food, Water, and First Aid all prepped, 3- Necessary devices and security purchased/stocked and ready.
    I’m good on the first two goals but the third is tough. I feel like my home is not very secure. You know the movie Scream? The one where the babysitter is running from one set of French doors to the next to lock out the intruder who is calling her and trying to get in? Well my house reminds me of that same situation where I have so many doors and windows to come in through that I need to figure all the security stuff out. I’ve seen youtube videos, and read up on security measures, considered black window coverings, thought about rigging homemade security trip wires and such, but still haven’t found what I am looking for. I suppose I could nail wood over each window the way they did in the original Night of the Living Dead?!?!?!

    #4177
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    I know I posted in the other thread that I’m already at my BOL, and that I don’t really see myself as to ever having to bug out, unless there are some pretty severe things happening, so I figured I’d throw my hat into that ring.

    Fire. Fire is a major concern all the time, but more so in a grid down time. That’d be my #1 reason for having to leave this house, but it wouldn’t really send me off into the woods, since I’ve got many good friends and family close by.

    Tsunami. I live on the coast. Many years ago there was indeed a tsunami here in Newfoundland. If there was another earthquake of worrisome size in the Grand Banks, it may drive me inland if there was a tsunami produced. Also, La Palma could create a mega-tsunami, in which case, I’m getting as far inland as fast as possible, and to a higher elevation.

    Being over run by hostile forces. It could be organized crime gangs, a large group of refugees/people who want to take by force, or even a foreign military. But that’d have me going to ground, doing E&E, and most likely mounting counter attacks or asymmetrical style attacks.

    I have thought about all of those, along with a few others, and have made a few plans for either, but nothing set in stone just yet.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #4185
    Profile photo of Kiwi25
    Kiwi25
    Survivalist
    member3

    I think you should always have a plan B.. and a backup for that..:-). And you still may have to improvise, because what actually happens may not be what you have prepared for. That is the nature of life…

    #4307
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    I live in a city for 43 years, left 15 years ago when I got remarried, now living on the edge of a small town, very low population, in a rural area. most people would say we have bugged out already, we plan to bug in if possible but if it gets really bad we have a BOL to run to just in case-sort of plan B- a deserted and unused farm cottage(hasn’t been used for about 12 years that we know of) in a out of the way location.

    British Survivalist.

    #4331
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Plan A and plan B, always are followed C,D,E and F
    As stated I plan to stick her out at home for as long as possable, BUT I have to also think about plan B being done as well. Plan B means taking two trucks, along with a rv. So for this staying home for long is buggered. We wont make it to the BOL. I am on a 5 mile by 9 mile island. on and off is by a car holding Ferry which would likely shut down unless the government states it will run to evc the Island. That is the only way off for us with vehicles. So then plan C and so on comes in. C and D, I really dont want to think about in all honestly.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #4336
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    nlouise – I can indentify! Homes were built to let in light and make going from anywhere in the house to the outside without a lot of trouble. Now what was such a blessing is a bit of a nightmare.One I am now working more on. Selco and his experience/outlook has helped me a lot. The first thing I decided was to have a plan to stop or at least slow people even getting near here if possible/needed. For me, a chainsaw, sweat and neighbor help will fell a few select huge trees that will help that. Second was to make window coverings like I did when I lived in Florida for the hurricane preparation. As I have time I am painting the outside facing side to look old, dirty, been there a long time. Slowly as funds happen I am having the 3m product that makes it almost impossible to break through the glass put on. I have already removed/sealed/changed 2 doors. Was 6 to outside, now more manageable. They are steel doors anyway but now with security type of hinges/locks a friend in the business helped with. My next thing was to figure what I could do to leave the house and go away somewhere close by if the place is broken into/people come- without being seen. An interesting puzzle if must be done in daylight. For now that is basically it as available funds are slowly spread on the many other things on my list of concerns. My only suggestion would be to maybe get a dog? I know they can save you from lots of not so nice stuff and are good early warning system if nothing else. Good luck but keep thinking – you’ll figure it out to your satisfaction I expect.

    #4349
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Kiwi25 – a big ‘Yep’ to your post

    #4351
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Are you, are you planning/working on doing anything to the deserted place? Curious how well you like the change from city to rural. Been hard for you?

    #4358
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    no, cant do anything about the deserted place as legally it is still owned by the local farm.if I could get the money I would try and buy it, then live in it permanently. change from city to rural wasn’t hard, I wanted to get out for years but couldn’t because of work, I married a country girl who didn’t like living “in the city”(we lived in the suburbs) so leaving wasn’t a problem, my mothers family were farmers so maybe its in my blood?

    British Survivalist.

    #4416
    Profile photo of Tuffhorse
    Tuffhorse
    Survivalist
    member1

    Our place is probably a good bug in location, but as Selco has mentioned many times, that can all change in the blink of an eye. I live 17 miles from the nearest town but I can assure you, in my view the gangs are going to start venturing further and further out into our area because they know us country folk have a habit of storing extra of everything…food, fuel, ammo, etc.

    I’m taking some stuff, a little at a time on a pack horse, and making caches in various places. I’m counting on the fact that cash money is likely to be useless, but things like salt, coffee, flour, bourbon, hard candies, and ammo are going to be worth a lot more than even gold or silver.

    My dilemma is that I work in downtown St. Louis and my home is 50 miles away. My truck has been voted by my co-workers as “most likely place to find a gun”. I have my “get home bag” with me at all times, enough food to last me 30 days, good hiking boots, extra clothing and socks kept in a dry bag…I’m always thinking of something to add…a LifeStraw was my most recent addition along with 10 mylar blankets for shelter, etc.

    #4421
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    had a similar conversation on my British forum, unlike you Yanks British people wont travel very far, most are scared of the countryside-they have no experience of it you see-why should they when all their food comes from a supermarket, most don’t know one end of a cow/steer from the other!

    British Survivalist.

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