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  • #43796
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    This is the 3rd in the World Made By Hand series, and the best of the 3 if you ask me. The 1st (World Made By Hand) was good. The 2nd (The Witch of Hebron) went seriously off track into woo woo stuff and was a major disappointment. This newest one I really liked. Some people don’t like Kunstler because they disagree with his politics but having read this series and also his book The Long Emergency and having heard him speak a few years back, he is a pretty sharp and insightful guy. I also find his characters far more realistic than those in Rawles or Bracken’s books. Rawles characters are perfect preppers and expert tacticians to a degree that they don’t seem like real people. Throw in their somewhat extreme fundamentalist religious nature and they are difficult to relate to. I always learn something from Rawles books however so I keep on buying them. It is almost scary sometimes how Bracken can see where things are headed and so I consider his books a must read too but his characters are also a bit too perfect, though far more human than Rawles characters. The main characters in Kunstler’s series aren’t perfect but were just quicker on sizing up the situation when things were falling apart or they were better at adjusting to the new reality than many others.

    For those not familiar, the story line is a small town setting in a post collapse world and how people cope and adapt in this new non-technology world. Based on references to various landmarks in Washington County, I was able to determine the fictional town of Union Grove the story is centered in is the modern day village of Greenwich, NY which was once called Union Village. It is an hour to an hour & a half ride southwest of where I live, and I am intrigued enough to want to take a ride down there sometime soon. Its proximity and cultural fit with small town New England is certainly part of why I can relate to it, but far more important than that is the ordinariness of the main characters and the realism of the situation.

    #43798
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    For those not familiar, the story line is a small town setting in a post collapse world and how people cope and adapt in this new non-technology world.

    That reminds me of the cut-short TV series, “Jericho.” Even though it got a bit dramatic and even boring at times, both my wife and I enjoyed it for multiple reasons. One thing I especially appreciated was the visual observation of people confronted with sudden loss of power due to an EMP, total breakdown in law enforcement, vigilantism, former friends and colleagues turning on each other, the tribalism that very quickly formed, the almost instant clean-out of store shelves, etc. Sometimes we don’t consider what it really could be like beyond just simply what we’d be without, and what we’d need to provide for ourselves. The societal aspect of it is not considered enough (though that seems to be better considered here at the SHTF School).

    Thanks for the recommendation. I tend to read more articles, studies, sites, etc., rather than whole books (particularly fiction), but from time to time make an exception. This might be a worthwhile exception.

    #43801
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    Thanks for the recommendation. I have been reading several different authors writing about post civilization scenarios. Sometimes I think the authors have been reading this forum for material. I thought the book Equipping Modern Patriots: A story of Survival by Jonathan Hollerman was particularly well written.

    #43804
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    The 1st book starts after the collapse and after a depopulating pandemic that came after the collapse. What set the collapse itself in motion was an ill-fated Mideast war that results in a couple nukes going off in American cities which then sets in motion a downward cascade of economic and infrastructure failures. The isolation of Union Grove is such that we know nothing of what is happening elsewhere in the country or the world until the 3rd book. We then learn that as we might expect, post collapse conditions are not uniform given cultural, religious, geographic,and climate differences in a country as large as the US.

    Kunstler, like every other writer in this genre, ignores the elephant in the room……. the nuclear power plants and what happens to them after the grid fails. I otherwise find Union Grove and its inhabitants believable, but as I said in my 1st post, the setting is just a few miles from Vermont and is culturally recognizable to me.

    #45302
    Profile photo of Corvus
    Corvus
    Survivalist
    member4

    The damage from a Nuclear plant melt down would be the super game changer, I plan to haul ass on foot and pedal power if the grid sank past 48 hours, there’s some plants that ( I suppose) that have made some provisions to keep running for at least for a while if the CME/EMP were to happen. Don’t know why they built so many near water! Does Ted Koppel have anything to say about this in his new book Lights Out! ?

    #45304
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Corvus,
    I didn’t finish his book yet but he focuses on cyber attacks. I don’t believe grid failure due to cyber attack would have the same hazard for Nuke plants as an EMP. (But then what do I know about?)

    I do wonder where you plan to go for your escape. Looking at the map locations of nuke power plants and projected plumes there doesn’t appear to be a safe place.

    #45306
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Corvus, there is a book on line called “Lights Out.” Started as an on line E-book.
    Robin

    #45314
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Lights Out by David Crawford is a good book too. I read it a few years ago. It is set in Texas. A part that I particular found interesting was the whole process of the neighborhood organizing itself and of the fact of many friends and family of the residents coming there for refuge. It isn’t just a function of who you may have seek shelter on your property but also that of your neighbors if you live where urban refugees may seek safe haven.

    I just finished Forstchen’s new book One Year After. Spoiler alert here but the manner in which it ends definitely requires a 3rd in the series. It is a very good read but not as riveting as One Second After. I am looking forward to the next in the series though and will definitely buy it.

    I have Ted Koppel’s new book Lights Out on order.

    #45317
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Kopel’s book is good, everyone here knows the informational content alteady, but I think it’s a great loner book. Kopel is main stream enough for people to believe what he is saying.

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