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  • #23087
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    This account by Southern Belle Prepper of her experiences of H. Katrina is a few years old now but still of great value, I think. I know there have been other experiences told here about such crisis situations, but often there are new ideas to consider. She details what happened to her or what she heard about from others, and the lessons learned.

    https://sites.google.com/site/southernbelleprepper/lessons-from-katrina

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #23099
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Elijah, Thanks for the link. I think this blog is a good story for reluctant prepper associates to read as motivational encouragement.

    #23101
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    elijah, I have total many here about how the government will take what you have in an SHTF, rural areas are not safe from the government taking your supplies. READ number 33.

    #23103
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    The point that was made about friends of friends showing up was a good one. We often think in terms of just friends and family showing up to our place in a time of disaster and then fighting off angry mobs and un prepared neighbors. When an invited friends dear Aunt so and so who lives down the road from them shows up with them what do you do? How do you handle it? Depending on the nature of the disasters it may be easy but if the disasters could last an indefinite amount of time, what then? Those are decisions that need to be thought about now and discussed. There may not be a right one but there will be a hard one and everyone on the invited list needs to be on the same page.

    #23108
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    So Granny Gums shows up, can’t do anything and can’t really contribute.
    Are we willing to sacrifice our humanity over a few beans?

    What if that were you?
    None of us are getting any younger.
    None of us is in perfect health.

    Are we willing to potentially sacrifice friends and partners over this? The situation may take days, weeks, months or years, we just don’t know. Granny Gums may just leave you lower Manhattan in her will for your generosity. And one day you may collect.

    This is one area where the American nuclear family falls down in comparison to the European extended family group.

    #23124
    Profile photo of Novus Ordo
    Novus Ordo
    Hunter
    rprepper

    Actually, Granny Gums is probably one of the most valuable members you can get – doubtless she’ll probably know how to cook on a fire, have ten uses for every item, can darn clothes and has lots of entertaining stories for the kids…

    Personally, part of my preps are for charity and surprise visitors – there just has to be a solid understanding of how things will be run. This isn’t to say that the door will be open to all, but turning away extended family would be a sure way to isolate yourself from further family relationships when/if things get better. Even other family will probably alienate you. Worth it? Not in my book. Regardless of being in Granny’s will – just living with yourself turning them away would be a chore.

    Things to think about for sure.

    Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property... mischief would ensue were the law-abiding deprived of the use of them.
    - Thomas Paine

    #23131
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Oh I agree but everyone in the group may not, especially if you have a friend of a friend who shows up who was not or did not prepare. Having someone you are unfamiliar with or find out in short order that you do not like brought into your group could cause problems. I like people and would have a hard time turning a person away. It is just a detail that needs to be thought about and discussed before hand.

    #23142
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Actually, Granny Gums is probably one of the most valuable members you can get – doubtless she’ll probably know how to cook on a fire, have ten uses for every item, can darn clothes and has lots of entertaining stories for the kids…

    I agree, this will be the case for the next few years as long as the pre 1950 generation is still around. But most people born after 1950 probably know little old time skills, especially if they grew up in a city.

    I think one of the biggest assets older people bring to groups is their wisdom and usually resilience because they have simply experienced a lot more than younger people.

    They can become a center of calm and this can have tremendous effects on the whole group.

    About family units. I see in Asia every day how great families stick and work together. Here few people expect any help from the government, instead your own family is your safety net. Very good for survival scenarios because they just stick to the same people they did all their lives.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #23145
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Agree.
    Older folks are much tougher simply because they learned to cope with bigger problems then younger generations.
    And here older folks still carry knowledge that is actually completely unknown to the new generations.

    #23154
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Great article. Katrina was a learning experience at many levels.

    #23160
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Great lessons to learn. We will have a lot to think about in a large SHTF.

    #23176
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’ve been thinking about this more, and it really boggles my mind that when people have several days notice that a hurricane is on the way that they can’t even do the most minimal of preparations such as get some cash and fill the gas tank. If the hurricane fizzles or goes in a different direction, great, and you still have the cash and gas.

    This weekend I was a volunteer at a very large fundraiser. I ran the registration tables. Most people pre-registered. I personally handled the same day registrations. Though it was probably a good guess on their part that I’d take cash, check, or credit card, that was a gamble nonetheless being we were out in a farm field and maybe wouldn’t have been able to take credit cards, or perhaps by policy wouldn’t have taken checks. I’d never have showed up expecting to use anything other than cash, but hardly any of them did. Lucky for them I took checks and credit cards. Lots of people came the night before and camped out on the farm, most having registered and paid in advance. However, many just showed up expecting to camp, just assuming we had unlimited space to accommodate them. Fortunately we were able to find spots for them because they’d of slept in their vehicles otherwise. Every hotel in the area was sold out on account of this event so there was nowhere else to go.

    Any hiccup with societal infrastructure will catch most people completely unprepared.

    The part of the Katrina story that elijah posted that makes me a bit squeamish are the uninvited friends of friends. I’d be hard pressed to turn people away myself, especially if they are being vouched for by people I trust, but they do represent an unplanned for drain on resources and potentially a security threat. Towards that eventuality, I keep adding to my preps pile. Depending upon the circumstances it could turn into a positive if the extra guests bring with them a valuable skill or represent a beneficial labor or security resource.

    #31379
    Profile photo of Java
    Java
    Survivalist
    member1

    Thanks for posting this Elijah. It reminded me of another excellent first-hand description of Katrina:

    http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs/klessons/index.html

    On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina became the largest natural disaster in United States history. After the levees failed, it became the largest man-made disaster in United States history. This blog is a chronicle of what happened to myself and my family during those events. It is also a documentation of lessons learned from a survival and recovery viewpoint.

    This blog intertwines several elements. One element is the actual experience of disaster. Another element is a step by step guide to preparing yourself and your family for the day when you might face some unforeseen circumstance. I invite you to seriously invest the time, effort, and small cost in creating your own emergency plans. If you do not know where to begin, just follow along with me and I’ll take you step by step.

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