Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #9032
    Tango11
    Tango11
    Survivalist
    member1

    The Gerber LMF II is my current primary go to knife. I carry it on every training exercise and it has held up well to the abuse I’ve put on it.

    The Gerber LMF II is full of great features, but first here are the basic specs:

    Overall Length: 10.59″
    Blade Length: 4.84″
    Weight: 24.28 oz. (w/ Sheath)
    Weight: 11.67 oz. (w/o Sheath)
    Blade Style: Drop Point
    Blade Material: 420HC Stainless
    Blade Type: Serrated
    Handle Material: Glass-filled nylon with TPV overmold
    Sheath Material: Ballistic nylon with fire retardant coating

    I purchased this knife about a year ago as a replacement to my aging USMC issue KA-BAR. I wanted a dedicated drop point full tang knife that I can use in my training which is primary survival/bushcraft.

    The LMF II can literally cut through anything. I’ve used to baton wood at the campsite, cut meat, slice open a computer case, cut paracord and variety of other tasks.

    It has a very comfortable grip, a molle compatible sheath that allows me to mount it on my chest rig if I desire or use the leg straps to secure it to my leg so it doesn’t flop around.

    Some cool features include a sharp ended butt that can be used to break glass and it is designed to easily tie up to a piece of wood or metal to use as spear. The build in sharpener in the sheath also comes in handy.

    Best of all is the price, I believe I purchase mine for about $90 shipped on Ebay. So for that price, you get a lot. Basically all you need in a good bushcraft/survival knife. The molle compatible sheath puts it over the top for me. Plus the blade holds a good edge and will cut through pretty much anything without sustaining any damage to the blade.

    If you are in the market for a great quality bushcraft/survival knife under $100, I strongly suggest the Gerber LMF II.

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    #9226
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    After the Bear Grylls Gerber knives I didn’t look much more into what else the company does but this knife looks fantastic. I guess the wide handle must be very comfortable.

    The sheath looks great too and I love knives with thick blades. Makes me comfortable to baton with them. I like my Bushman as well because I can attach it to a stick or pople and have a spear. This would work well with this knife too.

    So many awesome knifes here… This knife is really high on my wishlist now.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #9227
    Profile photo of Edheler
    Edheler
    Survivalist
    rreviwer

    I have two of these which I use as my primary knife. You can get them somewhat less expensively on Amazon. ($70-75) They are not full tang — but it is done with a purpose to detach the metal butt from the blade. You won’t be able to tell from normal usage. I wish they offered another version with a more exotic blade material at a higher cost because it’s a great knife.

    #9234
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tango11 I really like the Sheath Material. Gerber makes a very good knifes I own many including there multi-tool.

    #9346
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I have never owned a Gerber product , what keeps me away from them I guess , is all the mixed reviews . A lot of people are very pleased with them , and others not so much ……………….I dont know what to believe .

    #9365
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’ve had Gerber knives for over 20 years now,
    At shot show this year, I showed one of the gerber people my old Bolt Action folder, she had never seen the non removable blade model before, but then I think the knife was almost as old as she was.

    The grylls knives are bettet than many reviews give them credit for.
    The revamped parang is actually a decent tool, although the sheath still stinks.
    If they sold them without the idiot markings, they’d sell much better.

    Many years ago, I sold a number of the original LMF to guys headed off to Gulf War I, as well as some other knives. I wouldn’t let those guys buy junk, and it showed when I received a couple of letters from overseas from the guys thanking me for putting them into the better knives.

    #9398
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Gerber and Buck knifes are making many of there in the U. S. A. These are some of the best one’s I like.

    #9431
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Used to do a demonstration in the shop.
    For the .mil guys looking for good knives,.

    Took a 4×4 and set knives against it about 2″ from the point, flat side down. Then I’d stomp on the blade near the guard.

    The Gerber Aussie Bowie (mine), and Cold Steel Trailmaster both took this without any kind of damage. The Buck Buckmaster 184 snapped at the third or fourth saw tooth every time.

    Buck makes a decent product but in my opinion a little hard for certain uses. But because of the hardness, once you get a good edge on one, it will hold it well.

    #9432
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirlibird, Didn’t Buck for some time make there knifes in China? I know that there ads now that there now made in the U. S. A.

    I purchased a pocket knife from Buck and it is made in the U. S. A. and I have two old Buck and they were made in China so maybe they have changed there products.

    Do you know anything about this?

    #9437
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Sorry, been out of that end of the business for 15+ years now.

    But here’s some thing I found.

    http://blog.lazerdesigns.com/2012/03/where-are-buck-knives-made-china-usa/

    #9439
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirlibird, Thanks. The one I just purchased two weeks ago is stamped big BUCK U. S. A. so I think that they are pushing the made in U. S. A. but like I said I own two older Buck knifes stamped made in China. I think that with any of the knife companies that have made in the U. S. A. the steel made here is harder that the Chinese steel.

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